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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 210"
COURSE NAME: "Introduction to Poetry and Poetics "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Lewis Samuel Klausner
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS:
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Major theories concerning the nature and source of poetic talent and a consideration of the traditional aspects of prosody and poetic form. The course emphasis falls upon competence with poetry as an art form rather than upon the knowledge of particular poets or literary periods.This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
We will read mostly short, that is to say lyric, poetry (poems generally shorter than 100 lines long), though we will make a few excursions into some longer pieces of verse. We will read in various stanza and metrical forms (ballad, sonnet, villanelle, ghazal, dramatic monologue, sestina, free verse, syllabic verse). We will read in genres by genre (elegy, pastoral, aubade, hymn), and by subject (parents and children, love, crime, history, nature, philosophical meditation etc.) Students will write about these poems demonstrating understanding of techinical as well as thematic interest of the poems.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will be able to read poems with better understanding and appreciation of their artistry. They will be able to write about poems informatively and coherently.
TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Paper One (analysis of a poem)  15
Paper Two (comparison of two poems)  15
Paper Three (analysis of a group of poems)  15
Midterm Exam  20
Final Exam  20
Class Participation  15

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Three absences, excused or unexcused, are allowed. Starting with the fourth absence, excused or unexcused, points may be deducted for each absence.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week One
Introduction. I Say A Peacock With A Fiery Tale. Popular Songs and Meter

Poems of child and parent:
My Papa's Waltz, Those Winter Sundays, Piano, The Glass, On My First Son.

Week Two
Folk Ballads; Sir Patrick Spens, Lord Randal,: Middle English Lyrics : The Cuckoo Song, Alison, Westen Wind, I am of Irelan.

Wyatt, Surrey, Petrarch, and the Sonnet in English Before Shakespeare. They Flee From Me, Whoso List to Hunt, My Lute Awake, Love that Doth Reign,


Week Three
Renaissance Sonnet Seqences: Sydney, Spenser Shakespeare,

Renaissnace Sonnets.


Week Four
Seventeenth Century Love and Religion: Donne Herbert, Drayton, Marvell

Seventeenth Century Love and Religion

Week Five
Romantic Lyric; Wordsworth, Coleridge and Lyrical Ballads

Romantic Lyric; Keats

Week Six
Shelley

Victorians; Tennyson, Browning

Week Seven
American Poetry in the 19th Century; Whitman

American 19th Century; Dickinson

Week Eight
Edwardian Poetryç Hardy, Frost, Edward Thomas

Frost

Week Nine
Modernism ; William Carlos Willians, T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore

Modernism: Wallace Stevens,

Week Ten
Twentieth Centuryt Britain and Ireland, Yeats

Auden, Empson, Dylan Thomas,


Week Eleven
 African American Poetry before the Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance and After

Week Twelve
The poetry of Women's Experience

Poetry of Immigration, Dissent, Unease,

Week Thirteen
Poetry as argument and meditation from Pope to Graham

Poetry as argument and meditation

Week Fourteen
Summation