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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PL/EC 375"
COURSE NAME: "Politics of Gender"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Bridget Welsh
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Junior Standing
OFFICE HOURS: Mondays 1:30-4:30pm and by Appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course explores the ways in which the social and cultural constructions of gender influence the nature and practice of political life. The course revolves around two themes – exclusion and empowerment – and examines the practices, policies and structures that exclude different genders, as well as the strategies and repertoires of different gendered communities to protect their rights and interests and promote equality. The course is organized around a variety of topics, blending issues of exclusion and empowerment. The course begins by laying out debates surrounding gender and key themes used to examine the topic in psychology, biology, sociology and economics. We then move to examine specific synergies between gender and politics, exploring the issues of political representation, political participation, public policy, the body politic, the political economy, development, violence, rights, political mobilization and transnational issues. Using case studies, as well as lessons from practitioners, the course surveys a variety of issues and debates related to gender and politics.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

This course explores the ways in which the social and cultural constructions of gender influence the nature and practice of political and economic life. The course revolves around two themes – exclusion and empowerment – and examines the practices, policies and structures that exclude different genders, as well as the strategies and repertoires of different gendered communities to protect their rights and interests and promote equality. The course is organized around a variety of topics, blending issues of exclusion and empowerment. The course begins by laying out debates surrounding gender and key themes used to examine the topic in psychology, biology, sociology and economics. We then move to examine specific synergies between gender and politics, exploring the issues of political representation, political participation, public policy, the body politic, the violence, rights, political mobilization and transnational issues. We also examine the political economy of gender in-depth, touching on the role of markets, development and the work environment. Using case studies, as well as lessons from practitioners, the course surveys a variety of issues and debates related to gender and politics.   

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

COURSE GOALS  

Students will better understand the factors that contribute to both gender exclusion and empowerment. Students will develop the tools to better understand diversity and contemporary global problems, as well as learn analytical skills and problem-solving.  This course is ideal for students interested in honing their ability to interpret complex issues, understand the diverse perspectives of stakeholders and develop tools to address real world challenges.    

 

Specific Learning Objectives   By the end of this course, students will be able to:  

•       Understand Gender in Power Relations and the Economy

•       Appreciate Gender Diversity  

•       Frame Problems from Multiple Perspectives   

•       Recognize the Range and Breadth of Gender Significance in Politics and the Economy   

