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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CMS 353"
COURSE NAME: "Women in Film"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2021
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Kwame Phillips
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 1:30 PM 3:30 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course introduces the issues that feminist theories pose for the analysis of films and culture. These issues are usually framed in reference to women’s access to and roles in the production of media and women’s representation within these media. Correspondingly, the course offers two major sections of investigation. First, we will explore the historical development of women’s roles in the cinema as creative artists. Second, we will explore the various ways in which women’s roles in the film industry intersect with the wider identity political issues of race, class, sexuality, and national identity.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The course is divided into weekly screenings and lectures of films created primarily by film/video/media makers who self identify as women. You will have the opportunity to develop and write a final essay on a germane topic of your choice, and to use this text to construct a final video essay.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

This course will introduce key issues that feminist theories pose for the analysis of films and contemporary culture, emphasizing radical gestures in form, identity, fantasy and agency, and provide a solid overview of the history of women’s place in film, both in front of and behind the camera. By the end of the term, students will be able to employ various critical perspectives in order to analyze how a film represents gender and sexuality, will be able to critique and evaluate an author’s thesis about the relations between feminism and film. 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Attendance and Participation 10
Screening notes and weekly observations 5
Literature review 15
Draft 10
Research journal 5
Video Essay Design 5
Final research project 30
Final video essay 20

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Attendance and punctuality are absolutely crucial. Unexcused absences will result in an F (Fail) grade for Attendance & Participation. More than 5 unexcused absences will result in failing the course. If unexcused, a tardy of more than 10 minutes will be counted as an absence. Screenings are mandatory and cannot be guaranteed to be available outside of class.

-GRADING RUBRIC

Papers will be graded using the following criteria (and judged whether excellent, good, fair, needs work or insufficient):

1. Formatting (page numbers, bibliography, quotes, citations)
2. Sources (diverse, academic)
3. Organization (good transitions, definitions, structured argument)
4. Adherence to assignment guidelines (follows instructions, answers questions, covers topic) 5. Clarity (thesis stated and supported with examples, evidence, background, context)
6. Understanding terms and grasp of concepts
7. Originality
8. Style (readable, lucid, flow, makes sense, creative, academic, command of English)
9. Grammar, spelling, typos, sentence structure
10. Effort, passion, interest

EXPLANATION OF GRADES

Grading will be done with letter grades using the 4.0 system. At present, Moodle calculates this as a percentage, so a B is 3.0 and shows as 75% (3.0 out of 4.0). This means that percentages that you may be used to will not translate in the same way. The table below indicates how the grades are calculated.

A :: 4.0 :: 100%
A-  :: 3.7 :: 93%
B+ :: 3.3 :: 83%
B   :: 3.0 :: 75%
B-  :: 2.7 :: 68%
C+ :: 2.3 :: 58%
C   :: 2.0 :: 50%
C-  :: 1.7 :: 43%
D+ :: 1.3 :: 33%
D   :: 1.0 :: 25%
D-  :: 0.7 :: 18%
F    :: 0.0 :: 0%

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Unit 1: Women’s Films and The Woman’s Film

1.   MON, SEPT. 2: INTRODUCTIONS, CLASS POLICIES, CLASS EXPECTATIONS


Screenings
The Cabbage Fairy (Dir: Alice Guy-Blaché, France. 1896. 1 min.)
Christopher Strong (Dir: Dorothy Arzner, USA. 1936. 78 min.)

Video Essays
Alice Guy-Blaché: The First Filmmaker Nobody's Heard Of (Fandor, 2017. 4 min.)
Frame by Frame: Alice Guy-Blaché (Wheeler Winston Dixon, 2010. 3 min)

For next class read:

Karen Kay and Gerald Peary, "Interview with Dorothy Arzner,” in Dorothy Arzner: Towards a Feminist Cinema (BFI, 1975)

Jacquelyn Suter, “Feminine Discourse in Christopher Strong”. Feminism and Film Theory. Ed. Constance Penley. New York: Routledge, 1988. 89-103.

