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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 181-2"
COURSE NAME: "Politics and Power in Roman Architecture - Augustus to Mussolini"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Alberto Prieto
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: M 2:15-5:00 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: On-site; activity fee: €25 or $33
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This on-site survey investigates the history of Rome primarily through its monuments—its architecture and urban form. This course will provide the student with a clear grasp of how the city of Rome has changed over the course of two thousand years from a modest Iron Age settlement on the Palatine Hill to a thriving modern metropolis of the twentieth century. The student will become intimately acquainted with the topography, urban makeup and history of the city and its monuments and will acquire the theoretical tools needed to examine, evaluate and critically assess city form, design and architecture.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The course necessarily begins with a brief introduction to two interrelated features of the city which exerted a decisive influence on its early development: its physical setting and its origins somewhere between legend and history (753-509 BC). The city’s Republican phase (509-31 BC), when the senate assumes control of the government, establishes the pattern of aristocratic sponsorship of architecture and urban organization as an expression of social prestige and dominance. As this pattern ultimately endures for two millennia, finding its greatest expression in terms of scale and splendor in the monarchic rule of the emperors (31 BC-AD 313), the course explores in depth the messages, meanings, aspirations, and values that Roman aristocrats and emperors sought to transmit via their creations.

                The conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity (313-600) sees the urban landscape transformed via the construction of churches, the conversion of existing buildings into churches, and the cannibalization of the ancient urban fabric for the realization of these new structures. In the course of the Middle Ages (600-1400), as the papacy struggles to assert itself as both spiritual and temporal leader of Italy and aristocratic families vie to occupy the papal throne, the fracturing of the ancient city is accelerated, and piety and power are equally emphasized with the construction of new churches and monasteries and the division of the urban fabric into a series of fortified positions. The Renaissance and Baroque periods (1400-1800) see the papacy, humiliated by the forced relocation to Avignon and the outbreak of the Protestant Reformation, adopt a militant spirituality advertised in a massive program of urban reorganization involving palaces, streets, squares, churches, villas, and fountains.

                In the Napoleonic era (1800-1870) power replaces piety as the main focus of architecture and urban organization, setting the stage for the extreme makeover of Rome sponsored by the new Italian state headed by the Savoy monarchy (1870-1922) with the aim of presenting the new Capital of Italy as a rival for Paris or London. The Fascist epilogue (1922-1943), while borrowing many of its cues from previous periods, marks a significant deviation from past practice due to its peculiar historical context, developing a style of architecture and urban organization that emphasize the sheer power of the state and its supreme leader over the citizenry and all forms of social organization.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

As a result of this course, the student will be able to:

·         describe and discuss buildings, spaces, and other urban features in terms of their formal design, construction, decoration, purpose/function, meaning, and physical context;

·         identify and describe the methodological tools used to study architecture and urban organization;

·         identify, describe, and discuss continuity and change in architectural style and function/purpose, construction techniques and materials, and urban organization across time periods;

·        discuss how the architecture and urban organization of a given period related to the prevailing social, economic, and political conditions in Rome, and how those conditions changed over time.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Rome: An Urban History from Antiquity to the Present•Rabun Taylor, Katherine W. Rinne and Spiro KostofCambridge University Press9781107601499  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Mussolini's Rome: Rebuilding the Eternal CityB. W. PainterPalgrave Macmillan9781403980021DG813 .P28 2007 
The Renaissance in RomeL. W. PartridgeLaurence King Pub.9781780670294N6920 .P38 2012 

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Attendance and participationAs the material covered in the course is cumulative in nature, students are expected to attend every class session. However, there may be days over the course of the semester in which students are sick or otherwise indisposed. Students are allowed to miss two class sessions without question or penalty. Students who miss a class are required to understand the material covered in their absence. 10
Mid-term examinationThe mid-term examination will consist of 1. a series of terms (concepts/terms, dates, locations, and historical persons) to be identified briefly (2-4 sentences) in relation to their significance for the architecture and urban organization of Rome; 2. a timeline of milestones in the architecture and urban organization of Rome to be arranged in chronological order; 3. a blank map of an area of the city requiring labels, dates, and/or other significant information; and 4. one short (3+ pages) essay addressing a theme in the architecture and urban organization of Rome. 25
Final examinationThe final examination will consist of 1. a series of terms (concepts/terms, dates, locations, and historical persons) to be identified briefly (2-4 sentences) in relation to their significance for the architecture and urban organization of Rome; 2. a timeline of milestones in the architecture and urban organization of Rome to be arranged in chronological order; 3. a blank map of an area of the city requiring labels, dates, and/or other significant information; and 4. one longer (5+ pages) essay addressing a theme in the architecture and urban organization of Rome. 35
Research paperA research paper of approximately 10 pages (3000 words), complete with bibliography/works cited page and formal citations of sources (footnotes or endnotes), will allow the student to demonstrate analytical skill and understanding of the correct use of both primary and secondary sources in the performance of research on a topic pertaining to the architecture and urban organization of Rome as expressions of social, political, and economic conditions in either a synchronic (single-period) or diachronic (multi-period) context. The research paper will be evaluated on the quality and depth of the engagement with the material (use of appropriate and sufficient sources) and the clarity of the writing (frequency of spelling and grammatical errors, organization/structure of ideas and arguments). 20
On-site presentationThe on-site presentation involves relating the most important facts/details about a site or monument in Rome (for example, date of creation, creator, materials, notable associated events and personalities) and its overall significance within the context of the architecture and urban organization of the city. The individual topics will be assigned in the first week of the course. The instructor will provide guidance on research sources and expected contents. 10