•       Evaluate Societal and State Responses Related to Gender  

•       Formulate their Own Views on Gender Politics and the Economy  

•       Research Contemporary Political Issues tied to Gender  

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Power Naomi Alderman(New York: Little Brown and Company, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0316547604  
We Should All be Feminists, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (New York: Anchor, 2015)ISBN-13: 978-1101911761  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class Participation/In-Class ExercisesClass Participation/ In-Class Learning Assignments (15% of total grade) Students are expected to read all the required reading before class to participate in discussion. Please note that more than THREE absences of any class session will significantly lower a student’s final participation grade. Regular patterns of tardiness will also negatively affect a student’s performance. Class participation will be assessed based on the quality of participation in the class, with higher marks given to students who relate inputs to the course readings and express individual ideas articulately and succinctly. Students are not evaluated on the volume that they say, but the degree to which their participation adds value to the discussion. Students are asked to turn their cell/smart phones on silent mode and not use them during class time. Laptops are to be used for note-taking, not chatting and emailing during class time. Student distractions that take away from the overall class learning environment are strongly discouraged and will be assessed in class participation performance. As part of the learning process, students will be asked to participate in a series of in-class simulations, organized debates and problem-solving tasks. These will draw on the assigned course reading. Students will be assessed on their class preparation and the quality of participation in these short assignments. 15%
Initial and Final Gender Self-AssessmentsInitial & Final Gender Self-Assessments (15% of total grade, 5% and 10% respectively) Students are asked to assess their own view of gender identity, gender empowerment and gender exclusion in the beginning of the course and reflect on changes in their perspectives at the end of the semester. These assignments should not extend beyond 2000-2500 words. The guiding questions will be handed out the second day of class. Assessments will be evaluated based on the originality, depth and presentation. The initial self-assessment is due in Week 2 on Thursday, January 31st. It should be delivered by email and hard copy only, not Moodle. The final self-assessment asks students to self-assess what they have learned about gender in the course. Drawing from the initial self-assessment and guiding questions provided in the beginning of term, students are asked to evaluate what are the main issues that they have learned regarding gender identity, gender empowerment and gender exclusion in the beginning of the course and why. The final self-assessment will be conducted during the exam period in early May.15%
Book AssessmentBook Assessment (10% of total grade): Students are asked to review and analyze the assigned book for the course in 3-5 double-spaced pages (1,500-2,000 words). These book assessments must address the gender related issues in the text and connect these issues to the course material. The review must develop an argument. Reviews will be assessed based on their individuality, clarity, presentation, argument and knowledge of the issues in the book. The book will be discussed at the class dinner on Tuesday, January 29th. This assignment is due by Tuesday, February 5th by 5pm and should follow the assignment protocol noted above10%
Gender Policy BriefGender Country Policy Brief (20% of total grade each): Students are asked to write a brief on the specific issues of gender exclusion and empowerment in a specific country in a succinct report (5-6 pages, 2,500-3,000 words). The country chosen should be made in consultation with the professor. The brief must address policy concerns and can be directed to either a political leader or organization in civil society. Briefs will be graded on the substance of the analysis, the research thoroughness, understanding of the problems selected, viability of the evidence presented and the written presentation of the material. Students taking the course as an economics course must focus their brief on economic issues. Late papers will not be accepted. This brief is due March 6th by 5pm and should follow the protocol for turning in assignments noted above. 20%
Gender Empowerment Policy Brief Gender Empowerment Policy Brief (30% of total grade, 25% for the paper and 5% for oral presentation/feedback): Students are asked to brief on a specific issue of gender empowerment in a specific country/locality in a succinct report (6-8 pages, 3,000-3,500 words). The topic chosen should be made in consultation with the professor. Students are to present their paper during the last part of term for five minutes and answer questions from other students for ten minutes. Students must turn in a draft of the paper on April 4th and make another draft available for the class presentations on April 23rd. Please note that class may extend into the lunch hour for at least one of these sessions and one group presentation session may be scheduled outside of the class. A share of the grade will come from the written and oral feedback given to others during the class presentation and your own presentation. Papers will be graded on the substance of the analysis, the research thoroughness, understanding of the problem selected, viability of the evidence presented and the written presentation of the material. Late papers will not be accepted. The final version of this brief is due April 30th by 5pm and should follow the protocol for turning in assignments noted above. 30%
Oral Reading PresentationOral Reading Presentation (10% of the total grade). During the course of the semester, a student is asked to present one of the readings to the class. Students can sign up for specific weeks/readings on CHOICE as part of the MOODLE program. The readings open to presentation are marked with an asterisk (*). These in-class presentations will be no more than five minutes (strict timekeeping). Students should try to present their reading early in the semester. Students will be assessed on their ability to present material clearly and succinctly as well as their understanding of the reading and issue selected. Any power point or material associated with the presentation must be sent to the professor by midnight the night before the presentation. All of the presentations should include a one-page written synopsis of the main questions and findings of the reading as well as the student’s own commentary. The written synopsis is due by 5pm of the class session day and should be left in hard copy and emailed to the professor only. Class presentations should be completed before the middle of April. 10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until May 11th.

Please note that more than THREE absences of any class session will significantly lower a student’s final participation grade. Regular patterns of tardiness will also negatively affect a student’s performance
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

WEEKLY LESSON PLANS AND READINGS

Week 1 (January 20-26) Introducing Gender  

Session 1 (January 21): Course Introduction

Anne Minas. Gender Basics: Feminist Perspectives on Women and Men. (Stanford, CT: Wadsworth, 2000), Part 1.1     

Sigmund Freud. “Some Psychological Consequences of Anatomical Distinction between the Sexes,” in The Freud Reader (New York: Norton, 1925/1989)

Session 2 (January 23): Idea of Feminism  

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie We Should All be Feminists, (New York: Anchor, 2015) Entire

Jessa Crispin. Why I am not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto, (Brooklyn: Melville House Publishing, 2017) pp. 3-22.  

*Rebecca Traister, The Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger. (New York: Simon and Shuster, 2018), Part 1.

