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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "LAT 282"
COURSE NAME: "Directed Readings in Latin"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Massimo Betello
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 3:00-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: LAT 102 or permission of the instructor
OFFICE HOURS: Wednesday after class or by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to offer the opportunity to read texts in the original to students with a basic level of Latin language preparation. The level of readings may range from intermediate to advanced. Language levels will be determined at the beginning of the course, and students will be arranged in suitable reading groups. Texts appropriate to each group’s level will be chosen by the professor and the individual students. Texts will vary, but advanced students may choose from among annotated editions of Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Livy. All groups will work independently and in weekly reading groups with the professor, when issues of language, grammar, and literary technique will be discussed.

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course is an intensive exercise in the study of portions of texts of different Latin authors in their modified and original versions. This is done with the intent to build up fluency in the translation of Latin texts of intermediate difficulty, and to strengthen the ability to recognize and deal with complex grammatical structures.

Consequently, to access to this class students need to have:

A) Good knowledge of all 5 declensions of nouns; B) Good knowledge of both family groups of adjectives (those of 1st and 2nd declensions and those of 3rd declension); C) Good knowledge of all 4 verb declensions and at least 3 irregular verbs (esse; posse; ire) in all 6 tenses in the indicative, imperative and subjunctive moods, active and passive voices; D) Vocabulary of roughly 1000 words; E) all pronouns.
Latin grammar will be reviewed independently at the beginning of the class, and then contextually to the study of the Latin texts.
For every Latin work (or portion of work) studied, the author’s life and style will be analyzed as well. This will allow to set the composition in the proper milieu.

LAT 282 will allow students to move to a 300+ level course at John Cabot University or any another institution.

The virtual learning environment Moodle will be used to post announcements, grades, slides, attendance etc. Please, 1) register at moodle.johncabot.edu using the email address that you use most often, 2) upload a clear face-portrait of you in your Moodle profile, and 3) self-enroll in this course (the password is will be provided during the first class). Failure to fulfill these three requirements by the beginning of the 4th class will result in a zero-grade assignment from the 4th class included until all three requirements will be met.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

At the end of the course, students:

1)    Will have the ability to translate with confidence and property of language Latin texts of intermediate difficulty;

2)    will be able to justify and discuss the choices in their translations;

3)    will have expanded their Latin vocabulary;

4)    will have strengthened their knowledge of Latin grammar;

5)    will be able to describe the outlines of the works translated and discuss their authors

6)    will have improved their English grammar and vocabulary.

A successful conclusion of this course will prepare the students to the study of advanced Latin authors both in prose and poetry.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
A Little Book of Latin Love Poetry: A Transitional Reader for Catullus, Horace, And Ovid. Bilingual edition. BREUKER, John and Mardah B. C. WEINFIELDWauconda, Ill: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2006978-0-86516-601-1 AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK
Reading Livy’s Rome: Selections From Books I-VI Of Livy’s Ab Urbe ConditaMINKOVA, Milena and Terence TUNBERGBolchazy Carducci Pub, 2004978-0-86516-550-2 AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK
Ten Fairy Tales in LatinTWOMEY, Paula CamardellaBolchazy Carducci Pub, 2013978-0-86516-791-9 AVAILABLE AS AN EBOOK
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Cassell’s Latin Dictionary : Latin-English, English-LatinSimpson, D. PCassell ;, 1977978-0-02-522570-1REF PA2365.E5 C3 1977 
An elementary Latin dictionary: with brief helps for Latin readers. Lewis, Charlton ThomasOxford Univ. Press, 2010978-0-19-910205-1  
English Grammar for Students of Latin: The Study Guide for Those Learning LatinGoldman, Normalivia and Hill Press, 2004978-0-934034-34-0  
Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and CollegesAllen, Joseph Henry, J. B. Greenough, and Mahoney AnneFocus Publishing, 2001978-1585100279978-1585100279REF PA2087 .A525 2001 
Gildersleeve’s Latin GrammarGildersleeve Basil L., and Lodge GBolchazy-Carducci Publishers978-0865163539REF PA2087.G5 1997 

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
PreparationPreparation on the assigned homework evaluated during class time and by random collection.20
In-class participationRegardless of preparation, the student’s participation to class will be positively evaluated10
MidtermTranslations of passages chosen among those done during the first half of the semester, with additional questions on grammar, vocabulary and context of the Latin works selected. One sight translation passage will also be included.35
Final examTranslations of passages chosen among those done during the second half of the semester, with additional questions on grammar, vocabulary and context of the Latin works selected. One sight translation passage will also be included.35

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the cou
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Attendance will be taken at every class.

More than 6 absences regardless of the reason (that is missing more than 20% of the course) will have you fail the class.

Absences due to lack of registration into the course at the beginning of the semester still count against the 6 absences as the student is still missing parts of the course.
Every student who has accumulated ONE or less absences (regardless of the reason) by the day of the midterm will be allowed to answer to the extra credit questions on the midterm. Every student who has accumulated THREE or less absences (regardless of the reason) by the day of the final exam will be allowed to answer to the extra credit questions on the final exam.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week 1

 

Introduction to the course: syllabus, assessments, logistics, textbooks.

Placement test for the students.

 

Monday

Introduction of the course and placement test for the students

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 2


 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 3

 

 

 

Monday

 

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 4

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 5

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

 

Week 6

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 7

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

MIDTERM weeks 1-6

Duration: the entirety of the class time

 


Week 8

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 9

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 10

 

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

 

Week 11

 

Week 12

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

Week 13

 

 

Monday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

Wednesday

The program of the semester and the books used will be modeled according to the students’ preparation from Latin 100.

Week 14

 

 

Monday

Review and final questions

Wednesday

No class – Italian National Holiday (Anniversary of the Liberation from Fascism and Nazism)

Week 15

 

 

FINAL EXAM

TBA

FINAL EXAM

TBA

Do not make travel plan for this week