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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 299-A"
COURSE NAME: "Special Topics in Art History: Classicism"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2019
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Linford
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of concern in the field of Art History. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern.
May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

 

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

 

AH 299A Special Topics in Art History: 

Classicism: from Renaissance to Contemporary Art

Spring 2019

 

Instructor: Dr. Sarah Linford

[email protected]

3924877920

 

Hours/place: TTH 11:30-12:45 PM  

(note that Friday, February 22nd is Makeup day for Thursday, April 25)

 

TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45 

CREDITS: 3 

PREREQUISITES: none

 

OFFICE HOURS:

Thursday 1:45-2pm by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Specialized course offered periodically on specific aspects of art history. “Special Topics in Art History courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

 

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT: 

The “classical tradition,” or classicism, derived from the art of the ancient Greco-Roman world, is a privileged vantage point from which to view the history of art until the historical avant-gardes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and to this day. This course examines the birth, meanings, and varied significance of the "classical" as attributed to ancient art; its purported rediscovery and reworking in the Renaissance. It then turns to the “neo-Classicism” of the 18th century, including what this return meant in socio-political terms and how variegated were its forms throughout Europe and the United States. Modern art's alternate historicism and disavowal of the subjects, values and institutions associated with classicism and, finally, how it has resurfaced, often ironically, in contemporary practices conclude this course. For in fact, far from disappearing, classicism continues to have a powerful impact, remaining present not only in the fine arts but also in cinema, photography, design and architecture. Students will acquire a clear sense of what classicism has been made to stand for, how it has been repurposed and how, in its many forms, it has pervaded the history and ideology of culture and the traditions of the West, from Antiquity to today.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

You will be able to:

 

·     

·         Gain an understanding of critical approaches to classicism and culture

 

·         Explore the legacies of the visual culture of intimately linked esthetic and political debates

 

·         Develop advanced skills in the analysis of art, from painting and sculpture to film, architecture and the decorative arts

 

·         Engage critically with theoretical and historical texts and deploy these in the analysis of visual examples

 

·         Analyze the visual culture of these period in its historical and political context

 

·         Structure and write an essay using visual analysis and cited research as evidence

 

 

GRADING POLICY 

 

-ASSESSMENT METHODS: 

 

Assignment - Guidelines - Weight

Preparation and Participation in class discussions This course meets only once per week and is largely on site; therefore, attendance is essential. The lectures are not composed simply of a tour of monuments, but will involve complex analysis at the sites themselves. In order to grasp the concepts presented in course readings and hand-outs, participation is essential. Students will be evaluated on their attention to lectures by questions asked and ideas discussed. Engagement with in-class assignments will also be evaluated. 20%

 

One written response to one of the required readings to serve as introduction to the discussion of that week’s readings; the written response may be posted for student comments at least 24 hours or handed in to the professor at the beginning of that class. The response demonstrates the student’s ability to briefly summarize, problematize and open up the chosen reading to larger discussion.    10%

 

Mid-term The midterm examination will be composed of:

•Short answer questions: Definitions of terms, specific questions regarding artworks we have observed or issues discussed in the assigned readings

•Slide comparisons: identify 2 works, their makers and dates, then compare and contrast the works in a short essay, supporting your discussion with relevant information from assigned readings and lectures 

•Essay: topics that treat general themes discussed in the first half of the course. You will need to provide specific examples taken from works discussed in class. 25%

 

Term Paper You will produce a term paper of on a specific artwork pertinent to the class topic. The paper will be based on a combination of research and direct observation, drawing on the visual and critical skills developed in class. A list of suggested topics will be provided, though students may suggest their own topics, to be approved by the professor. Please refer to the course outline below for deadlines. 20%

 

Final Exam The format for the final exam will be the same as the midterm, with slide identifications and comparisons covering only material since the midterm. The essay questions will be on topics taken from themes discussed in the entire course. 25%

 

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: 

A Work of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.

B This is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.

C This is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.

D This level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.

F This work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

 

 

 

 

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS: 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY 

You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until Friday, December 14th, 2018.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY 

As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.

 

STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES

John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

 

CLASS HOURS

 

TTH 11:30-12:45 PM

(Note: Make-up class scheduled on Friday, February 22nd to make-up for the holiday on Thursday, April 25th)

 

SCHEDULE:

Course outline and assignments.

 

Week 1           Introductory lecture

Course content and logistics.

 

            

Rediscovering the classical

Our second class will explore the key concepts and figures that defined Renaissance understanding of ancient Greek and Roman art. We will address competition between major artistic figures, the influence of the classical on artistic status and styles, and the contribution of these to the particular dynamism of Renaissance art and architecture. We will detail the major innovations and characteristics of the Renaissance in Italy, then focus on specific paintings and sculptures by artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Titian and Raphael.

