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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AS 141"
COURSE NAME: "Introduction to Printmaking"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2021
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: James Gardner
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: W9:00 AM 11:45 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: This class requires a course fee of €22/$30 for materials
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This introductory studio course engages students in historical and contemporary techniques of printmaking and its theory. The course positions drawing and mark-making as fundamental ways to investigate visual culture. Exploring the basic intaglio and relief processes of mono-printing, linocut and collagraph, students will heighten their sensitivity to line, color, tone, texture, transparency, layout and overall composition. This will provide students with an introduction to the creative thinking and visual exploration involved in making a multiple edition print and understanding its relevance to art, design and today's image-based culture.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

This course is structured around a series of sequential projects, visits to exhibitions, practical demonstrations and independent learning through making and thinking. Exposure to a variety of technical processes and critical theory will allow students to develop an awareness of the possibility of printmaking in contemporary art and design. Students will be expected to maintain a sketchbook where visual sources, which encompass analytical drawing, experimental mark-making, reflections on course readings and photography are collated and developed in response to stimuli. Translating visual research into resolved prints will be achieved through the demonstration of various printmaking processes coupled with students' growing critical and aesthetic judgement. Historical and contemporary references, such as the application of block prints to the textile industry, and its present day interdisciplinary potential, will be discussed to further enhance understanding of various techniques. Each assignment will conclude with a group critique.

 

Students should purchase their own basic materials such as ink, cutting tools and paper. More info will be provided in class. Estimated cost per student is 50 -100 Euros.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Demonstrate a range of both primary and secondary visualization and representation strategies.

 

Demonstrate the ability to engage with a variety of media processes and strategies of making, which enable the translation of drawings into multiple edition prints

 

Demonstrate technical proficiency in the knowledge of techniques and material and evidence an ability to use them purposefully and creatively. 

 

Demonstrate an ability to analyze and evaluate both the individual creative process and importantly the work and practice of other professional artists and designer’s relation to printmaking. 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Attendance, participation and contribution to group critiques  20
Sketchbook (developmental ideas) and Homework Tasks 40
Portfolio of final prints The balance between research and developmental work, which is collated within a sketchbook is equal to the final resulting prints. This is to highlight the importance of the creative journey and the necessity to research and develop work prior to executing final ideas. Emphasis should be placed upon creative resilience, fluency of development, visual risk taking, control of media, referencing to theory and the exploratory nature of drawing.40

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality shows excellent mastery of the course content along with exceptional levels of technical skill, artistic awareness, originality, resourcefulness, commitment, quantity of work and improvement. There has been excellent collaboration and leadership in group projects, and there have been no attendance problems.
BA highly competent level of performance with work that directly addresses the content of the course, with a good quantity of work produced.
CAn acceptable level of performance: the work shows awareness of the course content, but is very limited in quantity, quality, commitment and skill.
DThe student lacks a coherent grasp of the course material and has failed to produce much work.
FNegligent in attendance, academic honesty, engagement with the course content, or production of work.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
This introductory studio course engages students in historical and contemporary techniques of printmaking and its theory. The course positions drawing and mark-making as fundamental ways to investigate visual culture. Exploring the basic intaglio and relief processes of mono-printing, linocut and collagraph, students will heighten their sensitivity to line, color, tone, texture, transparency, layout and overall composition. This will provide students with an introduction to the creative thinking and visual exploration involved in making a multiple edition print and understanding its relevance to art, design and today's image-based culture.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Introduction to course,

‘Why printmaking, why now?’ 

 

Drawing and visualisation exercises based upon still life set up within studio. Concentrating on the use of line, tone and texture to show form.  Via a series of tasks, analytical observation, composition and media control will be discussed in relation to drawing for printmaking. 

 

ESSENTIAL READING: 

TALLMAN, S., 1996. The Contemporary Print: From Pre-Pop to Postmodern. Thames & Hudson. (page 49 - 67)

 

2

Drawing and Visualisation

Drawing exercises continued as a route to develop initial ideas for prints. Discussion and practical exercises in the use of positive and negative, tonal values and descriptive line as possible strategies for developing imagery for prints. 

 

 

HOMEWORK 1

Responding to the initial exercises within class, students should take photographic images of the still life set up within the studio, identifying a series of contrasting textures. Using a variety of drawing tools; biro pen, fine line, fibre pen, pencil, chalk etc, students should create ten 10 x 10 cm responses within their sketchbooks. Consider the thickness of the drawing tool, the angle you hold the tool, the speed and fluency with which you use it etc. In addition students should title each textural response. 

