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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EC 341"
COURSE NAME: "Economics of Development "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Yasmina Rim Limam
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS:
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: Junior Standing, EC 201, EC 202
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The course focuses on the economics of development, with specific reference to developing countries. While drawing extensively on the tools of standard economic theory, it deals with development issues for which economic theories at best provide only partial answers. It offers a problem-oriented approach, with a historical and institutional perspective, to issues such as poverty, population, income distribution, international trade, investment, aid, and the debt problem.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

Besides a general introduction to economic development and a review of main economic tools and measures, the following topics will be discussed:

-          Characteristics of developing countries

-          Classic theories of growth and development

-          The Solow growth model

-          Human capital, education and health and economic development

-          Poverty, inequality and development

-          International trade and industrialization strategy:  This section looks at developing countries industrialization process from a historical perspective.

-          Balance of payment, financial crises and stabilization policies:  This section looks at a country’s balance of payment accounts, the international flow of financial resources and the impact of financial crises on developing countries. 

-          Foreign finance and foreign direct investment:  This section looks at recent trends in FDI in developing countries and will analyze the role of FDI in economic growth and transfer of technology in developing countries.


LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.      Understand basic concepts of development and the characteristics of developing countries.

2.      Apply basic economic theory to economic development.

3.      Communicate knowledge on current issues and challenges facing developing countries.

4.      Comprehend the complex and multisided character of development.

5.      Understand interconnections between economic variables and the effect of economic policies on economic outcome.


TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Economic Development Michael Todaro and Stephen SmithPearson978-1292002972  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
 Assignment Description %  
Class presentationEach student is required to do one presentation in which he/she will present the outline, literature review and methodology of his/her term paper (please see the end of this rubric). Presentations will often open the door for further class discussion and in class interaction. Students should be able to use theoretical and empirical instruments to justify/illustrate arguments or suggestions. More information on presentations dates will be provided as we move on with the semester. 10
Midterm The midterm covers all material up to the week prior to the midterm date. 35
Written assignmentThere is one short term paper. The assignment consists of analyzing an economic challenge faced by a developing country chosen spontaneously by each student. Student should be able to relate the issue of his/her choice to economic theory. The assignment is not to exceed 800 words. The first item in this table refers to presentations of the country, data and outline of the paper.15
Final examThe final exam is cumulative and covers all the material40

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
The course focuses on the economics of development, with specific reference to developing countries. While drawing extensively on the tools of standard economic theory, it deals with development issues for which economic theories at best provide only partial answers. It offers a problem-oriented approach, with a historical and institutional perspective, to issues such as poverty, population, income distribution, international trade, investment, aid, and the debt problem.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Date

                      Topic

 

January 22nd

Course expectations and syllabus

 

January 24th

Introduction to economic development

 

January 29th

Purchasing power parity

 

January 31st

Measuring development (HDI)

 

February 5th

Characteristics of developing countries

 

February 7th

Characteristics of developing countries 

 

February 12th

Classic theories of development (Harrod, Domar, Lewis)

 

February 14th

Classic theories of development

 

February 19th

The Solow growth model

 

February 21st

The Solow growth model

 

February 22nd  (Make-up day)

Human capital, education and health

 

February 26th 

Human capital, education and health



February 28th

Readings

 

March 5th

Review

 

March 7th

Midterm exam

 

March 11-15

SPRING BREAK



March 19th

Presentations

 

March 21st

Presentations

 

March 26th

Presentations

 

March 28th

Poverty, development and growth, the two way causality



April 2nd

Poverty, development and growth, the two way causality

 

April 4th

Income inequality

 

April 9th

Income inequality

 

April 11th

International trade and industrialization strategy

 

April 16th

International trade and industrialization strategy

 

April 18th

Balance of payment, financial crises and stabilization policies

 

April 23rd

Balance of payment, financial crises and stabilization policies

 

April 25th

PUBLIC HOLIDAY (make-up Feb. 22nd)



April 30th

Foreign finance and foreign direct investment

 

May 2nd

General review