 

 

                              

 

Week 2 On iconographical uses and re-uses of the classical

Our Tuesday class will take a more thematic approach, probing through a particular case-study how the iconography of the classical past was integrated in variegated ways in 15th and 16th-century art.  This case-study will lead us to consider the issues of artistic narrative, the role of patrons, the spectator and the context of viewing art in the Early Modern period — and the role played in these of referencing Antiquity.

 

Our second class, week 2, will be an on-site visit of some of the Renaissance works discussed.

 

Week 3 An international style?

We will begin week 3 by considering how classicism migrated, was established and integrated into French art through cross-cultural influence in the 16th and 17th centuries. Students will consider how “the classical” entered French art and the Schools of Fontainebleau. This class will then address the founding of the French Academy and the work of Poussin, focusing on the language and rhetoric of classicism in 17th century France. 

 

Our second class, week 3, will compare French and Italian neoclassicisms with the reception and uses of Antiquity in Germany and Great Britain.

 

Week 4 18th-century classicism: from the Grand Tour to Revolution & Empire  

By week 4, we will be equipped to focus on the 18th century,  starting with Grand Tour, British antiquarianism and the way in which Antiquity was used in part as a foil for the emergence of  “distinctly English” style.

 

Our second class this week will undertake the French Revolution’s programmatic uses of references to Greco-Roman antiquity. We will compare and contrast these to Italian and English uses and  consider, in particular, the artistic and political career of David from 1789 and through the Napoleonic Empire. 

         

Week 5 Classicism versus Romanticism?

Our Tuesday class will study the ways in which the early 19th century’s fascination for classical ruins was a mainstay of Middle-European and Anglo-Saxon Romanticism. 

 

On Thursday, we will ask to what extent the early to mid 19th century debates surrounding “drawing versus color” correspond to conceptions and uses of the classical canon and its purported values. 

 

Week 6 : Midterm review and midterm examination

 

Week 7: Avant-garde classicisms

Our first class this week will evaluate the claims made by the nascent avant-gardes in the wake of the 1848 revolutions that the classical tradition has been corrupted by Academic and official art. The reasons why historical painting, allegory and classical iconography are deemed, by some, irrelevant to modern art will be the thrust of this class.

 

Our second class, week 7, will be held at the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna to see some of the 19th century works studied in class, with particular attention to the way in which Italian painting of the 19th takes its cues from other European avant-gardes while attempting to convey privileged access to a classical tradition.

 

 

Week 8

Here we will examine how Cézanne’s treatment of landscape, nature and the human body were conceived and promoted as a salutary return to classical values in the late and post-impressionist decades, from the 1880s to the 1910s.

 

As a complement to this our class on late 19th early 20th century art, and Cézanne, we look at how the European Symbolists, including the Nabis, referenced the classical, and to what socio-political ends.  We will examine how a posited classical tradition was actually essential to the emergence of non-figurative or abstract painting in particular.

Week 9 Problems in the Third dimension

Sculptural case studies of works by Rodin, Maillol and Bourdelle will flesh out the classical-abstract nexus through a simple question that opens up complex answers: how differently did painters and sculptors approach “the classical” circa 1900? 

 

The second and final class week 9 will extend these question to the case of architcetrue and the decorative arts, with particular emphasis on Art Nouveau and Liberty styles.

Week 10 Fauvism and Futurism

Each of these historical avant-gardes will be examined through the works and statements of its most well-known proponents, from Matisse to Balla and Boccioni, from 1906 to the early 1920s.

Tuesday’s class will treat Fauvism; Thursday’s class Futurism.

 

Week 11 What Return to Order?

Addressing the ways that classicism was referenced by artists in Italy, France and Germany  following World War 1, we will consider how artists legitimized avant-garde art and architecture through references — iconographical, stylistic, ideological and textual — to a posited classical past. Our first class will focus on Picasso

 

Our second class will treat Purism, Esprit Nouveau, Valori Plastici, later Futurism and, more generally, the Return to Order and the historical avant-gardes circa 1920 will form the bulk of this class.

Week 12 Classicism as power: European art and the World Wars

These two classes will consider how ideas and myths about the classical past were appropriated and promulgated by political regimes, from Soviet Russia to Germany, Italy, France, Great Britain and the United States from the 1920s to the late 1940s.

 

Week 13 The Legacy of Classicism

In this class, we will ask what was left of classicism’s legitimacy for European and North American artists and architects in the aftermath of the war and until the Return to figuration in painting in the 1980s. 