2.   WED, SEPT. 4: HISTORY OF THE FEMALE FILMMAKER

Screening (contd.)
Christopher Strong (Dir: Dorothy Arzner, USA. 1936. 78 min.)

Clips
Hypocrites (Dir: Lois Weber, USA. 1915)
The Smiling Madame Beudet (Dir: Germaine Dulac, France. 1923.)
Female (Dir: Michael Curtiz, USA. 1933)
Baby Face (Dir: Alfred Green, USA. 1933)
Stella Dallas (Dir: King Vidor, USA. 1937)
Dance, Girl, Dance (Dir: Dorothy Arzner, USA. 1940)
Miss Representation (Dirs: Jennifer Siebel Newsom and Kimberlee Acquaro, USA, 2011)

Video Essays
The Herstory of the Female Filmmaker (Dir: Kelly Gallagher, USA. 2011. 15 min.)
Retrospectiva ''Dorothy Arzner'' (SSIFF, 2014. 3 min.)

3.   MON, SEPT. 9: Screening

All That Heaven Allows (Dir: Douglas Sirk, USA. 1955. 89 min)

For next class read:

Mick LaSalle, “Introduction”. Complicated Women. Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2002. 1-9.

Molly Haskell, "The Woman's Film," Feminist Film Theory. A Reader. New York: NYU, 1999, pp. 14-20.

Annette Kuhn, “Women’s Genres: Melodrama, Soap Opera and Theory”. Screen 25:1, 1984, pp. 18-28.

Optional Readings:

Judith Mayne, "Female Authorship Reconsidered,” The Woman at the Keyhole: Feminism and Women’s Cinema (Indiana University Press, 1990), 89-123.

Jeanine Basinger, “The Genre” in A Woman’s View. How Hollywood Spoke to Women, 1930-1960. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993, pp. 3-23.

4.   WED, SEPT. 11: CLASSICAL HOLLYWOOD AND THE WOMAN'S FILM

Clips

It Happened One Night (Dir: Frank Capra, USA. 1934)
Imitation of Life (Dir: John. M. Stahl, USA,.1934)
Jezebel (Dir: William Wyler, USA, 1938)
Gone with the Wind (Dir: Victor Fleming, USA, 1939)
The Lady Eve (Dir: Preston Sturges, USA, 1941)
Mildred Pierce (Dir: Michael Curtiz, USA, 1945)
Adam's Rib (Dir: George Cukor, USA, 1949)
All About Eve (Dir: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, USA, 1950)

Video Essay
White Melodrama: An Appreciation of Douglas Sirk (RubyTuesday717, 2011, 3 min)

Unit 2: The Gaze

5.   MON, SEPT. 16: Screening


Vertigo (Dir: Alfred Hitchcock, USA, 1958. 129 min.)

For next class read:

Laura Mulvey “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. New York: Oxford UP, 1999: 833-44.

Tania Modleski, “Feminity by Design”. The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory. New York: Methuen, 1988. 87-100.

Daisy Sheridan, “Judy, Please! It can’t matter to you!” Spectator desire beyond The Male Gaze and Vertigo, 2016.

Optional Readings/Viewing:

E. Ann Kaplan, “Hollywood, Science, and Cinema: The Imperial and the Male Gaze in Classic Film” (56- 98)

Mandy Merck, "Mulvey’s Manifesto". Camera Obscura 66, V.22, n. 3 (2007): 1-23.

6.   WED, SEPT. 18: THE (WHITE) MALE GAZE

Video Essays

A Male Eye. John Berger (Dir: Marina Trigueros, Spain, 3 min)
Vertigo is the Ultimate Male Gaze movie (Guy Maddin, USA, 3 min)
Framing Megan Fox (Lindsay Ellis, 14 min)

7.   MON, SEPT. 23: Screening

She’s Gotta Have It (Dir: Spike Lee. USA, 1986, 84 min)

For next class read:

bell hooks “‘Whose Pussy is This’: A Feminist Comment” (1989)

Felly Nkweto Simmonds, “‘She’s Gotta Have It’: The Representation of Black Female Sexuality on Film”; Feminist Review, No. 29 (Summer, 1988), pp. 10-22.