Stephanie Zacharek, Eliana Dockterman and Haley Sweetland Edwards, “Time Person of the Year 2017: The Silence Breakers” Time, December 6, 2017. http://time.com/time-person-of-the-year-2017-silence-breakers/

Jason H, “In Italy, #MeToo is more like Meh?” New York Times, December 12, 2016.  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/16/world/europe/italy-sexual-harassment.html

Read three of the essays at: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/one-year-of-metoo           

Week 2 (January 27-February 2) Framing Gender in Social Contexts   

Session 3: (January 28) Society, Family and Gender

*Shira Tarrant (ed.). Men Speak Out: Views on Gender, Sex and Power. (New York: Routledge, 2008), pp. 131-36.     

*Arlie Hochschild and Anne Machung. The Second Shift. (New York: Penguin, 2003), pp. 1-10, 216-238.

*Goran Therborn. Between Sex and Power: Family in the World 1900-2000 (New York: Routledge, 2004), Chapter 3, pp. 107-130.

*Rebecca Traister. All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of the Independent Nation. (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2016), pp. 13-36.

Session 4: (January 30) Sexuality

*Abby L. Ferber, Kimberly Holcomb, and Tre Wentling, Sex, Gender and Sexuality: The New Basics. 3rd Edition. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)

Read two of the following readings from the book:
Leila J. Rupp, "Toward a Global History of Same-Sex Sexuality"
Chrys Ingraham, "Heterosexuality: It's Just Not Natural!"

Kristen Schilt and Laurel Westbrook, "Doing Gender, Doing Heteronormativity: Gender Normals, Transgender People, and the Social Maintenance of Heterosexuality"

Elias Vitulli, "A Defining Moment in Civil Rights History? The Employment Non Discrimination Act, Trans-Inclusion, and Homonormativity”

*** Course Dinner, Discussion of The Power, Tuesday, January 29th, 7:30pm ***

***Gender Initial Self-Assessment Due Thursday, January 31st  by 5pm ***

Week 3 (February 3-9) Gender and the Economy

Session 5 (February 4): Feminist Economics
"Feminist Principles of Economics,” Schneider and Schackelford. (Link)
http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/gschnedr/FemPrcpls.htm
*World Economic Forum. The Global Gender Gap Report 2018. (World Economic Forum, 2018)
, pp. 7-29. http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2018.pdf  
*Institute for Women’s Policy Research, The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation. Washington DC: Institute for Women’s Policy Research April 2016)
*Wall Street Journal. “What’s Your Pay Gap,” May 17, 2016,
http://graphics.wsj.com/gender-pay-gap/

Session 6 (February 6) Gender and Work
Sheryl Sandberg. Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. (New York: Knopf, 2013) pp. 3-17,159-72.
*LeanIn Inc. and McKinsey and Co. Women in the Workplace September 2017. https://womenintheworkplace.com/
*Alana Semeuls, “When Factory Jobs Vanish, Men Become Less Desirable Partners,” The Atlantic, March 3 2017,
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/03/manufacturing-marriage-family/518280/
“Houses divided: Sharing chores at home” The Economist, October 5, 2017  https://www.economist.com/news/international/21729994-houses-divided
“Why India needs women to work,” The Economist, July 5, 2018.
https://www.economist.com/leaders/2018/07/05/why-india-needs-women-to-work

*** Book Assessment Due Tuesday, February 5th by 5pm *** 

Week 4 (February 10-16) Gender and Political Participation

Session 7 (February 11) Gender Participation and Stereotypes
*Kim Fridkin Kahn. The Political Consequences of Being a Woman: How Stereotypes Influence the Conduct and Consequences of Political Campaigns. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), Chapter 9, pp. 117-130.
*Jennifer Lawless and Richard Fox. It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don't Run for Office, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 1-12, 46-49
Kira Sanbonmatsu. “Gender Stereotypes and Vote Choice,” American Journal of Political Science, 46/1: (January 2002), pp. 20-34.
*Jennifer Lawless and Richard Fox, Women, Men and US Politics: Ten Big Questions. (New York: W.W. Norton, 2017), Chapters 1 & 4, pp. 3-21, 55-69.
John Sides, Michael Tesler and Lynn Vayrec, Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and the Battle for the Meaning of America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. pp. 97-129.    

