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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 103-5"
COURSE NAME: "Intensive English Composition "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: James Teasdale
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 10:00-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 6
PREREQUISITES: This course carries 6 semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: Placement via JCU English Composition Placement Exam
OFFICE HOURS: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This intensive course has two components. One concentrates on developing the ability to write grammatically and idiomatically correct English prose, and includes an in-depth grammar review and examination of academic register. The other focuses on the elements of academic writing, from sentence structure through effective paragraph writing in essays, and introduces students to the various rhetorical modes. Elements covered include outlining, the introduction-body-conclusion structure, thesis statements, topic sentences, supporting arguments, and transition signals. Students will also become familiar with the fundamentals of MLA style, research and sourcing, as well as information literacy. To develop these skills, students will write in- and out-of-class essays. Critical reading is also integral to the course, and students will analyze peer writing as well as good expository models. Individual students in EN 103 may be required to complete additional hours in the English Writing Center as part of their course requirements. Students must receive a grade of C or above in this course to be eligible to take EN110. Students who receive a grade ranging from C- to D- can take EN105 or repeat EN103. Students who receive an F must repeat EN103.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course focuses heavily on developing a keen understanding of academic essay construction, which can be effectively deployed by the student. Therefore, the course is constructed around lessons and workshops which explore various rhetorical modes, alongside in-class and at-home essay writing which puts the new skills to use. Elements touched upon include various essay styles and functions, writing from the sentence through the paragraph to the complete essay as well as the analysis of expository essays. However, apart from writing, and emphasis is also placed on critical thinking and the careful planning of arguments and positions whuch will ultimately be converted into essay content. Practical skills covered include the proper use of MLA citation, effective sourcing and the foundations for research papers. Alongside this general writing vein will be a parallel focus on grammar, with tutoring improving overall grammatical understanding which will in turn feed into the writing practice.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
By the end of the course students will have a strong understanding of different rhetorical modes, their purpose and uses and the varying content and structural requirements of each. Students will be able to produce refined academic essays, with strong structural coherence and unity in which can be found logical and critical arguments suitable for different purposes and contexts. Students will also have a more nuanced approach to critical reading, in particular in appreciating how far this can inform their own writing style. As part of EN-103 this overall standard will have to be complemented by a strong command of correct and appropriate grammatical elements.

To pass EN-103 students will have to demonstrate the ability to,

RHETORIC
-Write effective sentences, paragraphs and essays and have these operate as a whole
-Understand each of the rehtorical modes covered, including their fundamental characteristics and when each should be utilised
-Prepare useful and effective outlines in the planning stage
-Proffread and edit drafts
-Deploy thesis statements, topic sentences and supporting arguments within essays
-Construct indtroductions, body paragraphs and conclusions
-Produce logically robust essay content
-Think critically throughout the writing process

READING
-Read complex and demanding material from various academic and literary contexts
-Engage with aofrementioned material in a critical manner

VOCABULARY
-Develop a strong range of vocabulary which can be used appropriately depending on specific tasks and audiences
-Constantly expand vocabulary for the benefit of written pieces

GRAMMAR
-Use correct grammar appropriate for English prose
-Use different grammatical functions in a sophisticated way

RESEARCH
-Develop research skills necessary for the researching and evaluation of different sources
-Use MLA citation formatting correctly
-Avoid plagiarism

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
In Class Essays 35
At Home Essays 35
Final Exam 30

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
If you are unable to attend a classm you should make arrangements with one or more of your classmates to catch up on anything missed. While illness and emergencies are often unavoidable and understandable, this does not affect how the absence policy will be applied.

You are allowed 3 absences during the semester. Any subsequent absences will have a detrimental effect on the final grade. Morethan 3 bsences by mid-term will constitute a mid-term warning. After 5 absences another waening informs you that your chances of passing the course are at rish. Seven absences, in total, will result in a failure to pass the course.

Any absences will not act as an excuse for a failure to catch up on missed assignments or to not submit homework on the agreed date. Each day that passes after the agreed assignment date will consitute a full letter grade deduction.

Class participation is considered to be part of the final grade for this course. All students must come to class having prepared the necessart materials for the day on time. Students are required to arrive on time na dto remain for the full class period.

Laptops and mobile phones, under all circumstances unless explictely allowed by the professor, are prohibitted in class.

Disruptive behaviour will result in dismissal, which in turn  will be considered as one full absence. Disruptibe behaviour includes repeteaed leaving and entering the class, completing work for other classes, eating, use of computers or mobile phone, talking to others while someone else is talking as part of the class, arriving late to class, profanity, personal or physical threats and the damaging of property. 
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

 

1. Course introduction / Syllabus outline / Academic etiquette and disciplinary rules / Paragraphs (Introduction)

 

2.  Rhetorical modes (expository essay) / In depth workshop on introduction paragraphs (context, topic, thesis statements and body preview) / Introduction to body paragraphs

 

WEEK 2

 

3. Rhetorical modes (clarification essays) / In depth workshop on body paragraphs (leading idea, claims, support, unity and coherence)

 

4. The writing process (purpose, prewriting, organising, drafting, revising, editing and proofreading) / Workshop on prewriting and planning / HOMEWORK ESSAY 1

 

WEEK 3

 

5. Conclusion workshop / Essay structure review

 

6. Discussion and annotation (Essay) / ESSAY 1 DUE

 

WEEK 4

 

7. Rhetorical modes (extended definition essays) / Sentence structure / Workshop on extended definition essay

 

8. IN-CLASS ESSAY 1 (extended definition)

 

WEEK 5

 

9.Library session

 

10. Rhetorical modes (cause and effect essays) / Chain, block, distinguishing cause and effect / Workshop on cause and effect essay / HOMEWORK ESSAY 2

 

WEEK 6

 

11. Ethos, Pathos, Logos / Rhetorical modes (argumentative essays)

 

12. Argumentative essay in depth (block, point by point, counter argument and rebuttal, pre-planning) / HOMEWORK ESSAY 2 DUE

 

WEEK 7

 

13. IN-CLASS ESSAY 2 (argumentative)

 

14. Library session

 

WEEK 8

 

15. Rhetorical modes (summary response essays) / Essay (Calvino)

 

16. Workshop on summary response essay / Discuss and annotate Calvino essay / HOMEWORK ESSAY 3

 

WEEK 9

 

17. Rhetorical modes (problem solution essays) / Paragraphs (point by point, block and transition) / Article (plastic)

 

18. Discuss and annotate article / Workshop on problem solution essay / HOMEWORK ESSAY 3 DUE

 

WEEK 10

 

19. IN-CLASS ESSAY 3 (problem solution)

 

20. Grammar elements (academic writing)

 

WEEK 11

 

21. Rhetorical modes (process essays)

 

22. IN-CLASS ESSAY 4

 

WEEK 12

 

23. Rhetorical modes (cause and effect essays)

 

24. Research papers

 

WEEK 13

 

25. MLA citation

 

26. Course review

 

WEEK 14

 

27. Preparation for finals exam

 

28. Preperation for finals exam

 

N.B ALTERATIONS TO SCHEDULE MAY BE CARRIED OUT DURING THE SEMESTER