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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CL/HS 231"
COURSE NAME: "History of Ancient Rome and Italy"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session II 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Alberto Prieto
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 1:30-3:20 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS: 3:20-4:00

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course surveys nearly 1,100 years of Roman history, from the foundation of Rome by Romulus in 753 BC through the death of Constantine the Great in AD 337. The focus will fall on the persons, events, activities, attitudes, and structures that most directly contributed to Roman civilization’s expansion across Italy and beyond, first under the kings, then under the Senate as a republic, and finally under the emperors. Rome’s numerous successes and failures will be considered, especially in terms of their consequences for ancient and later European history. Brief attention will also be given to the centuries preceding and following the core period covered, in order to understand the origins and context of early Rome, as well as the ultimate fate of the city and Roman civilization.
Although much of the course will necessarily be based on the study of names, dates, circumstances, and motives forming the political and social framework required for the comprehension of history, a significant portion of the course will be devoted to the study of broader issues of culture and identity such as religion, morality, gender, ethnicity, slavery, social and physical mobility, occupations, and the ancient economy, in order to illustrate the variety of investigative approaches that have widened our view of Roman history over the past several decades. To this end the course will introduce the student to the major sources of information and evidence for Roman “daily life” and “social history,” including literary texts, inscriptions, coins, and other material evidence obtained via archaeological techniques, which are enriching our understanding of Roman history with every passing year.
Finally, consideration of the different types and natures of evidence used in the study of Roman history will introduce the student to history as a discipline, which ideally aims for an accurate, precise, and objective reconstruction of the causes, effects, and interrelations of past events by answering the classic questions, “Who?, What?, When?, Where?, How?, and Why?.” The course will encourage the student to think critically about what “Roman history” means (considering, for example, its chronological and geographical extent), what are the relative weights of the available types of evidence, how evidence is selected and assembled into history and historical argument, and how Roman history has been reconstructed at different scales, and for different purposes, from antiquity through the present day.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

This course is designed to give students a critical and historical appreciation of the significant political, cultural, and social accomplishments, events, institutions, figures, trends, questions, and concerns of Roman history from the foundation of Rome through the end of the western Roman empire.

            As a result of this course, the student will be able to:

·    identify and define the major figures, accomplishments, attitudes, events, institutions, trends, questions, and concerns representing the history, culture, and social, economic, political, and religious organization of Rome and the Roman world between 753 BC and AD 600;

·    identify, describe, and analyze the role(s) that each of these accomplishments, events, attitudes, institutions, figures, trends, questions, and concerns had in, and their effect(s) on, the history and development of Rome and the Roman world during this period, both singly/individually and corporately, in both general and specific terms;

·    identify, describe, and critically analyze the various sources available for the reconstruction of Roman history;

·    understand and describe how and why the ancient Romans constructed their history, as well as the differences between ancient and modern historiography;

·    evaluate the merits and faults of various modern/contemporary approaches to historical inquiry.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Romans. From Village to EmpireM. T. Boatwright, D. J. Gargola, N. Lenski, and R. J. A. TalbertOxford University Press978019973057  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Attendance and participationAs the material covered in the course is cumulative in nature, students are expected to attend every class session. However, there may be days over the course of the semester in which students are sick or otherwise indisposed. Students are allowed to miss three class sessions without question or penalty. Students who miss a class are required to understand the material covered in their absence. The University does not require medical certificates for routine illnesses causing minor absences from regular class meetings. Every subsequent absence from class not substantiated by a valid excuse will result in a loss of 3 points from the 15-point participation component of the course, equivalent to 3% of the final course grade. Personal travel is never considered a valid excuse for missing class. 15
Mid-term examinationThe mid-term examination will consist of 1. a series of terms (historical persons, places, concepts) to be identified briefly (2-4 sentences) in relation to their significance for Roman history; 2. a timeline of events to be arranged in chronological order; 3. a blank map of a region requiring labels, dates, and/or other significant information; and 4. one short (3+ pages) essay addressing a theme in Roman history. 25
Research paperA research paper of approximately 10 pages (3000 words), complete with bibliography/works cited page and formal citations of sources (footnotes or endnotes), will allow the student to demonstrate analytical skill and understanding of the correct use of both primary and secondary sources in the performance of research on a topic pertaining to Roman political, military, social, economic, religious, or cultural history. The research paper will be evaluated on the quality and depth of the engagement with the material (use of appropriate and sufficient sources) and the clarity of the writing (frequency of spelling and grammatical errors, organization/structure of ideas and arguments) 25
Final examinationThe final examination will consist of 1. a series of terms (historical persons, places, concepts) to be identified briefly (2-4 sentences) in relation to their significance for Roman history; 2. a timeline of events and/or persons to be arranged in chronological order; 3. a blank map of a region requiring labels, dates, and/or other significant information; and 4. one longer (5+ pages) essay addressing a theme in Roman history 35

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

As the material covered in the course is cumulative in nature, students are expected to attend every class session. However, there may be days over the course of the semester in which students are sick or otherwise indisposed. Students are allowed to miss three class sessions without question or penalty. Students who miss a class are required to understand the material covered in their absence. The University does not require medical certificates for routine illnesses causing minor absences from regular class meetings. Every subsequent absence from class not substantiated by a valid excuse will result in a loss of 3 points from the 15-point participation component of the course, equivalent to 3% of the final course grade. Personal travel is never considered a valid excuse for missing class.