 

3

Mono printing - mark making

The lesson is devoted to experiments in mark making and painted plates. Using a range of methods and materials, students will explore pressure, ink consistency and strategies for translating drawn images into prints. Students will learn how to translate line and tonal value into a one color print. 

 

ESSENTIAL READING: 

FICK, B., GRABOWSKI, B., 2015. Printmaking: A Complete Guide to Materials & Processes. Laurence King Publishing. ISBN 1780671946 (Page 287 - 203)

 

 

HOMEWORK 2

Using black and white paper, create a series of compositions inspired by the still life set up in the studio. How can images be engineered, via cutting and joining together? Avoid simply overlapping papers. The final results should be smooth, considered and have an efficient use of positive and negative.

 

 

4

Mono printing - positive and negative / mask and reveal.

Within this lesson students will explore concepts of stylising and simplifying imagery to make stencils for the mono printing process. The lesson will be illustrated by the work of artists, such as Matisse, who have used this process within their work. Issues of economy of line and shape, linked with positive and negative and overall composition will be embedded within the lesson. 

 

HOMEWORK 3

Students should make photocopies of their mono prints and, using a variety of media, develop three further composition. Each layout and development should explicitly respond to one of the following three words; angular, edges and economical. Consider how images can be repeated, change their scale, rotated and collaged together. In addition, pay particular attention on how you join and construct elements to make a larger composition and how those elements interact with the border of the page. 

 

5

Lino cut - Textural Key 

Within this introduction to linocut lesson, students will translate their earlier ‘textural responses’ into a gridded linocut. Exploring how a variety of media and marks can be translated into a relief print, using linocut tools is essential for further development. The intrinsic nature of pressure, direction of line and atmosphere will be discussed in relation to both historical and contemporary artists. 

 

ESSENTIAL READING: 

FICK, B., GRABOWSKI, B., 2015. Printmaking: A Complete Guide to Materials & Processes. Laurence King Publishing. ISBN 1780671946 (Page 75 - 100)

 

 

Linocut - Monochrome

Based upon homework 2 exercises students will develop a composition for a monochromatic print. Technical instruction on how to transfer images from paper to lino will be given. Issues of proportion, composition and layout will be explored. 

 

 

7

Linocut - Monochrome

Completion of carving the Lino and printing multiple copies of the print. 

 

HOMEWORK 4

Development of colour studies for multi layered print. Within their sketchbooks, students should develop at least 3 possible colour developments for the next task. Consideration should be given to colour theory and colour ratio in relation to composition and visual impact. 

 

 

Lino Cut -  Multi Colour 

Class critique of homework. 

Technical demonstration on how to ‘map’ the Lino in order to organise effective carving. Students will carve and print first colour separation. 

 

 

Lino cut  - Multi Colour 

Carve and print 2nd colour separation. 

 

HOMEWORK 5

Students, within their sketchbooks, should create a series of textural drawings. Using string and glue, create a line drawing. Similarly use paper tape to create a drawing of positive and negative areas. Consider how to cut the tape and the resulting visual effect. A sharply cut piece of tape and a quickly torn edge have different visual effects. Produce a minimum of two further ‘textured’ drawings with unconventional materials. 

 

10

Lino cut  - Multi Colour 

Carve and print final color. 

Class critique of finished work.

 

11 Visit to Exhibition, which related to printmaking.

ESSENTIAL READING: 

PELZER-MONTADA, R., 2018. Perspectives on contemporary printmaking: Critical writing since 1986. Manchester University Press. (Page 78 - 90)

 

12 

Collagraph

Exploring texture and composition, students will create a paper collagraph plate, based on earlier studies. 

 

ESSENTIAL READING: 

FICK, B., GRABOWSKI, B., 2015. Printmaking: A Complete Guide to Materials & Processes. Laurence King Publishing. (Page 140 - 156)

 

 

13 

Collagraph 

Building on prior lessons, students will create a further collagraph plate. Using materials, such as fabric, string hot glue and cardboard to create a shallow relief surface.  Students will experiment with juxtaposing textures within a conceived composition, based upon earlier homework tasks. 

 

14 

Collagraph

Printing of collagraph print. 

Final Critique of project. 

 

15 

Final Exhibition