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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "MUS 101"
COURSE NAME: "Introduction to Music"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Arnold Friedman
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 1:30-3:20 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS: By appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The aim of this course is to explore the language and structure of classical Western music, through the study of fundamental elements of music theory and its application to musical forms and genres. The course will include elements of music theory, basic approach to melody and harmony, and the study of musical instruments. Designed for students with little or no musical background, the course will provide the foundations for reading music and will study the principal composers who determined the course of history of Western Music. Last, the course will also include concert and opera evenings, on-site visits to the Museum of Musical Instruments, and jazz seminars.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course is designed for student with little or no musical background, but will investigate perspectives on music that will also benefit experienced musicians. The subjects covered will include:
    How sound is organized into music
    How music is created and notated
    The historical development of music in Europe from the Middle Ages up to today
    How music is performed
    How music is disseminated
    Similarities and differences between classical Western music and other traditions, including Jazz and contemporary popular music
    Music's roles in society, and society's effect on music
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completing MUS 101, participants will be able to:
    Hear and describe details of musical sound: pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony, timbre, and instrumentation.
    Understand and describe musical forms and genres.
    Understand the basics of standard music notation.
    Listen to music critically and discerningly, and be able to discuss and write about their observations.
    Observe and critique the social, political, economic, and spiritual contexts of music.
    Using easily producible sounds, create musical pieces.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Music, a Social ExperienceCornelius, Steven and Natvig, MaryRoutledgeISBN 9780415789325 ISBN 9781315222868 (ebook) | ISBN 9780415789325 (hardback) | ISBN 9780415789332 (pbk.)
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Weekly QuizzesListening identification, definitions of terms, and matching of musical information, historical figures and musical movements with their cogent facts.20
In-Class PresentationA presentation on a musical personage, movement, or culture. Presentations will take place during the final week of the semester.40
Midterm PaperAn analysis of a musical composition: its aural components, performance medium and genre, historical context, social purpose, and reception.20
ParticipationClass discussions, musical exercises, etc.20

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY
You cannot make-up a major exam or project (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until 26 July 2019.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Dates

Subjects

Readings from Music: A Social Experience

Week 1, May 27-30

What is music? Fundamentals of making and listening to music. Quiz May 30. Piece of the week: Caprice No. 24, Nicoló Paganini

Chapters 1-3, 14

Week 2, May June 3-6

Music and spirituality. Music and gender. Opera. Quiz June 6. Piece of the week: St. Matthew Passion (excerpts), J.S. Bach

Chapters 7, 6

Week 3, June 10-13

Music and the life cycle. Music and ethnicity/nationality. Music and nation. The symphony orchestra. Quiz June 13. Piece of the week: Finale from Symphony No. 9, Ludwig van Beethoven

Chapters 4, 5, 8

Week 4, June 17-20

Music and love. Music and war. Music and dance. Quiz June 20. Piece of the week: Movements 1, 4, 5 from Symphonie fantastique, Hector Berlioz

Chapters 9, 10, 13

Week 5, June 24-28 (Monday - Friday)

Music and technology. Student presentations.

 Chapter 15