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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CW/ITS 358"
COURSE NAME: "Creative Writing Workshop: The Art of Literary Translation"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2021
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Allison Grimaldi Donahue
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 3:00 PM 4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above. IT 301 only for Italian Studies majors.
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course aims to develop the creative, editorial, and reading habits needed for literary translation; to develop an awareness of the theories associated with the practice of translating a work of literary excellence from one language into another; to foster an aesthetic sensibility for use in literary translation. Students will read and discuss theoretical texts and will create their own translations of works by authors that will be chosen by each student. These translations will be presented to the class in a traditional workshop format, with emphasis on analysis of the difficulties posed by the chosen text(s) and a justification for the choices made in rendering the texts into English. Students will compile a portfolio of the translations they produce during the term, having become familiar with the skills and sensitivities needed to translate works of literary merit and to discern the characteristics of quality literary translation.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

 



We will look at a range of translations and texts over time, analyze different choices, different methods, different contexts and different philosophies all related to translation, but even more so to writing and language itself. Translation, it has been said, reveals what all writing is. We will examine this notion, developing our own ideas about the craft or art of bringing literatures from one language and culture into another. We will examine texts from languages both familiar and foreign and students are asked to bring their capacity not only for learning but for open-mindedness and artistic experimentation.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

 

At the end of this course you will be able to:



·         Analyze and compare a work of literature in translation

·         Understand the historical and political forces at work in making a translation

·         Write a review of a work of literature in translation

·         Translate a work of prose

·         Translate a work of poetry

·         Translate a script

·         Develop a personal methodology about translation

·         Integrate various academic and theoretical discussions into your further literary studies and writing

Write with an eye and ear for form, sound, cultural context.
TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Response to translation methods essays (3)  15
Translation of fiction or non-fiction 10% 10
Translation of poetry  10
Translation of Drama 10
Portfolio with introduction  20
Pitch of a text you believe should be translated  10
Group work with visiting author and contribution to class translation  15
Participation  10

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until ____________
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

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JCU Logo


JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CW/ITS 358"
COURSE NAME: "Creative Writing Workshop: The Art of Literary Translation"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2020

SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Allison Grimaldi Donahue
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 3:00-4:15
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above. IT 301 only for Italian Studies majors.
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment



 




COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course offers students a practical and theoretical experience in the field of literary translation. Topics will include the history of literary translation, contexts, purposes and philosophies as well as a large practicum portion dedicated to various modes and methods of translation itself. Students will be required to read critically, write regularly and be prepared to share thoughts and work in workshops and discussions. Students will work towards creating a small portfolio of completed translation work by the end of the semester. Students will also be required to write on different topic related to translation studies.

 This course is both about translation and about creative writing. It is an introduction into the work of the translator for a range of literary forms: prose, poetry, drama. In addition the vocabulary and jargon of literary translation will be discussed.

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:  

We will look at a range of translations and texts over time, analyze different choices, different methods, different contexts and different philosophies all related to translation, but even more so to writing and language itself. Translation, it has been said, reveals what all writing is. We will examine this notion, developing our own ideas about the craft or art of bringing literatures from one language and culture into another. We will examine texts from languages both familiar and foreign and students are asked to bring their capacity not only for learning but for open-mindedness and artistic experimentation.

Students will also have the opportunity to work with a selected author over the course of the semester, culminating in a visit from the author to discuss the class’s work on their translation. This will be an Italian author but students should bear in mind, all levels of all languages will have their purpose and place in our classroom and students who are monolinguals or have unique language pairs are more than welcome to join this class.

The first half of the class is dedicated to theoretical and practical craft readings and small translation exercises. The second half is dedicated to a group project and longer individual projects.

Weekly writing assignments and participation in class are required and will affect your grade.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:


At the end of this course you will be able to:

·         Analyze and compare a work of literature in translation

·         Understand the historical and political forces at work in making a translation

·         Write a review of a work of literature in translation

·         Translate a work of prose

·         Translate a work of poetry

·         Translate a script

·         Develop a personal methodology about translation

·         Integrate various academic and theoretical discussions into your further literary studies and writing

·         Write with an eye and ear for form, sound, cultural context.

TEXTBOOK:

 n/a

Readings will be available with a course reader, online links and handouts. See course schedule for a list of readings.


GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:

Assignment

Response to translation methods essays (3) 15%

Three Short Translations 30%

Long translation with introduction 20%

Pitch of a text you believe should be translated 10%

Group work with visiting author and contribution to class translation 15%

Participation 10%

 


-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
A Work of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course


B This is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised. There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.


C This is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.


D This level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material. Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included. In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.


F This work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
This class is about ideas, feedback, listening and participating, which means the student is expected to attend every class and to be on time. More than four unjustified absences will make your maximum grade a B.


ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.

 

 Assignment details:

Three short translations: from 250-500 words of prose or 2 or 3 poems (of a literary text)

Three short essays: 500 words each responding to our class readings. These may include reference to practice, other texts, experience. They are informal but serious and should demonstrate understanding and reflection. Students can choose which texts to respond to and what their argument and opinion of the text.

Long Translation with Introduction:

Prose 10-15 pages, Poems 15-20 poems of a single author, must go through workshops and drafts

Introduction of 3-5 pages discussing importance, challenges, method

 

All assignments with professor’s approval

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE

Session

 Session Focus

Reading Assignment

Other Assignment

Meeting Place/Exam Dates

Week one

Introduction: What is literary translation?

Dezsö Kosztolányi, “The Kleptomaniac Translator”

Robert Bly ‘8 Stages’

Translate short passage in Teams.

Write short reflection on the Bly.

 

Week Two

The Task of the Translator

Walter Benjamin, “The Task of the Translator” Sandra Bermann, “Performing Translation

 Short Translation 1 DUE

 

Week Three

History: Translation, Comparative Literature

“The Invention of Monolingualism” Gramling

Bringing in translations you love and sharing them with the class.

Short Essay 1 DUE

 

Week Four

Language Lessons

15-minute language lessons in pairs/longer sessions for larger language groups

 

Writing your own dialect

 

Short Translation 2 DUE

 

Week Five

Three translations of one text

Caroline Bergvall ‘Via’ on the various Anglophone Dantes, Subsister, Multiples

Transgressive Circulation,Goransson

 In-Class Writing

 

Week Six

Pitching Translation Projects to Class

 

  Short Essay 2 DUE

 

Week Seven

Thick Translation in Practice Group Translations of our author

Kwame Anthony Appiah, “Thick Translation”

Short Translation 3 DUE

 

Week Eight

Spring BREAK

SPRING BREAK

Be ready with draft of your work for next week

 

 

Week Nine

Group Translations of Author/ Workshop 1


Short Essay 3 DUE

 

Week Ten

Workshop 2/3


 

 

Week Eleven

Group Translations of our author


  

 

Week Twelve

Workshop 4/5

 

 

 

Week Thirteen

Workshop 6/7

 


 

Week Fourteen

In Class Editing Session

 

 

 

Week Fifteen

Working with Guest Author

 

 

 









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