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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "IT 317"
COURSE NAME: "Roots of Italian Identities"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2020
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Federica Capoferri
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 3:05-4:25 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: IT 302 or permission of the instructor
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course aims to give an insight into the linguistic, cultural and sociological complexity of the ‘notion of Italy.’ The topics studied, based primarily on literary texts, include some of the major themes of Italian culture as well as examples of the various ‘identities’ that Italy offers today: the question of political and cultural unity and the long-lasting question of a common national language; the role played by Italian intellectuals in the construction of Italy as a nation; the Mafia and the institution of family-based structures; the Italian literary canon and the contemporary ideas of culture and literature. The course is in Italian.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
The course will explore some of the major themes of Italian literary and cultural tradition such as the question of language, the engagment of literature into political discourses, the role of  intellectuals in shaping the 'Notion of Italy'. Some of the key Italian literary authors such as Dante, Petrarca, Machiavelli, Leopardi, and Pasolini will be studied to understand the historical paradigms that supported the construction of the Italian literary culture. Latest literary works and multidisciplinary materials addressing topics such as gender, post-colonial Italy, and intermediality will counterbalance the hegemonic discourse on Italy providing students with a critical awareness of the several cultural, social, and historical factors involved in the dominant artistic representations of Italy and Italianity.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completing this course, students will possess the ability to:

- Analyze language and structures of literary texts

- Identify main ideas in relationship to the historical and cultural context in which they arose

- Identify broad ideological frames of current received ideas on certain aspects of Italian culture

- Discuss the relevance of such ideas in connection with other information about topics in question

- Critically discuss Italian cultural heritage in today's world.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Ciao maschioValeria ParrellaBompiani9788845263903 Please note that on Moodle there will be a Digital Reader with all the excerpts from the required reserve readings. The only book you need to buy are V. Parrella, Ciao maschio, If you prefer the ebook, this is the ISBN 9788834604403
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Scritti corsariPier Paolo PasoliniGarzanti9788811666295  
The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian CultureZ. Baransky, R. WestCambridge UP9780521559829  
Storia d'Italia in 15 filmAlberto CrespiLaterza978 88 581 2522 9  
Contro l'identità italianaChristian RaimoEinaudi978 88 06 24161 2  

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
2 Response Papers A response paper is a short essay (4 pages, double-space) which conveys the writer's reaction to one or several texts that he or she has read. A response paper is often structured in the following way: ►In the introduction, the book(s)/article(s), etc. that has been read is introduced and the focus of the response paper is stated ►In the Body, one or several specific issues are brought up for examination ►In the Conclusion, the argument (the 'response' to the texts that have been read) is summed up and some conclusion is offered. Note that response papers are not reviews; the writer is not supposed to offer a value statement on the text that is being discussed. Instead, the response paper (which is sometimes called 'reaction paper') is a kind of critical close reading of a specific aspect of one or several texts. (edited from https://awelu.srv.lu.se/genres-and-text-types/writing-in-academic-genres/the-essay-format/response-papers/) 20%
midterm examIn-class exam composed of short questions and a critical essay25%
Class participationStudents are expected to come to class with all the assigned reading done, to engage themselves in class discussions, to pay attention to the Instructors' lectures, take notes, and ask questions 15%
oral presentation15 minutes RECORDED power point presentation on a topic previously discussed with the Instructor.10%
Final ExamA CUMULATIVE exam composed by short questions and a critical essay.30%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
More than 2 absences will result in a F in this part (10%) of your grade.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE INSTRUCTOR MIGHT NEED TO MAKE CHANGES TO THE SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 (Sept 22, 24)

 Introduction to the course. Syllabus, Course Materials, Learning Oucomes. The Notion of Italy. Sebastiano Vassalli, L’Italiano (Digital Reader on Moodle). Video and discussion Giorgio Gaber, Io non mi sento italiano.Critical readings: The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 17-33. (Digital reader on Moodle). L’Identità italiana e la storia. Conversazione con il prof. Ernesto Galli della Loggia. Il carattere del popolo italiano e la coscienza nazionale. L’eredità del Risorgimento. In Limes. Rivista di geopolitica https://www.limesonline.com/lidentita-italiana-e-la-storia/9159

WEEK 2 (Sept 29, Oct 1)

