JCU Logo

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PS 337 "
COURSE NAME: "Stereotyping, Prejudice and Discrimination "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Bettina Spencer
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 1:30-3:20 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: PS 101; Recommended: PS 334 or approval of instructor
OFFICE HOURS: TTH 14 -15

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to familiarize students with basic psychological theory and research on intergroup relations, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, so that they can: (1) evaluate and analyze the scientific merit of this research, and (2) apply this research to real world. The goals of this course are to expose students to the core issues, phenomena, and concepts that researchers in this field are attempting to understand and to promote critical thinking about research in this area.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

Summary of Stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination

Motivational approaches to stereotyping and prejudice:
Self-enhancement and prejudice
Rationalizing existing stereotypes

Cognitive approaches to stereotyping and prejudice
Social categorization and stereotyping.
The influence of conscious and unconscious prejudice on behavior

Reducing stereotypes and prejudice
Motivational Approaches
Intergroup Contact

The effect of prejudice and stereotypes on the self
Body Image
Education

Discrimination & Distress

Community & Resiliency

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

The primary objective of this course is to familiarize students with the theoretical and empirical research related to issues of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.  However, this course is also designed to help students with several other skills in regards to critical thinking, sensitivity, and cultural competency.  These learning outcomes are outlined below:

 

Learning Outcomes

1.  Ability to analyze theory and data interpretation.

2.  Promote awareness of and sensitivity to, cultural diversity.

3.  Understand social scientific methodology.

4.  Ability to respectfully engage in sensitive and/or controversial discussion.

 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
ParticipationBecause this is a discussion-based seminar students are expected to participate regularly in class. Participation includes asking questions, answering questions, responding to other students, and being prompt and engaged in class. Each week students can earn up to 2 points of participation, for a total of 10 points.6%
Short papers (2 total)These papers provide you with the opportunity to reflect on, critique, integrate your readings. All papers should be typed and double-spaced (length will vary by assignment). Papers are due June 5th and June 20th .Grades will be based on the depth of thought and analysis. 20 points per paper for a total of 40 points. 27%
PresentationEach student will present on contemporary research in the field. The presentation can focus on a particular group or domain, and should go beyond what we have already discussed in class. Presentations are on June 13th. 30 points. 20%
Photovoice presentationThe final project for this class will be a Photovoice presentation. This presentation will require you to capture one of the themes of the class through photos. Each student will have 15 minutes (5 presentations per day) to show the class the photos (Powerpoint usually works well) and lead a discussion. More details about the photovoice project will be given later in the semester. 30 points.20%
Final ExamThe final exam consists of several essay questions that assesses students’ abilities to synthesize the theories we have learned throughout the semester. 40 points.27%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
A90-100%
B80-89%
C70-79%
D60-69%
FLess than 60%

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
 Participation is key in this class.  Much of the class’ success hinges upon you and your participation and preparation.  As such, students are expected to attend classes regularly and promptly.  For each absence (over three) your grade will be dropped half of a letter grade. If a student is more than 15 minutes late to a class, this will count as an absence.  Also note that you are responsible for all announcements made in class whether or not you are in attendance.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

Motivational approaches to stereotyping and prejudice

 

 

5/27: Welcome & Introductions

 

___________________________________________________________________________

5/28: Self-enhancement and prejudice

Gay, R. (2014). Peculiar Benefits (pg. 15-19); Bad Feminist take one (pg. 303-313); Bad Feminist take two (pg. 314-318). In Bad Feminist. New York, NY: Harper Collins.

___________________________________________________________________________

5/29: Rationalizing existing stereotypes

Fein, S., & Spencer, S. (1997).  Prejudice as self-image maintenance: Affirming the self through derogating others.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 31-44.

___________________________________________________________________________

5/30: Rationalizing existing stereotypes (Cont.)

Glick, P. & Fiske, S. T. (2001). An ambivalent alliance: Hostile and benevolent sexism as complementary justifications for gender inequality. American Psychologist, 56, 109-118.

**Journal 1 Due**

___________________________________________________________________________

WEEK 2

Cognitive approaches to stereotyping and prejudice

 

6/3: Social categorization and stereotyping.