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

As the material covered in the course is cumulative in nature, students are expected to attend every class session. However, there may be days over the course of the semester in which students are sick or otherwise indisposed. Students are allowed to miss two class sessions without question or penalty. Students who miss a class are required to understand the material covered in their absence. The University does not require medical certificates for routine illnesses causing minor absences from regular class meetings. Every subsequent absence from class not substantiated by a valid excuse will result in a loss of 2 points from the 10-point participation component of the course, equivalent to 2% of the final course grade. Personal travel is never considered a valid excuse for missing class.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week 1 September 2

Course introduction; topography-geography, geology, and geomorphology of Rome; origins and development through the Republic

Meeting point: classroom; on-site

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 1-3

G. Heiken, R. Funiciello, and D. De Rita, The Seven Hills of Rome. A Geological Tour of the Eternal City. Princeton: Princeton University Press 2007.

Ch. 1, “A Tourist’s Introduction to the Geology of Rome”



Week 2 September 9

Late Republic and Augustus

Meeting point: Largo Argentina (next to the tower)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 4-5

K. Galinsky, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2005.

Ch. 10 D. Favro, “Making Rome a World City”

P. Erdkamp (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2013.

                                Ch. 11 R. Don Miller, “Monumental Rome”

 

Week 3 September 16

Caput mundi

Meeting point: Column of Trajan

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 8-9

A. Claridge, Rome. An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

pp. 37-58, 134-142, 147-173


Week 4 September 23

The Roman Forum

Meeting point: Largo Romolo e Remo

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 6-7

P. Aicher, Rome Alive. A Source-Guide to the Ancient City. Wauconda: Bolchazy-Carducci 2004.

Sections 21-57 (overview of the Roman Forum to Arch of Titus), concentrating on the introductory commentaries


Week 5 September 30

Entertainment and leisure

Meeting point: Colosseo metro stop (in front of ground level, near news kiosk)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 10-11

J. Coulston and H. Dodge, eds., Ancient Rome: The Archaeology of the Eternal City. Oxford: Oxford University School of Archaeology, 2000.

Ch. 9 K. Coleman, “Entertaining Rome”


Week 6 October 7

Infrastructure

Meeting point: Piazza Belli (across Viale Trastevere from Critelli building)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 12-13

A. Claridge, Rome. An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

pp. 58-59

F. Coarelli, Rome and Environs. An Archaeological Guide. Berkeley: University of California

Press 2007.

11-27

C. Williamson, The Laws of the Roman People: Public Law in the Expansion and Decline of the Roman Republic. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.

             Ch. 6 “Convergence: The City of Rome”

 

Week 7 October 14

Late Antiquity

Meeting point: Basilica of S. Maria Maggiore (next to honorary column in front)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 14-18

J. Coulston and H. Dodge, eds., Ancient Rome: The Archaeology of the Eternal City. Oxford: Oxford University School of Archaeology, 2000.

Ch. 12 N. Christie, “Lost Glories? Rome at the End of Empire”

 

Week 8 October 21

Mid-term

Meeting point: classroom



Middle Ages: Tiber Island towers, Theater of Marcellus & house, Pierleoni house, Laurentius house, Aracoeli, Forum Transitorium

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 19-25

 

Week 9 October 28

Renaissance

Meeting point: terminus of #8 tram (Piazza Venezia)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 26-27

L. W Partridge, The Renaissance in Rome (Frohring Library reserve shelf)

             Chs. 2-3

 

Week 10 November 4

Counter-reformation

Meeting point: Column of Trajan

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 28-29

L. W Partridge, The Renaissance in Rome (Frohring Library reserve shelf)

             Ch. 1

 

Week 11 November 11

Baroque

Meeting point: Piazza Navona (near Four Rivers Fountain at center)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Chs. 30-31

K. James-Chakraborty, Architecture Since 1400. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 2014.

          Ch. 9 “Baroque Rome”

Week 12 November 18

Napoleonic period & Risorgimento

Meeting point: terminus of #8 tram (Piazza Venezia)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Ch. 32-33

R. J. B. Bosworth, Whispering City: Rome and Its Histories. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

             Ch. 2, “Rome, Revolution and History”

J. Coulston and H. Dodge, eds., Ancient Rome: The Archaeology of the Eternal City. Oxford: Oxford University School of Archaeology, 2000.

Ch. 13 H. Petter, “Back to the Future: Archaeology and Innovation in the Building of Roma Capitale”

 

Week 13 November 25

Fascism

Meeting point: Ara Pacis Augustae (near main entrance)

Readings: Rome. An Urban History Ch. 34

B. W. Painter, Mussolini’s Rome: Rebuilding the Eternal City (Frohring Library reserve shelf)

pp. 1-19, 39-49, 59-63, 68-75, 125-131

 

Week 14 December 2

Rome in summation; review for final exam

Meeting point: Piazza della Repubblica (in front of Officine Italiane)

Readings: A. Claridge, Rome. An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

                                pp. 391-395

F. Coarelli, Rome and Environs. An Archaeological Guide. Berkeley: University of California

Press 2007.

pp. 15-16

Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri official website

             Sections on the basilica and the meridian line

B. W. Painter, Mussolini’s Rome: Rebuilding the Eternal City (Frohring Library reserve shelf)

pp. 119-125