Salamishah Tillet “A New ‘She’s Gotta Have it’: Spike Lee’s Feminist Breakthrough,” NYTimes, 2017.

8.   WED, SEPT. 25: THE (BLACK) MALE GAZE

Clips

She’s Gotta Have It (Netflix, 2017)

9.   MON, SEPT. 30: Screening

Daughters of the Dust (Dir: Julie Dash. USA, 1991, 113 min)

For next class read:

bell hooks, “‘The Oppositional Gaze’: Black Female Spectators,” in Black Looks: Race and Representation. (Boston: South End Press, 1992), 115-31.

Laura Gaither, “Close‐up and slow motion in Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust,” Howard Journal of Communications, Volume:7, Issue:2

Stephanie Phillips, Beyoncé vs Daughters of the Dust: How an American indie classic inspired Lemonade (bfi.org.uk, 2017)

Optional Readings:

Angeletta K. M. Gourdine, Fashioning the Body [as] Politic in Julie Dash's "Daughters of the Dust," African American Review, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Autumn, 2004), pp. 499-511

Gertrud Koch, “Why Women Go to the Movies”. Jump Cut 27 (July 1982): 51-53.

10. WED, OCT. 2: FEMALE SPECTATORSHIP AND AUTHORSHIP

Clips

Richard Brody on Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust” (newyorker.com, 2015)
Lemonade (Beyoncé, 2016)

11. MON, OCT. 7: Screening

Near Dark (Dir: Kathryn Bigelow. USA, 1997. 95 min)

For next class read:

Ann E. Kaplan, “Is the Gaze Male?” Women & Film. Both Sides of the Camera. London and New York: Routledge, 1983. 23-35.

Pahull Bains, What Is the Female Gaze, and Can It Reshape Pop Culture? (fashionmagazine.com, 2019)

Optional Readings:

Amanda Hughes, Broad Cinema: THE BAD BATCH and The Rise Of The Female Gaze (birthmoviesdeath.com, 2017)

Janice Loreck, “Explainer: what does the 'male gaze' mean, and what about a female gaze?” (The Conversation, 2016)

Christine Gledhill, “Pleasurable Negotiations”. Female Spectators: Looking at Film and Television. Ed. Pribram, E. Deirdre. London and New York: Verso, 1988. 64-77.

12. WED, OCT. 9: FEMALE GAZE

Clips

Removed (Dir: Naomi Uman, USA, 2001)
Cameraperson (Dir: Kirsten Johnson, 2016)
Jill Soloway, The Female Gaze lecture (TIFF, 2017)

Video Essays
The New Canon: 'Meek's Cutoff' (Fandor, 2018, 5 min)
Fe/Male Gaze (Dir: Amanda Tingley, 2018, 5 min)

Unit 3: The New Wave

13. MON, OCT. 14: Screening


Daisies (Dir: Věra Chytilová. Czechoslovakia, 1974, 74 min)

For next class read:

Michelle Citron, et al.,” Women and Film: A Discussion of Feminist Aesthetics," Feminism and Film Theory. Ed. Constance Penley. New York: Routledge, 1988. pp. 89-103.

Sue Thornham, “Forerunners and beginnings”. Passionate Detachments. An Introduction to Feminist Film Theory. London: Arnold, 1997. 1-21.

Lauren Rabinovitz, “Maya Deren and an American Avant-garde Cinema”. Points of Resistance: Women, Power & Politics in the New York Avant-garde cinema, 1943-1971. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 2003. 49-65.

Optional Readings/Viewing:

Sharon Smith, “The Image of Women in Film: Some Suggestions for Future Research”. Feminist Film Theory. A Reader. Ed. Sue Thornham. New York: NYU, 1999. 14-19.

