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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 302"
COURSE NAME: "Romanticism "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Lewis Samuel Klausner
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The turn of the nineteenth century, also known as the Age of Revolution, saw deep cultural, political and economic changes in Western society, which caused equally deep and long-lasting innovations in the understanding of the self as a liberated individual in a necessary relationship with nature and a political whole. These changes are reflected in, or sometimes anticipated by, the literature of the time. Famous for its poetry, the Romantic period also saw the publication of ground-breaking novels, political pamphlets, essays, memoirs and other texts destined to radically alter the idea of literature, committing to individual self-expression and a breaking of any imposed aesthetic or formal rule. The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to one of the most innovative and paradigm-changing periods in literature through the study of the ongoing interplay between cultural contexts and individual work during the Romantic period. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
The turn of the nineteenth century, also known as the Age of Revolution, saw deep cultural, political and economic changes in Western society, which caused equally deep and long-lasting innovations in the understanding of the self as a liberated individual in a necessary relationship with nature and a political whole. These changes are reflected in, or sometimes anticipated by, the literature of the time. Famous for its poetry, the Romantic period also saw the publication of ground-breaking novels, political pamphlets, essays, memoirs and other texts destined to radically alter the idea of literature, committing to individual self-expression and a breaking of any imposed aesthetic or formal rule. The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to one of the most innovative and paradigm-changing periods in literature through the study of the ongoing interplay between cultural contexts and individual work during the Romantic period. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
In this course students will emerge with a sense of Romantic literature in an informed, historical context. They will be able to read the poetry and (mostly non-fiction) prose of this period with a increased sense of the period's conventions, vocabulary, and abiding concerns. We will also work on students becoming more accomplished writers, more able to write critical essays that deal with this period.   
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Romantic PeriodGreenblatt et al Norton978-0393912524  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
First Paper Paper on William Blake.20
Second PaperPaper on First Generation poets (Wordsworth and/or Coleridge) or on contemporary prose20
Third Paper Paper on second generation poet(s), Keats, Shelley and/or Byron, or contemporary prose20
Midterm Exam On material read over the first half of the semester20
Final ExamOn material read during the second half of the semester20

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
The turn of the nineteenth century, also known as the Age of Revolution, saw deep cultural, political and economic changes in Western society, which caused equally deep and long-lasting innovations in the understanding of the self as a liberated individual in a necessary relationship with nature and a political whole. These changes are reflected in, or sometimes anticipated by, the literature of the time. Famous for its poetry, the Romantic period also saw the publication of ground-breaking novels, political pamphlets, essays, memoirs and other texts destined to radically alter the idea of literature, committing to individual self-expression and a breaking of any imposed aesthetic or formal rule. The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to one of the most innovative and paradigm-changing periods in literature through the study of the ongoing interplay between cultural contexts and individual work during the Romantic period. This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 300-level literature classes are required to produce 5-6,000 words of critical writing.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week 1
Blake

Week 2 
Blake 

Week 3 
Blake 

Week  4
Wordsworth and Coleridge 

Week 5
Wordsworth and Coleridge

Week 6 
Wordsworth and Colerige

Week 7 
Sum up first half
Midterm

Week 8 
Shelley and Byron

Week 9 
Shelley and Byron

Week 10 
Shelley and Byron

Week 11
Keats

Week 12
Keats

Week 13
Keats

Week 14 
Summary

Final Exam