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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PS 335"
COURSE NAME: "Theories of Personality "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session II 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Ed De St. Aubin
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 9:00-10:50 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: PS 101
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Personality is generally defined as an individual’s unique stable pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving, and its study has been an extremely important focus in scientific psychology. This course examines the various theories of personality and, according to each theory, a personality’s structure and development. The scope of theories studied will be from the Freudian tradition through to Trait Theories, Biological Perspectives, Behavioral/Social Learning theories, Humanistic/Existential models and finally to more current Cognitive theories. Students will have opportunities to critically evaluate each theory/perspective, and in each of the theories address a variety of questions.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
I am excited to be teaching this course at John Cabot this summer. This topic is what drew me to being a psychology professor and it is a major area of my current research projects. Personality Psychologists focus on the individual and all that influences how they develop and behave.  This area of Psychology asks such great questions:  What motivates people to do what they do?; What influences human behavior, emotion, and cognition?; How do we explain the similarities and differences between people? And the list goes on.  It will be fun to work with students as we engage in readings and discussions about how different psychologists have tried to answer these questions.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

.  While I still need to work out the details of our semester together (text, specific assignments, schedule) I know that we will include:

1) Some self-exploration in terms of gaining a deeper understanding of our own personalities.  We will take a sample of personality tests (nothing too private).

2) Critical comparisons of the different approaches Personality Psychologists have taken to this area of scholarship.

3) Real world applications of why this is an important and useful topic in many life areas.

4) Deep examinations of particular individuals – well known public figures – from the various personality psychology perspectives. 


TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Personality Psycology 6th Edition Randy Larson and David BussMcGraw Hill .  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Tests There are 4 tests administered in this class. Each will be multi-formatted (multiple choice, short answer, possibly T/F and matching) and will cover material (chapters and discussions) covered since the previous test. Each is worth 10% of final grade for a total of 40%.40%
Course Project/Presentation Final assignment is a class presentation regarding your analysis of a specific individual’s personality. Please make sure to get Ed’s agreement by test 2 (7/23) that the person you chose is appropriate for this assignment. Your presentation should have 3 clear sections: 1) Brief introduction of the person and their major biographical points. 2) Your analysis of this personality drawing from at least 4 of the 6 domains we cover in class (see text table of contents or course schedule in this syllabus). 3) Your final statement/insight regarding this personality. • Present course material as if to a general audience. This means providing clear definitions and intellectual context. • If a major personality scholar is mentioned, provide brief biographical background. • If a significant research study in personality is discussed, provide reference and basics regarding methods, hypothesis, and limitations. 30%
Immersion into MaterialIt is important that we engage with this material in various creative ways. This is not difficult since we are surrounded by issues of personality every day. Further, these will help us deepen our Rome experience. You must complete one in each category to receive the full 20 points. You submit these in the order you wish but you must turn in one before each of the 4 test dates. First Rome/Italy Observation (6 points) = Something you saw that is relevant to our course material. Describe the observation and then write a brief (1-2 page) reflection on it - making any relevant connections to class material and including your reactions and insights. Second Rome/Italy Observation (6 points) = Something you saw that is relevant to our course material. Describe the observation and then write a brief (1-2 page) reflection on it - making any relevant connections to class material and including your reactions and insights. Song (4 points) = Email me a recoding (link) to a song that addresses a topic we cover in class. Could even be just a phrase from the song that you connect to the course. Include in the body of your email your thoughts about the song and why you chose to send it. News Item (4 points) = Email me a copy of a news item from 2018/19 and your reflections (1-2 pages) on the topic. Include reference to course material. Venue may be any media source - paper, blog, etc. - that covers current events. 20%
Class Participation It is imperative that students come to class ready to engage in discussion for it is student energy that drives this course. We will begin without students having to write out and submit responses to chapter questions but may initiate this process if we find our discussions lacking sufficient input/preparedness.10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Personality is generally defined as an individual’s unique stable pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving, and its study has been an extremely important focus in scientific psychology. This course examines the various theories of personality and, according to each theory, a personality’s structure and development. The scope of theories studied will be from the Freudian tradition through to Trait Theories, Biological Perspectives, Behavioral/Social Learning theories, Humanistic/Existential models and finally to more current Cognitive theories. Students will have opportunities to critically evaluate each theory/perspective, and in each of the theories address a variety of questions.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Monday, July 8

            Orientation to Class

 

Tuesday, July 9

            Perspectives on Sexuality.  Please read chapter 1 of the text.

            Sex Research:  Methods and Problems.  Please read chapter 2 of the text.

                        Chapter question response for either chapter 1 or 2 (not both; you choose)

 

Wednesday, July 10

            Female and Male Sexual Anatomy/Physiology.  Please read chapters 3 and 4.

                        Chapter question response for either chapter 3 or 4 (not both; you choose)



Thursday, July 11

            Sexual Arousal and Response. Please read chapter 6 of the text.

            Class discussion 1:30-2:15 then a 15-minute break then Test 1 at 2:30



Monday, July 15 

            Gender Issues. Please read chapter 5 of the text.                                  



Tuesday, July 16                                   

            Love and Communication in Intimate Relationships. Please read chapter 7.                



Wednesday, July 17

            Sexual Behaviors. Please read chapter 8 of the text.                                                      



Thursday, July 18

            Sexual Orientations. Please read chapter 9 of the text.                                   



Monday, July 22

                        Class discussion 1:30-2:15 then a 15-minute break then Test 2 at 2:30



Tuesday, July 23

            Contraception. Please read chapter 10 of the text.

            Sexually Transmitted Infections.  Please read chapter 15 of the text

                        Chapter question response for either chapter 10 or 15 (not both; you choose)



Wednesday, July 24

            Conceiving Children:  Process and Choice. Please read chapter 11 of text.



Thursday, July 25                                                                                                                

            Test 3 (1:30-2:15) then a 15-minute break then Debate A at 2:30.





Monday, July 29

            Sexuality During Childhood and Adolescence. Please read chapter 12.             



Tuesday, July 30                                                                                         

            Sexuality and the Adult Years. Please read chapter 13 of the text.



Wednesday, July 31

            Sexual Coercion.  Please read chapter 17 of the text.



Thursday, August 1

            Test 4 (1:30-2:15) then a 15-minute break then Debate B at 2:30.



Monday, August 5

            Sexual Difficulties and Solutions. Please read chapter 14.                               



Tuesday, August 6

            Atypical Sexual Behavior. Please read chapter 16 of the text.                

 

Wednesday, August 7

            Sex for Sale.  Please read chapter 18.                                                  



Thursday, August 8                

            Class discussion 1:30-2:15 then a 15-minute break then Debate C at 2:30



Friday, August 9

            Test 5