Session 8 (February 13): Gender Political Participation and Ordinary Voters
*Nancy Burns, Kay Lehman Schlozman and Sidney Verba. The Private Roots of Public Action: Gender, Equality, and Political Participation. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001), Chapter 4
*Ronald Inglehart and Pippa Norris “The Developmental Theory of the Gender Gap: Women's and Men's Voting Behavior in Global Perspective.” International Political Science Review, 21/4, 2000, pp. 441-463.
*Marian Muller. “The Private Roots of Public Participation: Women’s Engagement in Democratic Politics in Pakistan,” in Aazar Ayaz and Andrea Fleschenberg (eds.), The Gender Face of Asian Politics. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 165-186.
*Jennifer Lawless and Richard Fox, Women, Men and US Politics: Ten Big Questions. (New York: W.W. Norton, 2017), Chapter 6, pp. 87-101

Session 9 (February 15): Conducting Research on Gender Session with Library Staff
Location:
 Library Learning Hall

Session 10 Visit to the Women’s Shelter Timing TBC.

Week 5 (February 17-23) Gender, Leadership and the State

Session 11 (February 18): Gender Participation and Leadership
Julie Dolan, Melissa Deckman and Michele L. Swers. Women and Politics: Paths to Power and Political Influence, (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 2007), Chapter 3, pp. 72-97. 
*Anne Marie Goetz, “The Problem with Patronage: Constraints on Women’s Political Effectiveness in Uganda,” in Anne Marie Goetz and Shireen Hassim, No Shortcuts to Power: African Women in Politics and Policy-Making (New York: Zed Books, 2003), pp. 110-139.
*Mona Lena Krook. Quotas for Women in Politics: Gender and Candidate Selection Reform Worldwide, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), Chapter 1, pp. 3-17.
*David Niven. “Party Elites and Women Candidates: The Shape of Bias,” Women and Politics, 19/2 (1998): 57-80. http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0195-7732&volume=19&issue=2&sp age=57
*Jennifer Lawless and Richard Fox, Women, Men and US Politics: Ten Big Questions. (New York: W.W. Norton, 2017), Chapter 5, pp. 71-85

Session 12 (February 20): Gender and the State
Johanna Kantola. “Gender and the State: Theories and Debates,” in Johanna Kantola (ed) Feminists Theorize the State, (New York: Palgrave, 2006)
*Carole Pateman. “The Patriarchal Welfare State,” in Christopher Pierson and Frances Castles (eds.). The Welfare State Reader 2nd Edition. (New York: Polity Press, 2007)
Shira Tarrant (ed.). Men Speak Out: Views on Gender, Sex and Power. (New York: Routledge, 2008), pp. 212-219.
*UNWomen. Progress of the World’s Women 2017-2018. (New York: UNWomen, 2016) Chapter 1. pp. 26-61. http://www.unwomen.org/-/media/annual%20report/attachments/sections/library/un-women-annual-report-2017-2018-en.pdf?la=en&vs=2849

Week 6 (February 24-March 2) Gender and the Body Politic

Session 13 (February 25):  Gender and Reproductive Health

 *Mala Htun. “Sex and the State in Latin America,” in Sex and the States: Abortion, Divorce and the Family under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 29-57.
*Betsy Hartmann, Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control. (New York: Haymarket Books, 2016), pp. 149-78.*Silvia De Zordo, Joanna Mishtal and Lorena Anton, A Fragmented Landscape: Abortion Governacne and Protest Logistics in Europe. (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2016), Chapter 4 on Italy.

Session 14 (February 27): Gender and Protection
*Jessica Valenti. The Purity Myth: How America’s Obsession with Virginity is Hurting Young Women. (Berkeley: Seal Press, 2009), Chapter 6. 
*Joan Wallach Scott. The Politics of the Veil. (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010), Chapter 1.
*Madawi Al-Rasheed. A Most Masculine State: Gender Politics and Religion in Saudi Arabia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Chapter 1.
*Human Rights Watch. Boxed: Women and Saudi Arabia’s Guardianship System. July 2016. https://www.hrw.org/report/2016/07/16/boxed/women-and-saudi-arabias-male-guardianship-system         

