JCU Logo

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CL/RH 372"
COURSE NAME: "Classical Rhetoric and Oratory "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Thomas Govero
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 4:30-5:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110
OFFICE HOURS: By appointment including weekends

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
An examination of the nature, purpose, and place of rhetoric in classical antiquity, as conceived and practiced by ancient Greeks and Romans. Readings (in translation) include the use and conceptualization of an art of persuasion by Gorgias, Plato, Isocrates, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Cicero, Quintilian, and Augustine. This course prepares students to evaluate the use (and abuse) of devices and techniques of classical rhetoric in contemporary politics, economics, marketing, media, and visual arts.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
SCOPE AND AIMS OF THE COURSE
The course will examine and analyze the theories and developments of ancient rhetoric (Greek and Roman) from Homer (8th cent. CE?) to Aelius Aritides (2nd cent. CE), Augustine (4th - 5th centuries CE), and finally Boethius (6th cent. CE).
The development and evolution of Greco-Roman rhetoric was a singular, unique process in the history of human language skills and thought although Indian rhetoricians developed a very dissimilar theory and practice of rhetoric in later centuries.  Greco-Roman rhetoric and oratory formed the center-piece of education in antiquity and heavily impacted on philisophical and political theories and practices.  Thus, rhetoric, philosophy and politics formed a tri-partate unity in the formation of those societies. 
These same concepts and techniques in rhetoric are still studied, practiced and applicable today after 2,500 years.  They were highly influential in the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and in the formation of Republican and Democratic ideas and politics after the 18th century such as the American Republic.
The course, therefore, will include excursus on the history, political and philosophical developments, and other contextual elements if classical rhetoric and oratory as they intersected with one another. 

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT
The course will include the following topics,developments, authors and themes:

I.  Early Developments:
.  Homer, Iliad Book I, II. 245 - 298, "Nestor's Speech";  Book IX, "The Embassy to Achilles".
.  The case of Corax and Tiseas.  The Sophists.  Development from oral poetry to written prose.  
   Sophistic theories and approaches to language, reality and truth.  Eikos/Probability and other values of Sophistic rhetoric. Gorgias, Protagoras,      Isocrates.
.  Plato:  Gorgias, Protagoras, Phaedrus; group reports (see:  "Criteria and Guidelines for Group Reports")
.  Gorgias:  Enconium to Helen, Defense of Palamides (see:  "Criteria and Guidelines for Group Reports")
.  Thucydides:  Peloponesian War:  Melian Dialogue, Dialogue of Cleon and Diodatus.   Book 3. 49;  
   Pericles, Funeral Speech.
Selections from Attic Orators such as Lysias
.  Aristophanes:  Birds  (Critiquing and satirizing the Sophists)
.  Isocrates:  Aeroeopagitucus ("A Few Wise Laws Wisely Administered")

II.  Aristotle and Hellenistic Rhetoric:
.    Aristotle, "Rhetoric" (selections)

III. Roman Rhetoric:
 .    Cicero:  On the Orator, Pro Archia, Pro Caelio (other speeches in individual presentations)
 .    Livy:     Speeches from the History of Rome  in individual presentations.
.     Tacitus:  Dialogue on Oratory
.     Aelius Aristides:  On Rome
.    
Selections from Augustine and Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy

IV.  Modern Discussions and Interpretations
.     Michel Foucault, Parrhesia
.     Roland Barthes, On the Old Rhetoic
.     Walter J. Ong S.J., The Present State of Scholarship in the History of Rhetoric
.     The Alphabet Effect
.     Other articles may be assigned as well to complement the above interpretations.

V.  Historical, cultural and philosophical contexts of the above selections in the Greek and Roman worlds.

VI. Methodologies:   Heuristics, dialogue, dialect, dirigesis, stasis, compositional styles.

Note:  The above works will be reviewed, discussed and analyzed for their techniques of persuasion, style of presentation and prose developments.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the semester students should be able to:
.  Analyze in detail the techniques, style, figures of speech and thought, and organization of Greek and Rome examples of rhetoric.
.  Be familiar with the overall development of Greek and Roman rhetoric
.  Be familiar with the overall contemporary historical and political developments of Greece and Rome and how they influenced, and were influenced by rhetorical developments
.  Understand the interces of rhetoric, philosophy and politics.
.  Be able to demonstrate the use of classical rhetorical techniques and organization in oral presentations
.  Be aware of the impact of classical rhetoric on subsequent and especially contemporary rhetoic and prose expression.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
SCOPE AND AIMS OF THE COURSE
The course will examine and analyze the theories and developments of ancient rhetoric (Greek and Roman) from Homer (8th cent. BCE?) to Aelius Aritides (2nd cent. CE), Augustine (4th - 5th centuries BCE), and finally Boethius (6th cent. BCE).
The development and evolution of Greco-Roman rhetoric was a singular, unique process in the history of human language skills and thought although Indian rhetoricians developed a very dissimilar theory and practice of rhetoric in later centuries. Greco-Roman rhetoric and oratory formed the center-piece of education in antiquity and heavily impacted on philisophical and political theories and practices.  Thus, rhetoric, philosophy and politics formed a tri-partate unity in the formation of those societies. 
These same concepts and techniques in rhetoric are still studied, practiced and applicable today after 2,500 years.  They were highly influential in the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and in the formation of Republican and Democratic ideas and politics after the 18th century such as the American Republic.  
The course, therefore, will include excursus on the history, political and philosophical developments, and other contextual elements if classical rhetoric and oratory as they intersected with one another.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Ancient Rhetoric from Aristotle to PhilostratusNone/VariousPenguin978-0-141-39264-6 Almost Corner
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
One oral, group presentationSee: "Guidelines and Criteria" for this presentation.10%
One individual oral presentation (about 20 minutes)Requirements: Outline and resume of examples from Classical Rhetoic. See: "Criteria and Guidelines" for this presentation15%
Midterm PaperFive pages with citations. See: "Criteria and Guidelines" for this paper15%
In-class résumésTen short paragraphs written on the prompt which will be given at beginning of class. These are part of the final exam and will be handed-in with the final paper10%
Final Paper10 Pages with citations on a topic to be individually chosen are chosen in consultation with instructor30%
ParticipationIn-class discussion including attendance20%
Honors OptionHonors: Midterm and Final Paper: Midterm = 10 pages; final paper 20 pages. The Final paper will be a research paper and involve two meetings with the instructor in preparation for writing the paper. In addition, an oral review to the entire class must be given (10 - 15 minutes)25% (over and above the percentage listed below)