Contemporary Reel Women (Reel Herstory Series) (2014) (Kanopy)

14. WED, OCT. 16: THE NEW WAVE WOMAN

Clips

The Seashell and the Clergyman (Dir: Germaine Dulac, France. 1927)
Meshes of The Afternoon (Dir: Maya Deren, USSR/USA. 1943)
At Land (Dir: Maya Deren, USSR/USA. 1946)
Cléo from 5 to 7 (Dir: Agnes Varda, France. 1961)
Vagabond (Dir: Agnes Varda, France. 1985)
Footnotes to a House of Love (Dir: Laida Lerxtundi, Basque/USA. 2017)

Video Essays
Mathematical Beauty: Visual Music by Mary Ellen Bute (Dir: Laura Ivins, 2017, 3 min)
Agnès Varda and the Makings of a Film Movement (Fandor, 2018, 4 min)

15. MON, OCT. 21: Screening

One Sings, the Other Doesn't (Dir: Agnes Varda. France, 1976. 120 min)

For next class read:

Claire Johnston, “Womenʼs Cinema as Counter Cinema”. Notes on Women's Cinema, London: Society for Education in Film and Television. 1975. Rpt in Sue Thornham (ed.), Feminist Film Theory. A Reader, Edinburgh U. P.1999, 31-40.

Alison Butler, “From Counter-Cinema to Minor Cinema” in The Contested Screen. London: Wallflower, 2002, 1-23.

Ann-Sargent Wooster, “The Way We Were”, from The First Generation, Women and Video 1970-75, Independent Curators Incorporated

Optional Readings:

Janet McCabe, “Structuring a Language of Theory”. Feminist Film Studies. Writing the Woman into Cinema. London: Wallflower, 2004, 14-36.

Christine Gledhill, “Developments in Feminist Film Criticism”. Re-vision. Essays in Feminist Film Criticism. Eds. Mary Ann Doane, Patricia Mellencamp and Linda Williams. Los Angeles: AFI, 1984, 18-45.

Jane Gaines, “Women and Representation”, in Patricia Erens, ed. Issues in Feminist Film Criticism. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1990, 75-92.

16. WED, OCT. 23: COUNTERCINEMA

Clips

Fuses (Dir: Carolee Schneeman, USA, 1969, 22 min)
Wanda (Dir: Barbara Loden, USA, 1970)
Near the Big Chakra (Dir: Anne Severson, USA, 1972, 17 min)
Fake Fruit Factory (Dir: Chick Strand, USA/Mexico,1986, 22 min)
Semiotics of the Kitchen (Dir: Martha Rosler, USA, 1975, 6 min)
Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman (Dir: Dara Birnbaum, USA 1978, 6 min)
Vertical Roll (Dir: Joan Jonas, USA, 1972, 22 min)
Gently Down the Stream (Dir: Su Friedrich, USA, 1981, 14 min)
Home Avenue (Dir: Jennifer Montgomery, USA, 1989, 17 min)
She Puppet (Dir: Peggy Ahwesh, USA, 2001, 15 min)
After Hours (Dir: Jane Campion, Australia, 1984, 24 min)
Listen (Dirs: Hamy Ramezan and Rungano Nyoni, 2014, 12 min)
Born in Flames. (Dir: Lizzie Borden. USA. 1983)

Unit 4: The Body

17. MON, OCT. 28: Screening


Ms. 45 (Dir: Abel Ferrara, USA, 1981, 81 min)

For next class read:

Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, “The Rape-Revenge Film Canon” in Rape-Revenge Films: A Critical Study, Jefferson NC: McFarland &  Company, Inc., Publishers, 2011.

