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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PL 326 H"
COURSE NAME: "Globalization and Crime - HONORS (This course carries 4 semester hours of credits. A minimum CUM GPA of 3.5 is required)"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Isabella Clough Marinaro
EMAIL: iclough@johncabot.edu
HOURS: MW 3:00-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: at least one 200-level course in Economics, International Affairs or Business
OFFICE HOURS: 30 minutes before each class or by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course introduces students to debates surrounding the effects of globalization on the proliferation of crime across borders and the challenges of developing internationally effective policing and judicial mechanisms for combating this constantly mutating phenomenon. Areas of study include the trafficking of art and archaeology, fake fashion items, waste, narcotics, and arms, as well as the market in human beings for sex and organs, and the economic implications of criminal penetration in legal financial markets and the increasing connections between international crime groups and terrorism, the political and military influence of OCGs in failed states and the connections between criminal groups and various democratic governments.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The course explores the ways in which organized criminal groups (OCGs) and activities are evolving as a result of globalization. It examines how the opening up of markets, transportation routes and communication technologies are facilitating ever more efficient and capillary illegal trades in goods and people. Areas of study include the trafficking of art and archaeology, fake fashion items, waste, narcotics, and arms, as well as the market in human beings for sex and organs. We examine the economic implications of growing criminal penetration in legal financial markets as well as the concerns for state security posed by the increasing connections between international crime groups and terrorism, the political and military influence of OCGs in failed states and the connections between criminal groups and various democratic governments. We will debate the challenges to fighting these phenomena and weigh up the  implications for international stability, democracy, national sovereignty  and the preservation of rights in attempts to develop global security responses.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

·         Outline the problems of defining and measuring transnational organized crime groups and activities

·         Outline the international agreements and strategies currently in place to fight TOC, and provide examples of effective mechanisms at   national and regional levels

·         Discuss the challenges and obstacles to developing more incisive measures to tackle global crime

·         Demonstrate detailed factual knowledge of the various criminal groups, networks and sectors examined in the course

·         Contextualize the criminal activities and markets within a firm knowledge of post-Cold War geopolitical developments

 

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Defining and Defying Organised Crime Allum, F et al Routledge 1138874167   

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Organised Crime and the Challenge to Democracy Allum, F. and SiebertRoutledge 0415467276  
Routledge Handbook of Transnational Organized Crime Allum, F and Gilmour, S eds Routledge 0415579791  
Transnational Organized CRime: Perspectives on Global Security Edwards A, and Gill, P Routledge 0415403391  
Traffick. The Illicit Movement of People and Things Bhattacharyya, G Pluto 0745320473  
Art and Crime Charney, N Greenwood 0313366357  
Fraud, Corruption and Sport Brooks, G et al Palgrave 0230299784  
Transnational Organized Crime: An Overview from Six Continents Albanese, J. and Reichel, PSage 1452290075   
Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global Economy Naim, M Arrow 0099484242  
Global Organized Crime: A Reference Handbook Roth, M ABC-CLIO 159884332X  
llicit Flows and Criminal Things: States, Borders, and the Other Side of Globalization Willem van Schendel (Editor), Itty Abraham (Editor) Indiana University Press 025321811X   
Mafias on the Move: How Organized Crime Conquers New Territories Varese, F Princeton University Press 0691158010  
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Mid-term exam Essay-based exam in which students critically engage with the materials and debates presented in class lectures, discussions and readings20%
Final Exam Essay-based exam in which students critically engage with the materials and debates presented in class lectures, discussions and readings30%
Oral presentation based on research project Students present the methodology and findings of their research paper (see below). 20 minute presentation using powerpoint.10%
Final Research Paper Students will develop a research paper on one of the problems/issues discussed in the course and will debate its dynamics, impacts and possible solutions, drawing from the recommended readings and further bibliographical research. Essays should explore in depth one aspect of the globalization of crime, looking at a single geographical area, a single criminal activity/market or a single criminal grouping/network. Alternatively, they can be a comparative study of two cases. They should prioritize analysis over description. Students will write a minimum of 3,000 words excluding the bibliography and will base their research on AT LEAST 5 scholarly sources. They will submit an outline 1 month before the deadline detailing their research question, data gathering methods, main points of their paper and sources. 25%
Class participation Attendance is mandatory. Participation is graded based on the student's comments, questions, active note-taking and general active engagement in class discussions and activities.15%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for t
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performance demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Letter grades and corresponding percentages for this class

94 – 100 points = A

90 – 93.99 pts = A-

87 – 89.99 = B+

83 – 86.99 = B

80 – 82.99 = B-

77 – 79.99 = C+

70 – 76.99 = C

60 – 69.99 = D

59.99 – 0 = F

ATTENDANCE AND EXAMS POLICY

Attendance is mandatory for this class and you are expected to not miss any classes. If you do, for eaxmple for health reasons, I will accept a maximum of 3 absences after which I will deduct 3% of your final grade for each class missed.

