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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "HS 369"
COURSE NAME: "History of American Indian Resistance in the United States"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Andrea Lanzone
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 3:00-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: Junior Standing; Corequisite: EN 110
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Native American resistance has occurred throughout the centuries and continues at present. This seminar aims at analyzing historic and contemporary Native American strategies of survival and the various forms of interaction and relations they have had with the U.S Government. Starting with an examination of different processes of territorial colonization of Indigenous territories and resources, the seminar will then investigate the legal, political, social, and cultural significance of resistance and self-determination.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The class will discuss the assigned readings. Students’ active participation in discussions is absolutely necessary to making the course work well. The very high percentage of the final grade will be based on class participation. There will be two class meetings per week. Lectures will be followed by questions and discussion. All assigned readings should be completed before each class meeting.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
The seminar is intended to provide a study of American Indians’ Resistance from a humanistic viewpoint  to present an opportunity for critical analysis and evaluation of the experience, perspectives and continued evolution of Native cultures. One of the aims of the course is to enhance student's skills in critical thinking and reading. To this end, students shall investigate one key event in the Native Americans’ history. Group discussions will be a central part of the course structure.
TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
In the Spriti of Crazy Horse Peter matthiessenHarvil1-86046-100-X  
Native America and the question of GenocideAlex Alvarez Rowman & Littlefield 978-1-4422-5646-0  
Native Liberty: Natural Reason and Cultural Survivance Gerald VizenorUniversity of Nebraska Press978-0-8032-1892-5   
Say We Are NationsDaniel CobbThe university of North Carolina press978-1-4696-2480-8   

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Attendance and Participation 30%
Midterm Exam  10%
Paper#1 15%
Paper#2 15%
Final Exam 30%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

More than two absences will have a negative effect on the grade, the more absences, the negative-er the effect.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

  1. Introduction: 500 YEARS OF INDIGENOUS RESISTANCE

  2. Definition of “Indigenous” and “Peoples”

    UN Declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples

  3. State of the Indigenous Peoples of America

    Self determination, cultural independency, freedom, equality, education

  4. American Indian Movement: An Introduction

  5. HIS: Indian Health Service

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs

  6. Charles Vizenor’s “Survivance”

    Historic Resistance: Pontiac and Tecumseh

    Historic Resistance: Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse

    Historic Resistance: Geronimo, Chief Joseph, Quanah Parker

  7. Formation of AIM, the American Indian Movement, in Minneapolis, 1968

    The occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay, 1969

  8. Black Mesa, New Mexico and Big Mountain—Navajo and Hopi struggles against strip mining and pollution, in defense of their sacred mountain, 1969

  9. Puyallup and Tulalip Indians, Washington, fishing struggles (”fish-ins”), 1970

    Pit River fishing rights struggles (“fish-ins”), California, confrontation with US Marshals, Forest Services, PG & E, 1971.

  10. AIM protest & disruption against re-enactment of Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts, 1970 - Occupation of Mount Rushmore, 1971

  11. AIM and other native groups organize the Trail of Broken Treaties, a caravan from the west coast to Washington, DC. 1972

  12. Occupation of Wounded Knee, 1973,

  13. Incident at Oglala, on the Pine Ridge reservation, 1975

  14.  The Mohawk occupation of Ganienkeh in state of New York begins, 1974

    Founding of the International Indian Treaty Council, South Dakota, 1974

  15. Protests against the 500-year anniversary of Columbus’ invasion of the Americas, 1992

  16. The legacy of the American Indian Movement

    The new AIM

  17. Indian Nations today

    How Indigenous peoples deal with the effects of colonization.

    Education, land claims, sovereignty, and socio-economic issues.

  18. The Indian Allotment Act, Reorganization Act, Termination Policy,

  19. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act,  

  20. Indian Child Welfare Act.

CASE STUDIES

  1. Navajo Nation:

    • Land dispossession

    • Tradition’s erosion

    • Economic and social issues

  1. Hopi Nation:

    • Focus in the land fight against the Navajo

  2. Apache Nation:

    • Poverty, Lack of natural resources and Isolation in the Apache Nation

  3. Iroquois League:

    • Cooperation among Iroquois Nations: The League of Five Nations

  4. Lakota Sioux Nation:

    • Human Rights violations and Political Rights violations

    • “Children Rescue Project”

    • Lakota’s view of Economy, Work, and Society

    • The White clay case

    • Legacy of The American Indian Movement

    • The Black Hills Case