Anne Billson, “How the 'rape-revenge movie' became a feminist weapon for the #MeToo generation” (The Guardian, 2018)

Anne Billson, “Does the 'female gaze' make sexual violence on film any less repugnant?” (The Guardian, 2019)

Optional Readings:

Amanda Hess, How Movies and TV Address Rape and Revenge (The New York Times, 2017)

Cara Buckley, When Rape Onscreen Is Directed by a Woman (The New York Times, 2019)

April Wolfe, Rape Choreography Makes Films Safer, But Still Takes a Toll on Cast and Crew (LA Weekly, 2017)

18. WED, OCT. 30: REVENGE/EXPLOITATION

Clips

Special topic: Rape Revenge films (What Doesn’t Kill Us podcast, 2017)

19. MON, NOV. 4: Screening

The Descent (Dir: Neil Marshall, UK. 2005. 100 min)

For next class read:

Barbara Creed, “Horror and the Monstrous-Feminine: An Imaginary Abjection”. Screen 27.1 (1986): 44-71

Carol J. Clover, “Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film”. Representations 20. Special Issue: Misogyny, Misandry, and Misanthropy. (Autumn 1987). 187-228.

Alison Gillmor, ‘Feminist Horror: Plotting Against Patriarchy’ in Herizons 29.1 (Summer 2015): 20-23, 3.

Optional Readings:

Linda Williams, “Film Bodies: Gender, Genre and Excess”. In Sue Thornham (ed). Feminist Film Theory: A Reader. New York: New York UP, 1999. 267-281.

Donato Totaro, The Final Girl: A Few Thoughts on Feminism and Horror – Offscreen, Volume 6, Issue 1 – January 2002

20. WED, NOV. 6: THE MONSTROUS-FEMININE

Clips

Rosemary’s Baby (Dir: Roman Polanski, USA. 1968)
Carrie (Dir: Brian De Palma. USA. 1976)
Suspiria (Dir: Dario Argento, Italy, 1977)
The Shining (Dir: Stanley Kubrick, USA, 1980)
Body Double (Dir: Brian De Palma. USA. 1984)
Scream (Dir: Wes Craven, USA, 1996)
A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (Dir: Ana Lily Amirpour, Iran, 2014)
The Babadook (Dir: Jennifer Kent, Australia, 2014)
Hereditary (Dir: Ari Aster, USA, 2018)
Suspiria (Dir: Luca Guadagnino, USA/Italy, 2018)

Video Essay
Siding with the Victim, Part 2: Horror Films and the War on Women (Dirs: Jed Mayer and Ken Cancelosi, 2013, 8 min)

21. MON, NOV. 11: Screening

Basic Instinct (Dir: Paul Verhoeven, USA. 1992. 128 min)

For next class read:

Kate Stables, “The Postmodern Always Rings Twice: Constructing the Femme Fatale in 90s Cinema”. Women in Film Noir. Ed. E. Ann Kaplan. London. BFI. 2007 (1978).

Jack Boozer, The Lethal Femme Fatale in the Noir Tradition. Journal of Film and Video. Vol. 51, No. 3/4, dedicated to Nina Leibman (Fall/Winter 1999/2000), pp. 20-35.

Miranda Sherwin, “Deconstructing the Male: Masochism, Female Spectatorship, and the Femme Fatale” in Fatal Attraction, Body of Evidence, and Basic Instinct. Journal of Popular Film and Television, Volume 35, 2008 - Issue 4

Optional Readings:

Julie Grossman, “Looking Forward: Deconstructing the ‘Femme Fatale’” in Rethinking the Femme Fatale in Film Noir: Ready for Her Close-Up (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Deborah Jermyn, “Rereading the Bitches from Hell: A Feminist Appropriation of the Female Psychopath.” Screen 37: 3 (Autumn 1996): 251- 267.

Helen Hanson, “The Big Seduction: Feminist Film Criticism and the Femme Fatale” in The Femme Fatale: Images, Histories, Contexts. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Elizabeth Cowie, “Film Noir and Women” in Joan Copjec (ed). Shades of Noir. New York: Verso, 1993.121-166.