You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until 14 Dec 2018.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Session

Session Focus

Reading and other assignments

WK 1A

21 Jan

Introduction to the course

Naim, Moises (2007) Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global Economy, Arrow, Chapter 2 (p. 12-37)
On MyJCU

WK 1B

23 Jan

 

Defining and Measuring Transnational Organized Crime

United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000) (esp p5-12)
http://www.unodc.org/documents/treaties/UNTOC/Publications/TOC%20Convention/TOCebook-e.pdf

WK 2A

28 Jan

Liquid crime: Globalization and its deviances

Standing, A. (2011) Transnational Organized Crime and the Palermo Convention: A Reality Check  On MyJCU http://www.ipinst.org/2011/01/transnational-organized-crime-and-the-palermo-convention-a-reality-check

WK 2B

30 Jan

Practices of transnational organized crime

Chambliss, W.J. and Williams, E. (2011) in Allum, F. and Gilmour, S. “Transnational Organized Crime and Social Sciences Myths” in  Routledge Handbook of Transnational Organised Crime, Routledge, Chapter 3, p. 52-64
On MyJCU

WK 3A

4 Feb

Money laundering, the ‘clean’ economy and ‘gray’ economies

Sciarrone, R., & Storti, L. (January 01, 2014). The territorial expansion of mafia-type organized crime. The case of the Italian mafia in Germany. Crime Law and Social Change, 61, 1, 37-60. On MyJCU

 

WK 3B

6 Feb

Money laundering cont’d

Europol Serious and Organised Crime Threat Assessment (2013)
https://www.europol.europa.eu/content/eu-serious-and-organised-crime-threat-assessment-socta

WK 4A

11 Feb

Cybercrimes

Watch Sakawa Boys video

WK 4B

13 Feb

Cybercrimes cont’d

Kshetri, Nir B. (2013). Cybercrimes in the Former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe: Current Status and Key Drivers. On MyJCU

WK4C

15 Feb

FRIDAY

MAKE-UP CLASS

Counterfeits and Intellectual Property Crimes

(Make-up for Easter Monday)

Watch counterfeiting documentary (link on MyJCU)

WK 5A

18 Feb

Counterfeits and Intellectual Property Crimes

Cont’d

Adler, Christine, Chappell, Duncan, & Polk, Kenneth. (2009). Perspectives on the organisation and control of the illicit traffic in antiquities in South East Asia. Research Online.

 

WK 5B

20 Feb

Trafficking in art and antiquities

Reading TBA

WK 6A

25 Feb

Trafficking in art and antiquities cont'd

Keefe, P. R. (January 01, 2009). Snakeheads and Smuggling: The Dynamics of Illegal Chinese Immigration. World Policy Journal, 26, 1, 33-44.
On MyJCU

WK 6B

27 Feb

Human smuggling

 Shelley, Louise (2014) Human Trafficking and Smuggling into Europe On My JCU

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/human-smuggling-and-trafficking-europe-comparative-perspective

WK 7A

4 March

Trading in human beings – the trafficking business

Reading TBA

WK7B

6 March

Mid-term Exam

 

WK7C

8 March

FRIDAY

MAKE-UP CLASS

 

Cocaine trafficking: new routes and methods

(Make-up for 1 May)

 

 

Stephen Ellis, “West Africa's International Drug Trade,” African Affairs, 108(431), 2009: 171-196.
On MyJCU

SPRING

BREAK

 

WK 8A

18 March

Heroin and opiates

Eisler, David (2012) “Afghanistan’s Opium Economy: Incentives, Insurgency, and International Demand”, Journal of International Affairs
READ ONLINE
http://jia.sipa.columbia.edu/online-articles/afghanistans-opium-economy/

WK 8B

20 March

Cannabis and synthetic drug trafficking

“Computers pile up in Ghana dump” BBC 5 August 2008
READ ONLINE

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7543489.stm

WK 9A

25 March

The illicit waste trade

Jonny Steinberg “The illicit abalone trade in South Africa” ISS Paper 105 • April 2005, http://www.iss.co.za/pubs/papers/105/Paper105.htm
ON MyJCU

WK 9B

27 March

Environmental crimes

 

WK 10A

1 April

Environmental crimes cont'd

Kinniburgh, C. (2014). Beyond "Conflict Minerals". Dissent (00123846), 61(2), 61-68.

On MyJCU

WK 10B

3 April

Weak and failed states and transnational crime

Asal, V., Milward, H., & Schoon, E. (2015). When terrorists go bad: Analyzing terrorist organizations’ involvement in drug smuggling. International Studies Quarterly, 59(1), 112-123. doi:10.1111/isqu.12162 ON MyJCU

OR

European Parliament (2012) : “Europe’s Crime-Terror Nexus: Links between terrorist and organised crime groups in the European Union P8-40 ON MyJCU

WK 11A

8 April

CLASS CANCELLED

MAKE-UP ON FRIDAY 12 April

WK 11B

10 April

Transnational  crime and terrorism

Council on Foreign Relations (2013) “The Global Regime for Transnational Crime”
READ ONLINE
http://www.cfr.org/transnational-crime/global-regime-transnational-crime/p28656  

WK 11B

12 April

FRIDAY

MAKE-UP

Fighting global crime: State of the art and best practice

 

WK 12A

15 April

Student Presentations

 

WK 12B

17 April

Student Presentations

 

WK 13A

NO CLASS

 

 

WK 13B

24 April

Student Presentations

 

WK 14A

29 May

Student Presentations
Conclusions and review

 

WK 14B

1 May

NO CLASS

 

 

EXAMS

WEEK