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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 143 "
COURSE NAME: "World Art III: Visual Culture of the Early Modern World"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Laura Foster
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 1:30-2:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This survey course focuses on the art and architecture of Europe, South and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas from the late 1200s to c. AD 1750. The course investigates a range of media including painting, woodcuts, sculpture, and architecture, while considering materials and methods of production. Special attention will be given to the socio-economic and political contexts in which these artifacts were commissioned and produced. The course will also assist students in cultivating basic art-historical skills, in particular description, stylistic analysis, and iconographic and iconological analysis.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
The historical period was one of new cultural encounter, prompted by religious, scientific, and economic interests that resulted in travel throughout the world. Proceeding roughly according to chronology, the first half of the course will concentrate upon the world before 1492, examining developments in Western Europe, China, Japan, India and the Americas. The second half of the course focuses upon the dramatic economic and religious upheavals in the wake of European colonial expansion, studying the way art and architecture was put into service of the ideologies of empire. The course will examine cultural exchange and the modes in which art was transformed through intercultural contact. The material qualities of artworks will be a special focus of the semester, with examination of how medium and presentation affect meaning and interpretation.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

•The ability to analyze and describe material artifacts and built form from different cultural and historical environments using the appropriate art-historical terminology

•Knowledge base of major works of art and architecture that have shaped an understanding of culture in the period under consideration.

•Familiarity with the historical protagonists who produced and commissioned key works of art (artists, patrons and other important figures)

•Knowledge of the stories in which many visual works were based (religious, mythological, biographical) and the ability to see differences in how those stories were represented in different times and geographical regions (iconography)

•An understanding of the historical changes in images and built form based in the matrix of religion, economy, and intellectual discovery.

•The ability to distinguish among different methodological approaches used to interpret works of art and architecture.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Gardner's Art Through the Ages, A Global History Vol. II 15th International ed.Fred KleinerCengage9781285839394  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
3 Tests (15% each)The three tests follow individual historical units and will include image identifications, questions regarding terminology and concepts discussed during lectures, and image comparisons. The works and terms to study are listed on study guides which are uploaded to Moodle. See the course schedule for individual test dates.45
Analytical Essay: Materials and TechniquesThis first essay will permit students to explore in depth the process of making a work of art in one particular medium through direct observation. Students are required to go to a museum or church in Rome to document one work in particular and then to write an analysis of the work based on the medium in which it is made, whether painting or sculpture. Suggestions for works and further instructions will be provided.15
Analytical Essay: Constructing Meaning through Symbols and NarrativeIn this essay, students connect the material qualities of the work to subject matter, selecting either the same work examined in the first essay or another one. The essay will describe the subject and explain aspects of its iconography. The analysis will also discuss the artist’s particular approach to the subject, especially if he/she makes significant modifications to a tradition of its representation. 15
Final ExaminationThe final exam will include a test of material from the last quarter of the semester as well as broader questions regarding key works and concepts covered over the entire semester through short essays. 25

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

 This syllabus has been updated as of January 21, 2019. A copy of the complete syllabus will be distributed in class.

Date

Lecture Topic

Reading Assignments

Tests and Assignments

Jan 22

Course Introduction and Overview

 

Gardner, “Architectural Basics” and “Religion and Mythology” (pp. xxii-xxxi), and “Introduction: What is art history?” (pp. 1-13)

 

 

Jan 24

Visual Traditions: Exploring Naturalism and Abstraction

 

 

 

 

Jan 29

Italy: The Trecento

Gardner, Ch. 14

 

 

Jan 31

Italy: The Trecento

 

 

 

Feb 5

Late Gothic and Early Renaissance Art in Northern Europe

 

Gardner, Ch. 20

 

Feb 7

Late Gothic and Early Renaissance in Northern Europe

 

 

 

 

Feb 12

TEST 1

 

 

Test 1

Feb 14

China: Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties

 

Gardner, Ch. 33

 

Feb 19

Italian Renaissance Art of the 15th Century

 

Gardner, Ch. 21

 

Feb 21

Italian Renaissance Art of the 15th Century

 

 

 

Feb 22

*official Makeup lecture

Site Visit: Church of S. Maria sopra Minerva

 

 

Class will meet directly in front of the church, Piazza di Minerva (adjacent to the Pantheon)

 

Feb 26

Japan: Muromachi, Momoyama and Edo

 

Gardner, Ch. 34

 

Feb 28

India: Vijayanagar and Mughal Empires

 

ESSAY 1 MUST BE UPLOADED TO MOODLE BY 5:00 P.M.

Mar 5

Central and South America: Aztec and Inka Empires

 

Gardner, Ch. 35

 

 

 

Mar 7

TEST 2

 

TEST 2

 

Spring Break March 11 – 15

 

Mar 19

Italian Renaissance Art of the 16th Century: Florence and Rome

 

 

Gardner, Ch. 22

 

Mar 21

Italian Renaissance Art of the 16th Century: Northern Italy and Mannerism

 

 

 

Mar 26

Italian Renaissance: Northern Italy and Mannerism

 

 

 

Mar 28

The Renaissance in Northern Europe and Spain

 

Gardner, Ch. 23

 

Apr 2

The Renaissance in Northern Europe and Spain

 

 

 

Apr 4

TEST 3

 

 

TEST 3

Apr 9

The Baroque in Italy and Spain

 

Gardner, Ch. 24

 

Apr 11

The Baroque in Italy and Spain

 

 

 

Apr 16

The Baroque in Northern Europe

 

Gardner, Ch. 25

 

Apr 18

The Baroque in Northern Europe

 

 

 

Apr 23

Effects of Colonialism in Central and South America and in Asia

 

 

 

ESSAY 2 MUST BE UPLOADED TO MOODLE BY 5:00 P.M.

Apr 25

HOLIDAY – NO LECTURE

 

Apr 30

Rococo to Neoclassicism

 

Gardner, Ch. 26

 

May 2

Neoclassicism: the 18th Century in Europe and Colonial North America

 

 

 

 

Final exam date, time and location to be announced