22. WED, NOV. 13: THE FEMME FATALE

Clips

The Maltese Falcon (Dir: John Huston, 1941)
Double Indemnity (Dir: Billy Wilder, 1944)
The Killing (Dir: Stanley Kubrick, 1956)
Chinatown (Dir: Roman Polanski, 1974)
Body Heat (Dir: Lawrence Kasdan, 1981)
Fatal Attraction (Dir: Adrian Lyne, 1987)
Who framed Roger Rabbit (Dir: Robert Zemeckis, 1988)
Basic Instinct (Dir: Paul Verhoeven, 1992)
The Last Seduction (Dir: John Dahl, 1994)
To Die For (Dir: Gus Van Sant, 1995)
L.A Confidential (Dir: Curtis Hanson, 1997)
Gone Girl (Dir: David Fincher, 2014)

Video Essays
Of Course I'm Lying: A Tribute to Femme Fatales (ZZ, 2013, 6 min)
Fembot in a Red Dress (Alison DeFren, 2017, 13 min)

Unit 5: Gender and Sexuality

23. MON, NOV. 18: Screening


Fire (Dir: Deepa Mehta. India, 1996. 104 min)

For next class read:

Harry M, Benshoff, “From Pansies to Predators: Queer Characters in Early American Cinema” in Queer images: a history of gay and lesbian film in America, Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Pub., 2006.

Edith Becker, et al. Lesbians and Film. Jump Cut, no. 24-25, March 1981, pp. 17-21

The film that forced India to see women and sexuality in a bold new way (Women in the World, 2015)

Optional Readings:

Chris Straayer. “The Hypothetical Lesbian Heroine in Narrative Feature Film”. Multiple Voices in Feminist Film Criticism. Eds. Diane Carson, Linda Dittmar and Janice R. Welsch. U of Minnesota P, 1994. 343-357.

24. WED, NOV. 20: QUEER GIRLS

Clips

Dry Kisses Only (Dirs: Kayuclia Brooke and Jane Cottis, 1990)
Joan Does Dynasty (Dir: Joan Braderman, 1986)
Joan Sees Stars (Dir: Joan Braderman, 1993)
History Lessons (Dir: Barbara Hammer, 2000)

Video Essays
The Lesbian Gaze as a Signifier of Female Agency (Dir: Edith Gras, 2016, 4 min)
Of Love and Longing (Dir: Allain Daigle, 2018, 3 min)

25. MON, NOV. 25: Screening

Tomboy (Dir: Céline Sciamma. France, 2011, 82)

For next class read:

Judith Butler, “Gender is Burning” from Bodies That Matter. 1993

26. WED, NOV. 27: PERFORMING GENDER

Clips

Glen or Glenda (Dir: Ed Wood, USA, 1953)
Victor/Victoria (Dir: Blake Edwards, UK/USA, 1982)
Tootsie (Dir: Sydney Pollack, USA, 1982)
Paris is Burning (Dir: Jennie Livingston, USA, 1990)
Orlando (Dir: Sally Potter, UK, 1992)
The Crying Game (Dir: Neil Jordan, UK, 1992)
Mrs. Doubtfire (Dir: Chris Columbus, USA, 1993)
To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar (Dir: Beeban Gidron, USA, 1995)
Ma Vie en Rose (Dir: Alain Berliner, Belgium, 1997)
Boys Don’t Cry (Dir: Kimberly Peirce, USA, 1999)
Hedwig and the Angry Inch (Dir: John Cameron Mitchell, USA, 2001)
Bande des Fille (Girlhood) (Dir: Celine Sciamma, France, 2014)
Tangerine (Dir: Sean Baker, USA, 2015)

27. MON, DEC. 2: Screening

Heathers (Dir: Michael Lehmann. USA, 1988, 103)

For next class read:

David J. Yurman, Gotta’ Get Back in Time: Heathers as Third Wave Feminism (A Good Bad Taste, 2016)

Optional Readings:

Eva Wiseman, Heathers ushered in a new type of film, one in which schoolgirls were not simply one-dimensional caricatures (The Guardian, 2009)

Mike McPadden, Everything Millennials Need to Know About The '80s Cult Classic Heathers (VH1.com, 2016)

28. WED, DEC. 4: THE MODERN WOMXN