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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "HS 211-2"
COURSE NAME: "Twentieth-Century Europe and the World "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Niccolò Serri
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 8:30-9:45 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Recommended: HS 210
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from World War I through the aftermath of the Cold War. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of twentieth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the experience and significance of the World Wars and the Cold War, the development of democratic, authoritarian, and 'totalitarian' political systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.

Satisfies "Modern History" core course requirements for History majors.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The 20th century is usually considered as the last European century: building on its political and technological advances, Europe reached its apogee at the beginning of the nineteen hundreds. The outbreak of the First World War, however, opened to decades of internal conflict, economic transformation and social turmoil for European states. This culminated in the political violence of totalitarian regimes and the Second World War, leaving the old continent in shambles. As Europe grappled with the violence of this dark century, its development was dwarfed by the rise of new powers, the United States and Soviet Russia, and the global stirring of the colonial world. After 1945, European states and their citizens had to adjust to a new world system, discovering a spirit of unity in the context of Cold War competition and coping with new social demands. 

The course will be divided in two parts: one covering the period between the late XIX century and 1945, the other from 1945 onwards. Each part will comprise of two sections, A and B, corresponding to the thematic organization of course content. 


Classes will be held twice a week. Each class will comprise a short lecture part and an open discussion on the historiography of the subject covered. It is thus essential that students come prepared to class.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
In the first part, students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the period between the outbreak of the First World War and the demise of Nazism, investigating the political, economic and cultural aspects of the troubled interwar years. Particular attention will be given to the competition between liberal democracy, Fascism and Communism. 

In the second part, students will learn how Europe fit into the larger Cold War system, together with its international and domestic aspects: the so-called Golden age of European democracies, followed by crisis of the 1970s, the effects of superpower competition and the rise of third world countries to the global stage. 

The course will develop students’ analytical tools and foster their capacity for critical thinking, teaching them (i) how to approach archival and edited primary sources, and (ii) compare and contrast different historiographical interpretations on Twentieth century European history. Furthermore, (iii) the essay format of the midterm and final exams will train students’ ability to develop coherent historical arguments.    


TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth EditionRobert O. Paxton and Julie HesslerWadsworth Cengage LearningISBN-10: 9780495913191; ISBN-13: 978-0495913191  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Dark continent : Europe's twentieth centuryMark Mazower Penguin Press0713991593 9780713991598 0140241590 9780140241594  
Age of extremes : the short twentieth century, 1914-1991Eric HobsbawmAbacus9780349106717 0349106711  
Postwar : a history of Europe since 1945Tony JudtPimlico0712665641 9780712665643  
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class participationStudents are expected to attend every class and prepare the assigned readings beforehand, so as to participate in class discussion.10%
Midterm examStudents will answer two questions, out of a total of six, from both (A) and (B).25%
Individual paperSubmission of a twelve-page paper on a topic to be discussed with the instructor, based on supplementary readings and edited primary sources.30%
Final examThe final exam will cover both the first and second part of the course. Students will answer three questions, out of a total of nine, from both (A) and (B).35%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed.

Attendance is mandatory. Students should keep their mobile phones turned off during lecture. You may use your laptop to take notes, but you are not allowed to surf the web during class. Should you fail to follow these rules I will ban laptops from classroom altogether
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

