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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 144 "
COURSE NAME: "World Art IV: Visual Culture of the Modern and Contemporary World"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Linford
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 3:00-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This survey course focuses on the art of Europe, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania from the 1700s to the present. The course investigates all media, including photography, and considers the impact of globalization and new technologies on contemporary art and evidence of cross-cultural influences. Special attention will be given to the new aesthetic languages, traditional cultural sources, and philosophical background of contemporary art, as well as to the broader cultural-historical contexts of their creation. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This survey course focuses on the art of Europe and the Americas from the 1700s to the present. The course investigates all media, with an emphasis on painting and sculpture, but includes photography and digital technologie' impact on contemporary art. Special attention will be given to the new aesthetic languages, philosophical background and historical context of modern and contemporary art. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, including but not limited to description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

-Recognize key works and issues in modern and contemporary art.

-Develop an understanding of the chronology and development of art since the 18th-century.

- Recognize and reason about the contributions of influential artists and art historians 

-Exercise critical thinking while looking, reading, writing and speaking about modern and contemporary art.

-Identify, analyze and interpret significant aspects and themes in the history of art within different social and historical contexts.

-Evaluate the ways that art as is shaped by dynamic social and cultural interactions.

-Develop technical vocabulary appropriate to the field of art history, communication and, more generally, to our image-based culture.

-Learn to visually analyze works in relation to other genres and other bodies of knowledge — scientific, political, economic, intellectual

-Formulate and develop critical and rigorous arguments, especially in essays and presentations; find and evaluate pertinent, high-quality sources and information.

-Structure and effectively communicate ideas and information orally and in writing; understand how to convey ideas and information visually.

-Develop an aptitude at visual analysis and the contextualization of works in different histories.

-Formulate an interpretative argument and draw out observations on the cultural outlook, norms and histories that influenced the production, creation and reception of the works under discussion.

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
EssayWritten essay of 2000 - 2500 words due week 14. Note that an outline a very brief bibliography and an image of the work that is the focus of the essay must be presented to the professor on week 10: 30% 30
Midterm examinationMidterm examination in class (Definitions, image identifications, slide comparisons and brief analytical essays): 25% 25
Final examinationFinal examination in class (Definitions, image identifications, comparisons and brief analytical essays): 25% 25
Attendance and class participationAttendance and class participation Contribution to class discussions and reviews:10% 10
QuizzesQuizzes on reading assignments and previous lectures (in-class pop quizzes): 10%10

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Week 1.1: Course introduction: scope, issues, requirements.

 

Week 1.2: Histories of modern art — on evolution and teleology.

 

Week 2.1: Academies and the Grand Tour: norms, rules and networks

 

Week 2.2: Revolution!

 

Week 3.1: Neoclassicism (1)

 

Week 3.2: Neoclassicism (2)

 

Week 4.1: Romanticism (1)

 

Week 4.2: Romanticism (2)

 

 

Week 5.1: Naturalism and Realism

 

Week 5.2: Academic and “independent” art 

 

Week 4.2: Impressionism

 

Week 5.1: Post-Impressionism

 

Week 5.2: Fauvism

 

Week 6.1: Expressionism

 

Week 6.2: Cubism

 

Week 7.1: Futurism

 

Week 7.2: Midterm review and paper workshop

 

Week 8.1: Midterm examination

 

Week 8.2: Constructivism and Suprematism

 

Week 9.1: Dada, Duchamp and Art between the two World Wars

 

Week 9.2: Surrealism

 

Week 10.1: Abstract Expressionism

 

Week 10.2: Pop Art

 

Week 11.1: Minimalism and Conceptual Art

 

Week 11.2: Site-Specific and Environmental Art

 

Week 12.1: Happenings, Performance art and the politics of institutional critique

 

Week 12.2: The Return of Painting and Figuration

 

Week 13.1: Post-modern practices (1)

 

Week 13.2: Post-modern practices (1)

 

Week 14.1: The Cutting Edge - Contemporary trends

 

Week 14.2: Course Review 

 

Week 15: Final Exam

 

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

 

AH 144 -World Art IV

Visual Culture of the Modern and Contemporary World

 

Instructor: Dr. Sarah Linford

[email protected]

 

Hours/place:  MW 3:00 PM 4:15 PM (note makeup Fridays)

Classroom: tbd

 

TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45 

CREDITS: 3 

PREREQUISITES: none

 

OFFICE HOURS:

Wednesday after class and/or by appointment.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

This survey course focuses on the art of Europe and the Americas from the 1700s to the present. 

