JCU Logo

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CMS/SOSC 325"
COURSE NAME: "Advanced Intercultural Communication "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Benjamin Lee Scribner
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 10:00-11:15 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Junior status, COM 280 and/or SOSC 202 recommended
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment or before or after class

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
In a world in which sharp inequalities often accompany cultural differences, what kinds of intercultural communication theory and practice can aid us in building constructive relationships among unequally positioned cultural identities? This course examines theoretical and practical issues in intercultural communication, as an increased awareness of asymmetrical power relationships and their historical contexts can lead to improved communication between persons from differently situated cultural identities. Drawing on case studies, this course will provide students with the opportunity to investigate how mediated power influences intercultural communication. Through lectures, screenings, written assignments, exploring Rome’s’ environment, class discussion, and engaged methodology, students will explore some of the societal issues and conflicts that are often framed as cultural and attempt to uncover the relationships of power and inequality that may reside within them. 
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course offers a comprehensive review of the mainstream theories of intercultural communication whose dimensional models of cultural values offer the kind of practical information traditionally demanded by international business, international development organizations and government.  The course introduces the post-structural or postcolonial critique of these approaches and explore the relevance of power, language, media portrayals, and historical situation to wider conflicts that are often framed as cultural.  The course explores the possibilities of incorporating a critical understanding of culture into everyday communication and experience, and asks questions about the way forward in this continually developing field.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

·       Identify the major perspectives in the field of intercultural communication.

·       Debate the ethical issues of intercultural communication in practice.

·       Use multidisciplinary theoretical perspectives to analyze media texts in their cultural context.

·       Critically assess institutional and individual intercultural communication practices.

Interpret representation in media texts. 
TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Research PaperStudents will research and write a seven-page paper on a topic chosen with the approval of the instructor. 25%
Midterm ExamThis will be a combination of short answer and short essay questions based on lectures, readings and discussions.25%
Case Study PresentationWorking in small groups, students will research a topic of current interest in intercultural communication and lead a round table discussion with each group member presenting an aspect, analysis and perspective on the issue. 15%
Final ExamThis will be a combination of short answer and short essay questions based on lectures, readings and discussions.25%
Virtual SessionStudents will connect online with students from Al Akhawayne University in Ifrane, Morocco, and write a short response to the experience. 10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance Requirements: Attendance and participation are a crucial part of the class. More than two unexcused absences will result in penalty to your final grade.  Three absences = 5% penalty.  Four absences = 10%,  etc.  If you are absent due to health reasons or family emergency, please let me know so that I can accommodate you.  Absences will not be excused due to non-emergency travel or family visits. 
Please refer to the university catalog for the attendance and absence policy.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Session

Session Focus

Reading Assignment

WK1A

Course Introduction: exploring asymmetry in cultural interaction

 

 

 

In-class reading assignment and discussion: “Commentary: American Students Abroad Can’t Be Global Citizens,” Zemach-Bersin, Talya, The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 7th, 2008

WK 1B

 

Exploring privilege, seeking authenticity in intercultural encounters

Smith, M. K. (2010). Cultural tourism in a changing world: politics, participation and (re)presentation. Chapter 11, pp. 177-190. Clevedon, UK: Channel View Publications.

WK2A

 

Nations, natives, conquerors.

Case study: The “New Africa” and South Sudan

Film: We Come As Friends

de Waal, Alex.  “Identity, rentierism, secession and conflict: Analysis and implications of the civil war in South Sudan, ” Background Papers, The Oslo Forum Network of Mediators, Oslo Forum, 2014. 

WK 2B

 

Overview Intercultural Communication: functionalism and the post-structural critique

 Reading: “Chapter 2: The History of the Study of Intercultural Communication,” in Martin, Judith N, and Thomas K. Nakayama. Intercultural Communication in Contexts. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2014.

WK3A

 

Pop music, hegemony and hybridity

Kraidy, M. M. (2002). “Hybridity in Cultural Globalization.” Communication Theory, 12 (3), 316-339.

“'I'll be going through a slum to a rich club': India's upside-down rave scene”.   The Guardian. January 5th, 2018.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/jan/05/indias-upside-down-rave-scene-magnetic-fields-festival-rajasthan

WK 3B

 

Gender, sexuality and modernity

Chaudhuri, Maitrayee, “Indian “Modernity” and “Tradition”: A Gender Analysis’, Polish Journal of Sociology 2(178)12 Analysis pp. 281-293.

