JCU Logo

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "HS 379"
COURSE NAME: "European Intellectual History"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2021
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Luca De Caprariis
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: Junior Standing; Corequisite: EN 110
OFFICE HOURS: T;TH 10:00-10:30, 16:15-16:45

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will examine the European cultural and intellectual experience from the 1870s. Positivism, Liberalism, Idealism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, and Existentialism will be discussed, focusing on the relation between ideas and arts, politics, and economics. We will pursue a number of themes, including the emergence of distinct class identities, religion, and morality, new forms of nationalism, and the changing nature of selfhood. Special attention will be given to the "crisis of the end of the century," the transformation of political and social thought, and the rise of authoritarian and totalitarian idelogies.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirement for History majors.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
There will be two class meetings per week. Lectures will be followed by questions and discussion. Students should come to class prepared, completing the assigned readings before each class meeting.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students should develop a firm grasp of the main ideas and currents which determined European intellectual life from the end of the 1800's to the post World War II period.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Magic MountainThomas MannVintage Classics9780749386429 new edition
Death in VeniceThomas MannWW Norton & Co9780393960136  
The Culture of Western Europe: The Nineteenth and Twentieth CenturyGeorge L. MosseWestwiew Press978-0813306230 third edition
The Captive MindCzeslaw MiloszPenguin Modern Classics9780141186764  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
in-class midterm examessay exam: students will answer two essay questions25%
in-class final examessay exam: students will answer two essay questions35%
paperstudents will submit one 12 page paper30%
in class participation, paper discussion 10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance is mandatory. Students should keep their mobile phones turned off during lecture. You may use your laptop, but you are not allowed to surf the web during class. Should you fail to follow these rules I will ban laptop from classroom altogether.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Schedule of Topics

Part I: The Intellectual foundation of the 1800's

The Enlightenment 

Romanticism. I
"The primacy of feelings” 
 Nationalism. 
MC: 11-84 

 Romanticism. I
"The primacy of feelings”
Nationalism.
MC: 11-84

 Liberalism and Conservatism. 
MC: 101-146. 

Hegel and Idealism. 
MC: 147-158 

Socialism and Marxism. 
MC: 159-177  
MC: 179-202 
Pipes 1-20.

Positivism: the idea of progress and the Science of Society. 

MC: 203-216 

The century of the bourgeoisie: The making of Middle Class Culture I. 

Gay, Schnitzler’s Century 

Midterm Examination

The century of the bourgeoisie: The making of Middle Class Culture II. 
Gay, Schnitzler’s Century 

Part II: The Crisis of the Fin de siècle.

I. Literature and Art 
 MC: 219-236, Shorske 

II.  Nietzsche

III: Racism and the Emergence of Volkish culture. 

MC: 85-99; 237-249. 

III. Dissolving Certainties. Freud. 
MC 251-293 

Mann, Death in Venice

Mann, The Magic Mountain 

Paper Presentation 


Paper Presentation 

 
Part III: World War I and the Rise of New Totalitarian Views. 

I. Elitism and the Rejection of Liberalism. Pareto and Juenger. 

MC 297-341 .

II The culture of Italian Fascism 
MC: 343-357 

II Nazi Culture: Intellectual Life in the Third Reich 
MC: 359-376

Soviet Communism: Leninsm and Stalinism 
MC: 377-393.

Part IV: After World War II: the End of European Culture?

Existentialism.
MC: 395-421

After WWII. Intellectual life in Eastern and Western Europe
MC: 395-421  Milosz, The Captive Mind

After WWII. Intellectual life in Eastern and Western Europe
MC: 395-421