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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PL 357"
COURSE NAME: "Italy and the Middle East"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Ibrahim Al-Marashi
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 3:40-5:30 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: Junior Standing
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will cover the beginnings of this interaction from the rise of Islam as a faith to Italy’s involvement in the 2011 Libyan war and introduce the students to varying themes that characterize this interaction. This course will transcend wide expanses of time and geographic boundaries. We will cover the study of Muslim societies in Italy ranging from Medieval Muslim communities in Sicily and then jump to the North African Muslim communities of the 20th century. It will examine Italian excursions in the Middle East from the Crusades to the Italian experience in Libya in 1911. It will deal with the Middle Eastern commodities Italy imported from this region, ranging from sugar in the 13th century to oil in the 20th century. To sum up, this course focuses not only on diplomatic and political history, but on the circulation of ideas, the interaction between societies, and how trade and art forms created links between the Middle East and the Italian peninsula from the early Islamic era to the 21st century.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

While the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and its claim that it will conquer Rome generated headlines in Italy and around the globe, this threat occurred within a greater historical context that has characterized Italy’s relationship with the Middle East. This course will cover the beginnings of this interaction from the rise of Islam as a faith to Italy’s involvement in the 2011 Libyan war and introduce the students to varying themes that characterize this interaction.  This course will transcend wide expanses of time and geographic boundaries.  We will cover the study of Muslim societies in Italy ranging from Medieval Muslim communities in Sicily and then jump to the North African Muslim communities of the 20th century.  It will examine Italian excursions in the Middle East from the Crusades to the Italian experience in Libya in 1911.  It will deal with the Middle Eastern commodities Italy imported from this region, ranging from sugar in the 13th century to oil in the 20th century.  It will have an emphasis on the economic interaction between Italy and the Middle East, including the history of trade, finance, and banking to the geopolitics and diplomacy of Italian corporations such as Fiat and ENI, and how globalization affects this interaction. To sum up, this course focuses not only on the diplomatic and political, but on the circulation of ideas, the interaction between societies, and how trade and art forms created links between the Middle East and the Italian peninsula from the early Islamic era to the 21st century. 

No previous background of the Middle East is necessary.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students will:

1.      Be able to analyze how the political history of the Italian peninsula and the Middle East is currently contested and debated in the present

2.      Understand the differences between formal and popular political memory in Italy and the Middle East 

3.     Appreciate a gendered perspective in the politics of Italian-Middle East interaction

4.     Grasp globalization and its influence on the interaction of the Italian peninsula and the Middle East

5.     Develop a historical understanding of foreign policy history from the era of Italian city-states to the Italian Republic

6.     Develop an understanding of the economic and financial interaction between the Italian peninsula and the Middle East, from the Crusades to Libya war of 2011 and the rise of ISIS

 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class ParticipationClass participation includes attending class (attendance will be taken), participating in classroom discussions, COMING TO THE FILMS, and demonstrating the completion of the readings.20
4 quizzes x 10%Each quiz will cover the readings for the previous week40
Final ExamFinal exam will be short ID and essays. I will give out a study guide40

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Preparation for, attendance at, and participation in lectures and site visits are all required and will count toward the student’s final grade.  Students are allowed only two absences; each additional absence will result in a significant reduction in the final grade for the course.  Students with more than five absences will fail the course.  Students arriving in class after attendance has been taken will be counted as absent.  Students who miss class are responsible for getting class notes from another student.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

SCHEDULE


WEEK I


May 27 WELCOME SESSION

The Critique of Huntington’s Clash of Civilizations

May 28 SICILY

Introduction to Strategic Geography in the Mediterranean

The Politics of Eddie Huang, Mafia, Lemons and Citrus Fruits

May 29 SICILY

Strategy and Foreign Policy of the Early Islamic Empires and the Italian Peninsula

The Role of Sicily in the Mediterranean Strategy of Early Islamic States

May 30 THE CRUSADES

The Foreign Policy of Amalfi, Genoa, and Venice during the Crusades


WEEK II


June 3 THE POLITICS OF THE RENAISSANCE & VENICE

International Trade between the Peninsula and the Middle East

A “Clash of Civilizations” in Renaissance Art?

Quiz 1! On Readings 1.1 Clash, 2.1 Sicily, 3.1 Crusades

 

June 4 OTRANTO

Political Memorialization of Otranto and Lepanto Battles

June 5 OTRANTO (con’t)

June 6 THE BATTLE FOR LEPANTO

The Foreign Policy of Bandwagoning: Venice and the Ottoman Hegemon


WEEK III


June 10 LEPANTO

Quiz 2! On Readings 4.1 Renaissance, 5.1 Otranto

June 11 ORIENTALISM

The Politics of Edward Said and Italy and the Middle East

June 12 THE LIBYA COLONY

The Italian-Ottoman War of 1911

Foreign Policy of Mussolini’s Italy and the Middle East

Italian Counter-Insurgency and the Revolt of Umar Mukhtar

June 13 THE LIBYA COLONY


WEEK IV


June 17 THE LIBYA COLONY

Quiz 3! 6.1 Lepanto, 7.1 Pirates, 8.1 Libya Colony

June 18 ITALY & TERRORISM

Perceived Security Threats within Italy

June 19 ITALY’s MUSLIMS

Conversion among Italians to Islam

June 20 ENI, ITALY, & OIL

The Geopolitics of Energy and Italian Foreign Policy

Introduction to Resource Nationalism

The Foreign Policy of ENI


WEEK V


June 24 ITALY & THE 2003 IRAQ WAR

Quiz 4! 9.1 Italy & Terrorism, 10.1 Italy’s Muslims, 11.1 ENI, 12.1 Italy & Iraq, 13.1 Italy & Libya

June 25 ITALY & THE 2011 LIBYA WAR

June 26 ITALY & THE LEVANT: SYRIA, LEBANON ISRAEL, & PALESTINE

Non-State Actors, Transnational Islamist Networks

June 27 THE MIDDLE EAST IN CONTEMPORARY ITALY

Cultural Politics, the Middle East in Domestic Italian Politics

The Italian Media and the Middle East

Reviewing the Clash of Civilizations Argument

June 28 Final Exam