UNI I: The Question of Language. I
Dante.
De Vulgari Eloquentia, Libro I. Critical readings: The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 63-70. https://library.weschool.com/lezione/de-vulgari-eloquentia-di-dante-riassunto-e-analisi-del-testo-1314.htmlhttps://library.weschool.com/lezione/analisi-de-vulgari-eloquentia-dante-alighieri-3395.html

WEEK 3 (Oct 6, 8, 9)

UNIT: The Question of Language. II. Italian Renaissance and the literary definition of Italian Language. Pietro Bembo’s canon and the culture of imitatio.
Critical readings: Excerpts from P. Bembo, Prose della Volgar Lingua;Francesco Petrarca's Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, and ‘Petrarchisti’’s poems. (handouts on Moodle)

WEEK 4 (Oct 13, 15, 16)

UNIT: The Question of Language. III. Alessandro Manzoni and Italian Risorgimento. Giuseppe Verdi and the role of Italian Opera in shaping national identity during Risorgimento. Critical readings: Excerpts from Manzoni and Verdi’s works (handouts on Moodle); The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 70-79.

WEEK 5 (Oct 20, 22)

 RESPONSE PAPER I DUE ON OCT. 20

UNIT 2: Literature as Political Discourse. Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia: i “canti politici”. Readings: Introduzione ai canti politici (handout on moodle); Inferno, Canto VI, vv. 58-75: https://www.danteonline.it/italiano/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR; Purgatorio, Canto VI, vv. 223-228: https://www.danteonline.it/italiano/opere.asp?idope=1&idlang=OR

WEEK 6 (Oct 27, 29)

 UNIT 2: Literature as Political Discourse. II. F. Petrarca, Italia mia: https://library.weschool.com/lezione/rerum-vulgarium-fragmenta-francesco-petrarca-e-la-politica-4872.htmlN. Machiavelli, Il Principe, chapter XXVI: https://letteritaliana.weebly.com/lesortazione-finale-ai-medici.html; Critical readings:The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 35-53.

WEEK 7 (Nov 3, 5)

UNIT 2: Literature as Political Discourse. III. Giacomo Leopardi, All'Italia: https://www.studenti.it/all-italia-di-leopardi.htmlPier Paolo Pasolini, Alla mia nazione: http://www.pierpaolopasolini.it/alla_mia_nazione.htm Critical readings: The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 53-61.

WEEK 8 (Nov 10, 12, 13)

 Review for Midterm, Nov 12: Midterm Exam

 Home Screening: Mario Monicelli, La grande guerra (1959), Critical readings: Alberto Crespi, Storia d'Italia in 15 film, pp. 37-48. (Digital reader on Moodle); The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp.215-242

WEEK 9 (Nov 17, 19)

UNIT 3: Italian Intellectuals. I Pier Paolo Pasolini, Scritti corsari, chapters: “Sviluppo e progresso”, “Acculturazione e acculturazione”. (Digital reader on Moodle). Critical readings:The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture, pp. 81-91; Home screening. Pier Paolo Pasolini, Comizi d’amore https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSkOnp7Lt-Y

WEEK 10 (Nov 24, 26)

UNIT 3: Italian Intellectuals. II. Pier Paolo Pasolini, Scritti corsari, chapter “Il romanzo delle stragi”; Roberto Saviano, Gomorra, pp. 231-240. (Digital reader on Moodle). Critical readings:The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture,pp. 91-96.
Home screening: Alina Marazzi, Vogliamo anche le rose (2007). 

 WEEK 11 (Dec 1, 3)

RESPONSE PAPER 2 DUE ON DEC. 1
UNIT 4: Questioning the Italian literary tradition from gender and postcolonial perspectivesValeria Parrella, Ciao maschio (textbook); Igiaba Scego, Dismatria (Digital reader on Moodle). Critical readings: The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture,pp. 141-149.

 DEC 3: ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Home screening: Esmeralda Calabria,Andrea D'Ambrosio, Peppe Ruggiero, Biutiful cauntri (2007)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cqbz4mFrI98Critical readings: Alberto Crespi, Storia d'Italia in 15 film, pp. 235-252; Cristian Raimo, Contro l’identità italiana, 91-113.

 WEEK 12 (DEC. 10)

 Conclusions and review for Final Exam