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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "ENGR 210"
COURSE NAME: "Statics"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2016
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Kathleen Hinge
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 4:00PM 5:45PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: MA 198
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides an introduction to statics, the branch of mechanics that is concerned with the analysis of loads (force and torque, or "moment") on physical systems in static equilibrium, that is, in a state where the relative positions of subsystems do not vary over time, or where components and structures are at a constant velocity. When in static equilibrium, the system is either at rest, or its center of mass moves at constant velocity. Course content includes vector algebra, forces, couples, moments, resultants of force couple systems; friction, equilibrium analysis of particles and finite bodies, centroids; and applications.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
Vectors, forces, moments and equilibrium in two and three dimensions.  Structures, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, friction.  Internal forces and moments.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
- represent forces and moments as vectors in two and three dimensions;
- apply equilibrium principles to analyze forces acting on a point or body in two and three dimensions;
- analyze trusses, frames and simple friction problems under equilibrium conditions;
- determine the centroid, center of mass, and moment of inertia for simple and composite cross-sections;
- analyze internal axial and shear forces and bending moment in a loaded beam.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Engineering Mechanics: Statics, 5th editionBedford and FowlerPearson9780132753418 The ISBN number is for the E-text bundled with Mastering Engineering. You may choose to order a hardcopy textbook, but be sure that you purchase it bundled with Mastering Engineering. All homework will be submitted and graded online using Mastering Engineering.
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
HomeworkOnline Homework will be assigned, completed, submitted and graded using Mastering Engineering. Each week's homework assignment is due on Thursday at the start of class. No credit will be given for late assignments.15%
In-class ExamsFive in-class exams will be given, as indicated in the course schedule. The average exam score will count for 60% of the grade.60%
Comprehensive Final ExamStudents whose in-class exam average is an A or A- shall be exempt from the final exam. Otherwise, the comprehensive final exam will count for 25% of the grade.25%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AA: 94-100% A-: 90-92%
BB+: 87-89% B: 83-86% B-: 80-82%
CC+: 77-79% C: 73-76% C-: 70-72%
DD+: 67-69% D: 63-66% D-: 60-62%
FAverage is less than 60%.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY

Attendance will not be taken, except on exam dates.  The penalty for a missed exam is a zero grade.  Students that miss even a single day of lecture are likely to fall behind in the course material.  Each concept introduced in the course builds on mastery of previous concepts.  The best strategy for success in this course is to participate in class and to stay current with all homework assignments.

You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until ____________
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

SessionSession FocusReading AssignmentOther AssignmentMeeting Place/Exam Dates
Week 1Ch 1: Introduction; Units and unit conversions; Dimensional analysis. Ch 2: Vectors in 2- and 3-D: Magnitude, Components, Direction Cosines, Operations (addition, scaling, normalizing, dot product, cross product). Ch 3: Forces in 2- and 3-D: Contact forces (friction, normal force), Weight, Connections (ropes, cables, springs); Free-body diagrams, Solving force equilibrium problems.Sections 1.1-3.3Mastering Engineering HW1May 26
Week 2Ch 4: Systems of Forces and Moments in 2- and 3-D: The Moment Vector; Moment of a force about a line; Couples; Equivalent Systems. Ch 5: Objects in Equilibrium in 2- and 3-D: Free-body diagrams; Supports; Statically determinate problems; Statically indeterminate problems (redundant, improper supports); Two-force members; Three-force membersSections 4.1-5.4Mastering Engineering HW2Jun 2
Week 3Ch 6: Analyzing Structures in Equilibrium: 2-D Trusses (Method of Joints, Method of Sections); 3-D Space Trusses; 2-D Frames and Machines. Ch 7: Centroids of Areas, Volumes and Lines: by Integration, by summation of Composite Shapes. Simplifying Distributed Loads. Center of Mass by Integration, by summation of Composite Objects. Ch 10.7: Center of Pressure.Sections 6.1-7.5, 7.7-7.8, 10.7Mastering Engineering HW3June 9
Week 4Ch 8: Moment of Inertia for Areas: Definition, Parallel-Axis Theorem; Rotated and Principle Axes; Mohr's Circle. Moment of Inertia for Masses: Definition; Parallel-Axis Theorem; Simplified expressions for slender bars and thin plates. Sections 8.1-9.2, 9.6Mastering Engineering HW4Jun 16
Week 5Ch 10: Internal Forces and Moments in Beams: Axial Force, Shear Force and Bending Moment; Shear Force and Bending Moment Diagrams; Relations between Distributed Load, Shear Force and Bending Moment. Cables: Loads distributed uniformly along straight lines; Loads distributed uniformly along cables; Discrete loads.Sections 10.1-10.6Mastering Engineering HW5Jun 23; Comprehensive Final Exam (optional for students with A or A-) Jun 24.