Students with serious illnesses, chronic conditions, or personal emergencies that result in excessive absences should see the instructor and the Associate Dean.

Since class time is limited and there is much material to cover, punctuality is essential. Three arrivals to class more than 15 minutes after the start time without a documented excuse will be counted as an unexcused absence from a class session.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week 1 July 8-11

M Course introduction; history - what is it, and how do you make it?



T Sources and methods for Roman history

Readings: A. Feldherr, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Historians. Cambridge:

                   Cambridge University Press, 2010.

J. Marincola, “Ancient Audiences and Expectations,” 11-23 (PDF)

M. Peachin, ed., The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.

             E. A. Meyer, “Epigraphy and Communication,” 191-226 (PDF)

             C. F. Noreña, “Coins and Communication,” 248-268 (PDF)

W Archaic Italy and the origins of Rome

Readings: The Romans Ch. 1

                  Livy, History of Rome from the Foundation of the City Book I (PDF)



Th Archaeology and/vs. early Roman history

Readings: J. M. Hall, Artifact and Artifice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014.

Ch. 7, “The City of Romulus,” 119-143 (PDF)

 Ch. 8, “Birth of the Roman Republic,” 145-165 (PDF)



Week 2 July 15-18

M Republican Rome and the conquest of Italy

Readings: The Romans Ch. 2

H. I. Flower, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic. 2nd ed. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press, 2014.

                                S. P. Oakley, “The Early Republic,” 3-18 (PDF)



T The beginnings of a Mediterranean empire

Readings: The Romans Ch. 3

                  Polybius, Histories Book I – excerpts (PDF)

                  Livy, History of Rome from the Foundation of the City Book XXIII.1-24 (PDF)



W Italy and empire

Readings: The Romans Ch. 4

                  Plutarch, Life of T. Gracchus (PDF)

                  Sallust, Jugurthine War Chs. 1-16, 63-73, 95-114 (PDF)



Th Italy threatened, enfranchised, divided

Readings: The Romans Ch. 5

                  Appian, Civil Wars Book I Chs. 34-54 (PDF)



Week 3 July 22-25

M The domination of Sulla and its legacy; review for mid-term exam

Readings: The Romans Ch. 6

                  Appian, Civil Wars Book I Chs. 97-106 (PDF)

                  Sallust, Catilinarian Conspiracy



T End of the Republic: Caesar’s dictatorship

Readings: The Romans Ch. 7

                  M. Tullius Cicero, selected letters (PDF)

                   J. Caesar, Civil War – excerpts (PDF)



W Augustus and the transformation of the Roman world

Readings: The Romans Ch. 8

                  Augustus, Res Gestae (Deeds and Accomplishments) (PDF)



Th Mid-term exam



Week 4 July 29-August 1

M Why and how did the Republic end?

Readings: Cassius Dio, Roman History Book 50 (PDF)

                  R. Syme, The Roman Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1939.

                                Ch. I, “Introduction: Augustus and History” (PDF)  

A. F. Giles, “Dux et princeps.” (Review of The Roman Revolution.) The Classical Review 54.1 (March 1940), 38-41 (PDF)



T The early Principate

Readings: The Romans Ch. 9

                  Tacitus, Annals Book I – excerpts (PDF)

                  Suetonius, Gaius (Caligula) (PDF)



W Military expansion and its limits; the empire and the provinces

Readings: The Romans Ch. 10

                  Tacitus, Histories Book I – excerpts (PDF) 

                  Josephus, Jewish War Book VI – excerpts (PDF)



Th Italy and the provinces: civil and military affairs

Readings: The Romans Ch. 11

                  Historia Augusta, Life of Septimius Severus (PDF)

 

Week 5 August 5-8

M The third-century crisis and the tetrarchic restabilization

Readings: The Romans Ch. 12

                  M. Grant, The Collapse and Recovery of the Roman Empire. London: Routledge, 1999.

                                Chs. 1, 4, and 6 (PDF)

T The rise of Christianity and the growth of the barbarian threat (AD 324-395)

Readings: The Romans Ch. 13

                  Lactantius, On the Deaths of the Persecutors Chs. I, VII-XV (PDF)

                  Eusebius, Life of Constantine Book I Chs. XIII-XXXIX; Book II Chs. I-XVIII (PDF) 

                  Memorials of Ambrose and Symmachus (PDF) 

                  Ammianus Marcellinus, The History Book XIV Chs. 1-6 (PDF)



W The final years of the western empire and Rome’s revival in the east (AD 395-476)

Readings: The Romans Ch. 14

                   Augustine, City of God – excerpts (PDF)



Th The end of Roman civilization in Italy (AD 476-584); review for final exam

Readings: S. Mitchell, A History of the Later Roman Empire AD 284-641. Malden, MA: Blackwell 2007

    – excerpts (PDF)

                    E. Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Ch. 39 (PDF)

                    Procopius of Caesarea, Gothic War 5.XIX-XXV (PDF) 


Friday, August 9 Final exam
Research paper due