Special attention will be given to the new aesthetic languages, techniques, philosophical background and historical context of modern and contemporary art. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis. The course is organized chronologically and, throughout, will probe what modernism means and it relates to over three centuries’ revolutions in the organization of daily life, of social organization, commercial development, political and cultural identity, and how art both reflects and impacts this evolution Through an analysis of the art, artists, and critical discourses in question, the course will consider the fundamental questions: what is art’s relationship to the larger culture? What is the artist’s role in society? What do aesthetic concerns have to do with life? While these questions are always pertinent, they demand particular attention in these centuries increasingly defined by the ideology of art’s autonomy, pure creativity, and individual expression. Extensive visual analysis will be accompanied by attention to the critical discourses with which modern and contemporary aesthetics were defined or contested, giving students the chance to develop an understanding of key modern and contemporary art movements but also to learn how these styles are part and parcel of our history.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

-Recognize key works and issues in modern and contemporary art.

-Develop an understanding of the chronology and development of art since the 18th-century.

- Recognize and reason about the contributions of influential artists and art historians 

-Exercise critical thinking while looking, reading, writing and speaking about modern and contemporary art.

-Identify, analyze and interpret significant aspects and themes in the history of art within different social and historical contexts.

-Evaluate the ways that art as is shaped by dynamic social and cultural interactions.

-Develop technical vocabulary appropriate to the field of art history, communication and, more generally, to our image-based culture.

-Learn to visually analyze works in relation to other genres and other bodies of knowledge — scientific, political, economic, intellectual

-Formulate and develop critical and rigorous arguments, especially in essays and presentations; find and evaluate pertinent, high-quality sources and information.

-Structure and effectively communicate ideas and information orally and in writing; understand how to convey ideas and information visually.

-Develop an aptitude at visual analysis and the contextualization of works in different histories.

-Formulate an interpretative argument and draw out observations on the cultural outlook, norms and histories that influenced the production, creation and reception of the works under discussion.

 

Week 1.1: Course introduction: scope, issues, requirements.

 

Week 1.2: Histories of modern art — on evolution and teleology.

 

Week 2.1: Academies and the Grand Tour: norms, rules and networks

 

Week 2.2: Revolution!

 

Week 3.1: Neoclassicism (1)

 

Week 3.2: Neoclassicism (2)

 

Week 4.1: Romanticism (1)

 

Week 4.2: Romanticism (2)

 

 

Week 5.1: Naturalism and Realism

 

Week 5.2: Academic and “independent” art 

 

Week 4.2: Impressionism

 

Week 5.1: Post-Impressionism

 

Week 5.2: Fauvism

 

Week 6.1: Expressionism

 

Week 6.2: Cubism

 

Week 7.1: Futurism

 

Week 7.2: Midterm review and paper workshop

 

Week 8.1: Midterm examination

 

Week 8.2: Constructivism and Suprematism

 

Week 9.1: Dada, Duchamp and Art between the two World Wars

 

Week 9.2: Surrealism

 

Week 10.1: Abstract Expressionism

 

Week 10.2: Pop Art

 

Week 11.1: Minimalism and Conceptual Art

 

Week 11.2: Site-Specific and Environmental Art

 

Week 12.1: Happenings, Performance art and the politics of institutional critique

 

Week 12.2: The Return of Painting and Figuration

 

Week 13.1: Post-modern practices (1)

 

Week 13.2: Post-modern practices (1)

 

Week 14.1: The Cutting Edge - Contemporary trends

 

Week 14.2: Course Review 

 

Week 15: Final Exam