SessionSession FocusReading AssignmentOther AssignmentMeeting Place/Exam Dates
Sept. 2The age of empires (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 3-36.  
Sept. 4Origins of the First World War (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 41-63 AND / OR David Stevenson, The Outbreak of the First World War: 1914 in perspective, MacMillan, Basingstoke and London, 1997, pp. 2-38 (moodle)   
Sept. 9The course of the First World War (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 63-105.  
Sept. 11Revolution in the Old World: the Soviet Union and beyond (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 107-137 AND/OR Eric Hobsbawm, Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century, 1914-1991, Abacus, London, 1995, pp. 54-78 (moodle)  
Sept. 16The Great Illusion: the Treaty of Versailles and its revisions (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 141-176 AND/OR Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century, Penguin Books, London, 1998, pp. 40-76 (moodle)  
Sept. 18Italian and European Fascism (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 179-199, 225-227.  
Sept. 23The Great Depression: the US, Europe and the world (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 261-277 AND Ben S. Bernanke: Money, gold and the Great Depression, Remarks by Mr Ben S Bernanke, Member of the Board of Governors of the US Federal Reserve System, at the H Parker Willis Lecture in Economic Policy, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia, 2 March 2004.  
Sept. 25The Weimar Republic and Hitler's rise to power (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 188-190, 213-219  
Sept. 30Totalitarianism compared: the Stalinist Soviet Union (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 227-230, 288-293.  
Oct. 2Totalitarianism compared: the Nazi regime (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 281 - 288.  
Oct. 7The road to war (1): authoritarianism in Southern Europe (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 224, 299-324  
Oct. 9The road to war (2): international crisis and the politics of appeasement (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 329-351.  
Oct. 14The course of the Second World War (1): repression and resistance in the Nazi New Order (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 355-384 AND/OR Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century, Penguin Books, London, 1998, pp. 141-184 (moodle)  
Oct. 16The course of the Second World War (2): why the allies won? (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 390-400 AND Richard Overy, Why the Allies Won, Randomhouse, London, 2006, pp. 386-401 (moodle)  
Oct. 21Midterm exam to be held in class   
Oct. 23Origins of the Cold War: the Iron Curtain and the division of Europe (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 400-422 AND/OR Tony Judt, Postwar: a History of Europe since 1945, Penguin Press, New York, 2005, pp. 129-165 (moodle)  
Oct. 28Western Europe from War to Peace (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 425-433 AND/OR Tony Judt, Postwar: a History of Europe since 1945, Penguin Press, New York, 2005, pp. 360-390 (moodle)  
Oct. 30Stalinism and De-Stalinization in Eastern Europe (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 447-479 AND/OR Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century, Penguin Books, London, 1998, pp. 253-290 (moodle)  
Nov. 4The European post-war economic boom (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 503-515 AND Stephen Broadberry and Kevin O’Rourke (Eds.), The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe, Volume 2: 1870 to the present, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2010, pp. 296-333 (Moodle)Outline of individual paper due 
Nov. 6Europe and decolonization: an international perspective (A)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 479-487 AND/OR Odd Arne Westad, The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Time, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, pp. 73-130 (moodle)  
Nov. 111968: social and cultural change (A)Tony Judt, Postwar: a History of Europe since 1945, Penguin Press, New York, 2005, pp. 390-422 (moodle) AND/OR Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 516-539.   
Nov. 13Ostpolitik and Détente (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 540-548  
Nov. 18European democracies and the crisis of the 1970s (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 548-551, 558-559 AND Tony Judt, Postwar: a History of Europe since 1945, Penguin Press, New York, 2005, pp. 553-484 (moodle)  
Nov. 20Dictatorship and its demise in Southern Europe (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, 559-562 AND/OR Tony Judt, Postwar: a History of Europe since 1945, Penguin Press, New York, 2005, pp. 504-525 (moodle)  
Nov. 25The Brezhnev Era (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 613-639  
Nov. 27The new politics of the 1980s (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 551-558 AND Mark Mazower, Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century, Penguin Books, London, 1998, pp. 332-366 (moodle)  
Dec. 2Collapse: Gorbachev and the demise of the Soviet Union (B)Robert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 643-652 AND/OR Eric Hobsbawm, Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century, 1914-1991, Abacus, London, 1995, pp. 461-500 (moodle)  
Dec. 4Who won the Cold War? Unipolarity and European integrationRobert O. Paxton and Julie Hessler, Europe in the Twentieth Century, Fifth Edition, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, 2012, pp. 652-673Electronic copy of individual papers due at 6 pm on the last day of class