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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "IT 309"
COURSE NAME: "Italian Language Through Literature"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2020
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Anna Mauceri Trimnell
EMAIL: amauceri@johncabot.edu
HOURS: TTH 1:30-2:50 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: Placement or IT 302 or permission of the instructor
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course investigates the main linguistic transformations of the Italian language during the last century through the language of literature. A selection of some representative short stories from the 1930s to the present day will be studied. The purpose is to analyze different narrative and rhetorical techniques, to follow the progressive definition of the linguistic standard, and to identify the influence of the spoken language on written Italian. After careful reading, students will explore these stories in class discussions on the writer’s technique, style, and ideas, through the analysis of characters, plots, and the large variety of themes and structures used.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

A selection of some representative short contemporary stories will be studied. The purpose is to analyze different narrative and rhetorical techniques, to follow the progressive definition of the linguistic standard, and to identify the influence of the spoken language on written Italian.

Besides the above, knowledge of advanced grammatical structures will be constantly developed.

After careful reading, students will explore these stories in discussions about the writer’s technique, style and ideas, through the analysis of characters, plots and the large variety of themes and structures used.

There is no set textbook for this course: the professor will provide adhoc materials on a lesson by lesson basis.
 
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students will learn how to:

·      analyze language and structures of literary texts

·      identify the relevance of character, plot, and the role of the narrator

·      discuss the texts they read and talk about their reading in general

·      summarize a plot

·      use complex grammatical structures, syntax, and a wider vocabulary

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class Participation and homework:Grades will depend on both quality and frequency of participation. Collaborative work is crucial. It permits the sharing of personal comprehension and interpretation of the texts and increases the ability to interact in the target language. In order to follow the structure of the course and reach the goals, students must follow the timetable of the readings assigned as homework. 10%
Oral PresentationStudents are required to give a 10/15 min presentation of an assigned a/o chosen narrative text. Grading will take into account the organization of the discourse, the ability of summarize a story and analyze its language and structure.10%
TestsThere will be two tests to evaluate the competence of the students’ grammatical and textual analytical skills.30%
Final examThe exam will consist of a short paper and questions on grammar and textual analysis.20%
2 Compositions2 out of class Writing Assignments with rewriting after professor feedback30%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. Excellent command of the language consistent with the level of proficiency. Appropriate command of sentence structure, lexis, register and idio
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised. Good command of the language, consistent with the level of proficiency. Competent manipulation of sentence structure, with some evidence of development and complexity; small occurrence of grammatical errors. Work will be broadly coherent and comprehensible, good manipulation of sentence structure; grammatical and other errors will not impede comprehension.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited. Evidence of the ability to control the language for the purpose of effective communication, consistent with the level of proficiency. Work will be comprehensible; sentence structure will be very simple and grammatical and other errors will be frequent but not as serious to impede comprehension
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material. Little evidence of the ability to control the language for the purpose of making oneself understood. Little awareness of sentence structure and numerous grammatical and other errors.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. No evidence of the ability to control the language; failure to make oneself understood.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Regular attendance is an essential component of class participation. Students are allowed three unjustified absences. The final grade will be lowered by 1 point for each additional absence. Make sure your travel plans do not interfere with the class schedule.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE PROFESSOR’S DISCRETION.  

Homework assignments and handouts will be posted daily on Moodle.

I Week (Sept. 22, 24)

Introduction to the course.

Main characteristics of the narrative texts: the narrator and characters, point of view, dynamic and static sequences. 

Reading: a section from A. Moravia, Non approfondire

Strategies of the organization of the plot: fabula e intreccio.

Reading: Gabriele Romagnoli, L’altra.

II Week  (Sept 29, Oct 1)

Discussion about the text: Gabriele Romagnoli, L’altra.

Textual analysis: the first-person narrator.

Grammar: past tense agreement; condizionale presente and passato.

Time conjunctions

Reading: Elsa Morante, La giornata.

III Week (Oct 6, 8, 9)

Discussion about the text: Elsa Morante, La giornata

Grammar: Passato remoto. The difference between passato remoto and passato prossimo.

Textual analysis: the third person narrator. 

Uses of figurative language: similes and metaphors.

First written composition

Reading: Gianrico Carofiglio Non esiste saggezza.

IV Week (Oct 13, 15, 16)

Discussion about the text: Gianrico Carofiglio Non esiste saggezza.

The concept of right and wrong in contemporary Italian literary fiction.

Grammar: Congiuntivo Presente; conjuctions which require the subjunctive form.

V Week (Oct 20, 22)

Revision

Oct 22 Test I

Reading: Antonio Tabucchi, Il gatto dello Cheshire.

VI week (Oct 27, 29)

Discussion about the text: Antonio Tabucchi, Il gatto dello Cheshire

Grammar: Congiuntivo imperfetto e trapassato. 

Textual analysis: Points of view.

VII Week (Nov 3, 5)

Reading: Gabriele Romagnoli Donna sulle scale

Discussion about the text.

Grammar: Il gerundio modale

VIII Week (Nov 10, 12, 13) 

Revision.

Test II

Reading: Leonardo Sciascia, Il lungo viaggio

IX Week (Nov 17, 19)

Discussion about the text: Leonardo Sciascia, Il lungo viaggioWhen We Were the Immigrants. 

Grammar and textual analysis: direct, indirect speech.

X Week (Nov 24, 26)

Il lungo viaggio (cont.)

Free indirect speech

Reading: N. Ginzburg, Viaggiatori maldestri

Second written composition

XI Week  (Dec 1, 3)

Discussion about the text: N. Ginzburg, Viaggiatori maldestri

Grammar: il gerundio temporale e causale

XII week (Dec 10)

Oral presentation.

General review

December 11-14 FINAL EXAMINATIONS