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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "ENGR 200"
COURSE NAME: "Material and Energy Balances"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Daina Briedis
EMAIL: briedis@egr.msu.edu
HOURS: MTWTH 9:00-10:50 AM & MW 1.30-3:20PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will introduce the student to chemical engineering and the fundamental principles of chemical process analysis. The student will gain experience in the application of problem-solving techniques in a variety of process-related problems. Aspects of professional development as a chemical engineer will be presented and integrated into course material.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

Please note that this syllabus is a draft and may be edited in the future

Chemical engineering calculations. Synthesis of chemical process systems. Analysis of chemical processes using material and energy balances. Energy calculations for changes in temperature, phase transitions, and chemical reactions.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

1.    Convert quantities among the SI, American English, and cgs unit systems with appropriate significant figures
2.    Draw and fully label process flow diagrams
3.    Analyze and solve material and energy balances for steady-state, single and multi-unit processes without reactions
4.    Analyze and solve material and energy balances for steady-state, single and multi-unit processes with reactions
5.    Perform calculations using data and physical properties from tabulated sources (e.g., steam tables, Txy and Pxy diagrams, psychrometric charts) and equations of state
6. Apply basic mathematical and computational tools that support problem solving in this course (Excel, Matlab, or basic Aspen)

 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Homework (written) 15%
WileyPLUS homework 12%
Quizzes (4) 48%
Final Exam 25%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent problem-solving approach displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work only suffers from minor conceptual and calculation errors.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures. There is some evidence that homework problems have not been completed.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material. Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of problem solving and the principles underlying the course material.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Regular attendance is expected and is critical to doing well in the course.

 

Major exams cannot be made up without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Course Location

T.1.2-Tiber Campus, First Floor, Room 2

Week 1   Ch. 1 – What chemical engineers do for a living

Ch. 2 – Introduction to engineering calculations (units and dimensions, weight, dimensional homogeneity)

Ch. 3 – Processes and process variables (mass and volume, flow rate, chemical composition, pressure, temperature)

Ch. 4 – Fundamentals of material balances (process classification, material balance calculations, multiple-unit processes)

 

Week 2    Ch. 4 – Fundamentals of material balances (recycle and bypass, stoichiometry, reactive processes, combustion

Ch. 5 Single-phase systems (densities, ideal gases, equations of gas for non-ideal gases, compressibility factor equation of state)

Ch. 6 Multiphase systems (single component phase equilibrium, Gibbs phase rule)

 

Week 3   Ch. 6 Multiphase systems (gas-liquid systems, multicomponent systems, solutions of solids in liquids)

Ch. 7 Energy and energy balances (first law of thermodynamics, kinetic and potential energy, energy balances on closed systems)

 

Week 4   Ch. 7 Energy and energy balances (energy balances on open systems at steady state, thermodynamic data)

Ch. 8 – Balances on nonreactive processes (energy balance calculations, changes in pressure at constant temperature, changes in temperature, phase-change operations)

 

Week 5   Ch. 9 – Balances on reactive processes (heats of reaction, Hess’s law, formation reactions and heats of formation, heats of combustion, energy balances on reactive processes, fuels and combustion)

 

Final Exam on Friday