Case Study Presentation Group 1: Gender, sexuality and Global Culture

WK4A

 

Gender & sexuality in intercultural context

MacLeod, Arlene Elow, “Hegemonic Relations and Gender Resistance: The New Veiling as Accommodating Protest in Cairo.” Signs, Vol. 17, No. 3 (Spring, 1992), pp. 533-557

WK4B

 

Imagined Identities, representation

Hall, Stuart,Representation & The Media” Lecture transcript, Media Education Foundation, 1997.

Case Study Presentation Group 2: Representation of identities

WK 5A

 

The “Other” in mass media and everyday life

 

“The Long Read: Typecast as Terrorist” Riz Ahmad, The Guardian, September 15th, 2016.  https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/15/riz-ahmed-typecast-as-a-terrorist

 

WK5B

Orientalism

Orientalism, Ch. 1.  Said, Edward, Routledge. 1978.

 

Wk 5C 

National identity formation in creolized societies

 

Introduction: Anderson, Benedict Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1991. Print.

 

“Imagined Nations”, Counterpunch. Uri Avnery, December, 2015.

https://www.counterpunch.org/2015/12/25/imagined-nations/

 

Case Study Presentation 3: My nation and the global citizen: is there a post-national identity?

WK 6A

Case study: Cultural Identity and Nationalism in Israel/Palestine

“Ahed Tamimi flips Zionist mythology on its head.” +972 blog. December 22, 2017

https://972mag.com/ahed-tamimi-flips-zionist-mythology-on-its-head/131783/

 

 

WK 6B

 

Case Study: Cultural Identity and Nationalism in Israel/Palestine

Yiftachel, Oren.  Ethnocracy.  Chapter 3, pages 51-83.

WK 7A

 

Review

 

WK7B

 

Midterm Exam

 

WK 8A

 

Prepare for virtual session with students from Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco

Lewis, Richard D. (2006) “The Arab Countries,” in book: When Cultures Collide. 400-423.  Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

 

Case Study Presentation 4: Open topics

WK 8B

Prepare for virtual session with students from Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco

Zaharna, rs. (2009). An Associative Approach to Intercultural Communication Competence in the Arab World. 179-195.  In book: Intercultural Communication Competence. Publisher: Sage, Editors: Darla Deardorff, pp.179-195

 

Case Study Presentation 5: Open topics

WK9A

 

Development work: the participation paradigm

Case study: India

Film: Drowned Out

WK9B

 

Participation and the subaltern (continued)

Case study: India

Dutta, M. J. (2015), “Decolonizing Communication for Social Change: A Culture-Centered Approach.” Communication Theory, 25: 123–143.

WK 10A

Case study: Negotiating race, religion, nationality and citizenship in Italy

 

Thomassen , Bjørn ‘Second Generation Immigrants’ or ‘Italians with Immigrant Parents’? Italian and European Perspectives on Immigrants and their Children. Bulletin of Italian Politics Vol. 2, No. 1, 2010, 21-44.

WK 10B

 

Case study: Negotiating race, religion, nationality and citizenship in Italy

 (continued)

 Pagano, Simona. “Framing racism and intolerance: public issues and denunciations in Italy. Chasing the Gypsy, immolating the Gypsy, securing the city” Tolerance Project Working Paper, 20. European University Viadrina, 2012.

Case Study presentation 6: Rom peoples in Italian society: perceptions and realities

WK11A

 

Case study:

Media narratives of race in the US (continued)

Langford, Catherine L. Speight, Montené . “#BlackLivesMatter: Epistemic Positioning, Challenges, and Possibilities.”  Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric, Vol. 5, No.3/4, 2015, pp. 78-89.

Screening of episode from: Dear White People

WK 11B

Exploring Racial Identity

In class reading: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

Case Study presentation 7: Racial identity in my society, experiences and reflections

WK 12A

 

Connecting theory to practice in intercultural communication (continued)

Jensen, Iben, “The Practice of Intercultural Communication.” Journal of Intercultural Communication, Issue 6, February 2003

WK 12B

Connecting theory to practice in intercultural communication

Case Study Presentation 8: An “informed” intercultural experience – what worked, what didn’t.

WK 13A

Catch up day

 

WK13B

Catch up day

WK 14A

Review

 

Exam Week