Week 7 (March 3-10) Gender and Development   

Session 15 (March 4): Framing Gender and Development
Janet Momsem. Gender and Development, 2nd Edition. (New York: Routledge, 2010), Chapter 1, pp. 1-24
*Maria Correia and Ian Bannon. The Other Half of Gender: Men's Issues in Development (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2006), Chapter 1
*Margaret E. Greene, Omar Robles and Piotr Pawlak, “Masculinities, Social Change and Development, Background Paper.” World Development Report 2012. http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDR2012/Resources/7778105-1299699968583/7786210-1322671773271/Greene-et-al-masculinities.pdf   

Session 16: (March 6) Gender and Development Issues
*
Lisa Palmer. Hot, Hungry Planet: The Fight to Stop a Global Food Crisis in the Face of Climate Change. (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017), 
*Mercy Tembon and Lucia Fort. Girl’s Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment and Growth. (Washington, DC: World Bank, 2008), Chapter 2, pp. 23-39.  http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-109 9080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf
*Asian Development Bank, Gender Equality and Food Security: Women’s Empowerment as a Tool Against Hunger, (Manila, ABD, 2013)http://www.adb.org/publications/gender-equality-and-food-security-womens-empowerment-tool-a gainst-hunger  
*World Bank. Promoting Land Rights to Empower Rural Women and End Poverty. (Washington DC: World Bank, 2016). http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2016/10/14/promoting-land-rights-to-empower-rural-women-and-end-poverty  

March 8 Make-Up Session for May 1st.
No class. Session made-up earlier with field trip to Women’s Shelter. 

***Gender Country Paper Brief Due Wednesday, March 6th by 5pm***

Week 8 (March 10-16) Spring Break. No Class.

Week 9 (March 17-23) Gender Violence  

Session 18 (March 18): Repertoires of Gender Violence
S. Swiss and J.E. Giller. 1993. “Rape as a Crime of War,” Journal of American Medical Association. 270/5 (August), pp. 612-615. http://www.womens-rights.org/Publications/JAMA%2093.pdf
Laura Toole, Jessica Schiffman and Margie Kiter Edwards (eds.) Gender Violence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, (New York New York University Press, 2007), pp. 33-54, 257-268. 
*Veena Talwar Oldenburg. Dowry Murder: Reinvestigating a Cultural Whodunnit. (New York: Penguin Books, 2010), Chapter 6.
*UNWomen, Why do some Men Use Violence Against Women and How Can We Prevent It? Quantitative Findings from the United Nations Multo-Country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific. (New York: UNWomen, 2013) http://unwomen-asiapacific.org/docs/WhyDoSomeMenUseViolenceAgainstWomen_P4P_Report. pdf , pp. 9-16, 28-39, 71-79, 88-95.

Session 19 (March 20): Repertoires of Gender Violence II
*Human Rights Watch. Hatred in the Hallways: Violence and Discrimination Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students in U.S. Schools. May, 2001. https://www.hrw.org/report/2001/05/01/hatred-hallways/violence-and-discrimination-against-lesbian-gay-bisexual-and

*Human Rights Watch. Tell me Where I Can Be Safe. Impact of Nigeria’s Same-Sex Prohibition Act. 2016. https://www.hrw.org/report/2016/10/20/tell-me-where-i-can-be-safe/impact-nigerias-same-sex-marriage-prohibition-act

Week 10. (March 24-30) Gender and the Political Economy

Session 20 (March 25): Gender and Sex Work
V. Spike Peterson and Ann Sisson Runyan. Global Gender Issues in the New Millennium, 3rd Edition. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2010), Chapter 5, pp. 183-230. 

*Kimberly Kay Hoang. Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2015), pp. 39-78.
*Sheila Jeffreys. The Industrial Vagina: The Political Economy of the Global Sex Trade. (New York: Routledge, 2008), Chapter 7.