Cuddy, A. J. C., Fiske, S. T., & Glick, P. (2004). When professionals become mothers, warmth doesn’t cut the ice. Journal of Social Issues, 60, 701-718.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/4: The influence of conscious and unconscious prejudice on behavior

       

Lott, B. (2002). Cognitive and behavioral distancing from the poor. American Psychologist, 57(2), 100-110.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/5: The influence of conscious and unconscious prejudice on behavior (cont.)

DeSteno, D., Dasgupta, N., Bartlett, M. Y., & Cajdric, A. (2004). Prejudice from thin air: The effect of emotion on automatic intergroup attitudes. Psychological Science, 15, 319-324.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/6: The influence of conscious and unconscious prejudice on behavior (cont.)

MOVIE: Fire at Sea

**Journal 2 Due**

___________________________________________________________________________

WEEK 3

Reducing stereotypes and prejudice

 

6/10: Motivational Approaches

Pettigrew, T. F., Tropp, L. R., Wagner, U., & Christ, O. (2011). Recent advances in intergroup contact theory.  International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 35, 271-280.

___________________________________________________________________________

The effect of prejudice and stereotypes on the self

 

6/11 Body image

Green, A. (2014). How Growing Up in a Wheelchair Affected My Body Image

Cohen-Rottenberg, R. (2015). Where Are All the Disabled People in the Body Positivity Campaigns?

 

**Bring an advertisement to class that might impact viewers’ body image**

___________________________________________________________________________

6/12: Education

Spencer, B. & Castano, E. (2007).  Social class is dead, long live social class! Stereotype threat among low-socioeconomic individuals. Social Justice Research, 20, 418-432.

Presentations

___________________________________________________________________________

6/13: Presentations

___________________________________________________________________________

WEEK 4

Complexities of Community

6/17: Backlash

Fischer, A. R. (2006). Women’s benevolent sexism as reaction to hostility. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 30, 410-416.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/18: Discrimination & distress

Yip, T., Gee, G. C., & Takeuchi, D. T. (2008). Racial discrimination and psychological distress: The impact of ethnic identity and age among immigrant and United States-born Asian adults.  Developmental Psychology, 44, 787-800.

Gay, R. (2014). A tale of three coming out stories. In Bad Feminist (pg. 160-169). New York, NY: Harper Collins.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/19: Distress & well-being

Feinberg, L. (1993).  Stone Butch Blues.  Ithaca, NY: Firebrand Books.  Read pp. 5-63.

___________________________________________________________________________

6/20: Community

Movie: Breaking Free

**Journal 3 Due**

__________________________________________________________________________

WEEK 5

Resilience & Support

6/24: Resilience & Community

Feinberg, L. (1993).  Stone Butch Blues.  Ithaca, NY: Firebrand Books.  Read pp. 155-179.

TV Show: Master of None (Thanksgiving)

__________________________________________________________________________

6/25: Resilience & Community

Feinberg, L. (1993).  Stone Butch Blues.  Ithaca, NY: Firebrand Books.  Read pp. 247-end.

__________________________________________________________________________

6/26: Photovoice Presentations

__________________________________________________________________________

6/27: Photovoice Presentations

__________________________________________________________________________

6/28:  Final Exam

 

 

SessionSession FocusReading AssignmentOther AssignmentMeeting Place/Exam Dates
SEPT 4, 6INTRODUCTIONGlennon, Why the Security Council Failed  
SEPT 11, 13WESTPHALIAN MODEL AND UN CHARTER SYSTEMTues: Cassese, pp. 1-6, 12-17, 22-32, 39-45; Thurs: Cassese, pp. 317-338   
SEPT 18, 20, 21SOURCES OF IL: custom, treaty, jus cogensTues: Cassese, pp. 153-160, 165-169; Thurs: Cassese, pp. 170-175; Fri: Cassese, pp.198-212   
OCT 25, 27JUS AD BELLUM   
OCT 2, 4JUS AD BELLUM   
OCT 9, 11MIDTERM WEEK   
OCT 16, 18JUS IN BELLO   
OCT 23, 25, 30HUMAN RIGHTS   
NOV 6, 8INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW   
NOV 13, 15, 20JURISDICTION AND IMMUNITY   
NOV 20PAPER DUE   
NOV 27, 29INTERNATIONAL LAW IN NATIONAL LEGAL SYSTEMS   
DEC 4, 6FINAL LECTURE AND REVIEW