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the cour
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
SCOPE AND AIMS OF THE COURSE
The course will examine and analyze the theories and developments of ancient rhetoric (Greek and Roman) from Homer (8th cent. BCE?) to Aelius Aritides (2nd cent. CE), Augustine (4th - 5th centuries BCE), and finally Boethius (6th cent. BCE). The development and evolution of Greco-Roman rhetoric was a singular, unique process in the history of human language skills and thought although Indian rhetoricians developed a very dissimilar theory and practice of rhetoric in later centuries. Greco-Roman rhetoric and oratory formed the center-piece of education in antiquity and heavily impacted on philisophical and political theories and practices.  Thus, rhetoric, philosophy and politics formed a tri-partate unity in the formation of those societies.
These same concepts and techniques in rhetoric are still studied, practiced and applicable today after 2,500 years.  They were highly influential in the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and in the formation of Republican and Democratic ideas and politics after the 18th century such as the American Republic. The aim of the course, therefore, will include excursus on the history, political and philosophical developments, and other contextual elements if classical rhetoric and oratory as they intersected with one another.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

SessionSession FocusReading AssignmentOther AssignmentMeeting Place/Exam Dates
Week 1: Mon. Wed, Jan 21, 23Introduction to the course, readings, assignments and assessment. Walter J. Ong S.J., "The Present State of Scholarship in the History of Rhetoric" Homer, Iliad, Book I "Speech of Nestor"; Book 9, Lines 316 - 522, "The Embassy to Achilles" "Introduction to Classical Rhetoric" (handout)Ancient Rhetoric pp. 3 -21 
Week 2: Mon. Wed., Jan. 28, 30Developments in Greek history and society 1400 BCE - 403BCE; the context of Greek rhetoric. Discussions of Ong and Homer "On Reading Plato" The 5th and 4th centuries Greek "Enlightenment"; Polis, Logos and Rhetoric, logic, truth/reality, the SophistsGorgias, "Enconium to Helen"; "Defense of Palamides"Ancient Rhetoric pp. 27 - 38 
Week 3: Mon. Wed. Feb. 4, 6"How to Read a Text" Review and discussion of Ong, Homer, and Gorgias' Helen and Palamides; Resumes No. 1Ancient Rhetoric pp. 1 - 23  
Week 4: Mon. Wed. Feb. 11, 13Quiz Ancient Rhetoric, pp. 11 - 13 Havelock Readings: Individual reading assignments IQuiz. Ancient Rhetoric pp. 3 - 58
Week 5, Mon. Wed. Feb. 18, 20Individual presenations on Havelock readings Discussion of paper 1: Criteria and Guidelines. Plato, Protagoras  
Week 6: Mon. Wed. Feb. 25, 27Review of Plato, "Protagoras": Theme, rhetorical elements, roles, conclusions.Plato, "Phaedrus"   
Week 7: Mon. Wed. Fri. March 4, 6, 8 (Make-up day)Résumé No. 3; Discussion of Plato, "Phaedrus"Thucydides, "Peloponesian War: the Melian Dialogue" and "Mytilenian Dialogue"  
Week 8: March 11, 13 Spring Break    
Week 9: Mon. Wed. March 18, 20Foucault, "Parrhesia" Pericles, "Funeral Speech"Aristotle, "Rhetoric" (selections)Paper 1 Due 
Week 10: Mon. Wed. March 18, 20Résumé No. 4; Review and Discussion of No. 1: Aristotle, Rhetoric Continued reading of Aristotle  
Week 11: Mon. Wed. March 25, 27Review and catch-up: Rhetoric, Dialectic, and SophistryVittorio Hosle "The Philosophical Dialogue" Chap 2, "Conversation and Dialogue"None 
Week 12:: Mon. Wed. April 1, 3Review of V. Hosle Review and Discussion of Aristotle, "Rhetoric" II None  
Week 13: Mon. Wed. April 8, 10Rise of Hellenism: Stoicism and Epicureanism. Philodemus of Garda, Overview of the Roman Republic and rhetoric. The career of Cicero. Ancient Rhetoric pp. 65 - 180Individual presentations II: Cicero: "Pro Archia", "Pro Caelio", "Pro Cluentio""Pro Roscio" "De Oratore" (two parts), Cataline 1,2,3  
Week 14: Mon. Wed. April 15, 17Discussion of paper 2 Presentations    
Week 15: Wed. April 24Presentations: Cicero   Quiz on Ancient Rhetoric
Week 16: Mon. April 28, Wed. May 1 (Last class)Presentations, Cicero Paper 2 due: May 13