Session 21 (March 27) Gender and Domestic Labor
*Linda Y.C. Lim. “Capitalism, Imperialism, and Patriarchy: The Dilemma of Third World Women Workers in Multinational Factories,” in Nalini Visvanathan (et. Al eds.), The Women, Gender & Development Reader, (London: Zed Books, 1997), pp. 216-229.
*Barbara Ehrenreich, “Maid to Order,” in Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Hoschschild (eds.) Global Woman, Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy, (New York: Owl Books, Henry Holt and Co., 2004), pp. 85-103.
*International Labor Organization. Social Protection for Domestic Workers: Key Policy Trends and Statistics. 2016.  http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---soc_sec/documents/publication/wcms_458933.pdf

Week 11 (March 31-April 6) Women’s Rights and Movements 

Session 22 (April 1): Women’s Rights

Julie Peters and Andrea Wolper (eds.) Women’s Rights Human Rights: International Feminist Perspectives, (New York: Routledge, 1995) pp. 36-48.
V. Spike Peterson and Laura Parisi. “Are Women Human? It’s Not an Academic Question,” in Tony Evans (ed.). Human Rights Fifty Years On: A Reappraisal. (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998)
*Zehra F. Arat. “Women’s Rights in Islam: Revisiting Quranic Rights,” in Adamantia Pollis and Peter Schwab (eds.) Human Rights: New Perspectives, New Realities, (Boulder, Co.: Lynn Rienner, 2000)

Session 23 (April 3): Struggle for Women’s Rights
*Karen Beckwith. “Beyond Compare? Women’s Movements in Comparative Perspective,” European Journal of Political Research,” 37, (2000) pp. 431-468.
*Mina Roces and Louise Edwards (eds.) Women’s Movements in Asia: Feminisms and Transnational Activism. (London: Routledge, 2010), Chapter 1, pp. 1-20.
Jude Howell and Diane Mulligan (eds.) Gender and Civil Society: Transcending Boundaries. (New York: Routledge, 2005), Chapter 3

***Draft Gender Empowerment Brief Due, Thursday, April 4th ***

Week 12: (April 7-13) LGBT Rights            

Session 24 (April 8): Gay Rights
*IGLHRC. 2001. “Sexual Minorities and the Work of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture.” Paper presented by the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. June 5th.  http://www.iglhrc.org/binary-data/ATTACHMENT/file/000/000/185-1.pdf  
*United Nations Human Rights. High Commissioner's report to the Human Rights Council on discrimination and violence against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity (May 2015) http://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/HRC/29/23&referer=/english/&Lang=E

Session 25 (April 10): LGBT Social Movements  
Ann M. Simmons, “Where the world stands on gay rights,” Los Angeles Times, June 21, 2016. http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-global-gay-rights-snap-story.html
Gary Mucciaroni, Same Sex, Different Politics: Success and Failure in the Struggles over Gay Rights (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008), Chapter 3
Barry D. Adam, Jan Willem Duyvendak, and Andre Krouwel. The global emergence of gay and lesbian politics: National imprints of a worldwide movement. (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009) Chapter 1.

Week 13: (April 14-20) Mens Rights and Global Movements

Session 20 (April 15): Rights of Men and Mobilization
*Ciara Doyle, (2004). "The Fathers' Rights Movement: Extending Patriarchal Control Beyond the Marital Family". In Peter Herrman,Citizenship Revisited: Threats or Opportunities of Shifting Boundaries. New York: Nova Publishers.
*Michael Messner. The Politics of Masculinities: Men in Movements, (New York: Sage, 1997), Chapters 1 & 3

Session 26 (April 17) Fighting Gender Violence Globally
Rashmki Goel and Leigh Goodmark (eds.) Comparative Perspectives on Gender Violence: Lessons from Efforts Worldwide. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015). Chapters 1 & 6
End FGM Campaign. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/oct/11/fgm-nigeria-20-million-women-and-girls-undergone-female-genital-mutilation

Week 14: (April 21-27) Class Presentations of Final Paper

April 22nd No Class. Holiday. Make-up day held earlier in semester.

Session 27 (April 24) Class Presentations of Final Paper
           
Please note that class presentations may extend into the lunch hour and involve an outside session depending on the groups and topics.

***Final Gender Empowerment Second Drafts Due, Tuesday, April 23rd ***

Week 15 (April 28) Reflections and Course Review

Session 28 (April 29) Course Review

May 1st Holiday No Class. Make up session earlier.

***Final Gender Empowerment Brief Due, Tuesday, April 30th ***

Week 16 (May 5-11) Final Examination

***Final Gender Self-Assessment Due in class during final examination period***