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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 232"
COURSE NAME: "English Literature III: The Victorians to the Modernists "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Alessandra Grego
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 10:00-11:15 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Considering major British and Irish writers since 1832, this course deals with, among other concerns, the various ways in which the Victorians and selected writers of the first half of the 20th century responded to the inheritance of Romanticism.
This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
Gender, class, technology are ideas that become central in the British 19th century and the literature of the period is intensely involved not only in describing the social and ethical conditions of its time, but also in shaping them and changing them. With the turn of the century, the increase in the reading public, the improvement of working conditions, the great political turmoil and the world wars, literature gives voice to the anxieties and  complexity of the age, its doubts and fears. A very exciting period in English literary history.
This course is a continuation of the Survey EN 231. Students will engage with a broad selection of nineteenth and early twentieth centuries texts and will be encouraged to establish connections between literature and the historical and cultural changes occurring during this period. Students are advised that the course is reading intensive and that it is essential to have read the assigned text before coming to class.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On completing this course students will have the ability to identify the key authors and genres of the Victorian age and early 20th century, they will be familiar with the principal historical events, social and political changes and the cultural ideas of the period, and they will have practiced their critical and close reading skills as well as their ability to write papers of academic quality.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Norton Anthology of English Literature: Twentieth century and Beyond volume FStephen Greenblatt et. al.Norton, 9th edition 2012ISBN-13: 978-0393912548 Please order at the Almost Corner Bookshop
Norton Anthology of English Literature The Victorian Age, volume EStephen Greenblatt et. al.Norton, 10th edition, 2018ISBN-13: 978-0393603064 Please order at the Almost Corner Bookshop
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Mid term paper2500 word paper20%
Research paper3000 words paper30%
Participation Coming to class having read and considered the assignment, prepared with questions or comments to generate or contribute to class discussion. Silent attendance does not qualify as participation.10%
Research assignmentsbrief research on specific authors, texts, or historical event 25%
 ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY THE DEADLINE - THE TOTAL GRADE OF THE PAPER WILL DROP BY 10% PER DAY OF LATENESS 
Final exam 20%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required fo
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance is mandatory. You are allowed 4 absences per term, beyond which your final grade will be affected.  Three late entries will be counted as one absence. You are considered late if you come to class after attendance has been taken.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

 -

Session

Session Focus

Reading Assignment

Other Assignment

Week 1

Introduction to the course. Methodology; what is a survey, how is it useful to study literature chronologically. Time-line: relevant historical and cultural events between 1830 and 1945.

The Victorian Age; Thomas Carlyle


 Victorian Web
www.victorianweb.org

Week 2
Jan 25-27

Thomas Carlyle continued
Evolutionism: Charles Darwin

Read Carlyle "The Everlasting No", "The Everlasting Yea"

 

Week 3

Industrialization.
The Condition of England Novel: Charles Dickens, Mary Gaskell, Charles Kingsley


 1st close reading excercise

Week 4

Gender Issues: The Victorian Gentleman & the Angel in the House

Read extracts from Charles Dickens "David Copperfield"; Coventry Patmore "The Angel in the House";

 

Week 5

Victorian poetry

Read poems by Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Robert Browning,Christina Rossetti, Swinbourne, Hopkins

 

Week 6

Empire, “Englishness” and colonialism 

Read  Rudyard Kipling "The White Man's Burden"; extracts from Charlotte Bronte "Jane Eyre"; Charles Dickens "Great Expectations"; George Eliot "Daniel Deronda" 2nd close reading excercise

Week 7

The Sensation Novel: Gothic, horror, crime

Read R.L. Stevenson "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde"

 

Week 8

Late Victorians: Dandies and Aesthetes
Viewing: Oscar Wilde, "The Importance of Being Earnest"

 Mid Term Paper Due

Week 9

Turn of the century: Modernist poetry
Read T.S. Eliot "The Waste Land"

 

Week 10  

Modernist Novel: Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, James Joyce
Read Virginia Woolf "Mr. Bennet and Mrs. Brown"

 Bibliography due

Week 11

Utopia and Dystopia: H.G. Wells, Aldus Huxley, George Orwell

 

Week 12

World War II poets: W.H. Auden

3rd close reading excercise

Week 13

The Theatre of the Absurd Read Samuel Beckett "Waiting for Godot"

 

Week 14 

Revision and conclusion

Research paper due