 

class will focus in particular on the painting of Philip Guston, the question of popular and high culture, for which the classical has become short-hand. 

 

Week 14 Contemporary classicism

Our Tuesday class will explore case-studies in Italian cinema from the 1960s and 1970s to contrast, in part, with American and French uses of “the classical” in the same period.

 

Thursday’s class will consider how artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are influenced by or make reference to ‘Classicism’; how classicism has been subverted in media or subject; and how myth and iconography have been reworked, from Twombly to the emerging artists in today’s globalized artworld.

 

Week 15         Final Exam

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Specialized courses offered periodically on specific aspects of concern in the field of Art History. Courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern.
May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

You will be able to:

·         Gain an understanding of critical approaches to classicism and culture

 

·         Explore the legacies of the visual culture of intimately linked esthetic and political debates

 

·         Develop advanced skills in the analysis of art, from painting and sculpture to film, architecture and the decorative arts

 

·         Engage critically with theoretical and historical texts and deploy these in the analysis of visual examples

 

·         Analyze the visual culture of these period in its historical and political context

 

·         Structure and write an essay using visual analysis and cited research as evidence


TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
 ASSESSMENT METHODS: Assignment - Guidelines - Weight Preparation and Participation in class discussions This course meets only once per week and is largely on site; therefore, attendance is essential. The lectures are not composed simply of a tour of monuments, but will involve complex analysis at the sites themselves. In order to grasp the concepts presented in course readings and hand-outs, participation is essential. Students will be evaluated on their attention to lectures by questions asked and ideas discussed. Engagement with in-class assignments will also be evaluated. 20% One written response to one of the required readings to serve as introduction to the discussion of that week’s readings; the written response may be posted for student comments at least 24 hours or handed in to the professor at the beginning of that class. The response demonstrates the student’s ability to briefly summarize, problematize and open up the chosen reading to larger discussion. 10% Mid-term The midterm examination will be composed of: •Short answer questions: Definitions of terms, specific questions regarding artworks we have observed or issues discussed in the assigned readings •Slide comparisons: identify 2 works, their makers and dates, then compare and contrast the works in a short essay, supporting your discussion with relevant information from assigned readings and lectures •Essay: topics that treat general themes discussed in the first half of the course. You will need to provide specific examples taken from works discussed in class. 25% Term Paper You will produce a term paper of on a specific artwork pertinent to the class topic. The paper will be based on a combination of research and direct observation, drawing on the visual and critical skills developed in class. A list of suggested topics will be provided, though students may suggest their own topics, to be approved by the professor. Please refer to the course outline below for deadlines. 20% Final Exam The format for the final exam will be the same as the midterm, with slide identifications and comparisons covering only material since the midterm. The essay questions will be on topics taken from themes discussed in the entire course. 25% -ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: A Work of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course. B This is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments. C This is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings. D This level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail. F This work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant. -ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS: ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until Friday, December 14th, 2018. ACADEMIC HONESTY As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision. STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy. 

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

 

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

 

AH 299A Special Topics in Art History: 

Classicism: from Renaissance to Contemporary Art

Spring 2019

 

Instructor: Dr. Sarah Linford

[email protected]

3924877920

 

Hours/place: TTH 11:30-12:45 PM  

(note that Friday, February 22nd is Makeup day for Thursday, April 25)

 

TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45 

CREDITS: 3 

PREREQUISITES: none

 

OFFICE HOURS:

Thursday 1:45-2pm by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Specialized course offered periodically on specific aspects of art history. “Special Topics in Art History courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

 

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT: 

The “classical tradition,” or classicism, derived from the art of the ancient Greco-Roman world, is a privileged vantage point from which to view the history of art until the historical avant-gardes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and to this day. This course examines the birth, meanings, and varied significance of the "classical" as attributed to ancient art; its purported rediscovery and reworking in the Renaissance. It then turns to the “neo-Classicism” of the 18th century, including what this return meant in socio-political terms and how variegated were its forms throughout Europe and the United States. Modern art's alternate historicism and disavowal of the subjects, values and institutions associated with classicism and, finally, how it has resurfaced, often ironically, in contemporary practices conclude this course. For in fact, far from disappearing, classicism continues to have a powerful impact, remaining present not only in the fine arts but also in cinema, photography, design and architecture. Students will acquire a clear sense of what classicism has been made to stand for, how it has been repurposed and how, in its many forms, it has pervaded the history and ideology of culture and the traditions of the West, from Antiquity to today.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

You will be able to:

 

·         Develop a nuanced understanding of ***knowledge of the visual culture of

·         Gain an understanding of critical approaches to classicism and culture

 

·         Explore the legacies of the visual culture of t and debates

 

·         Develop advanced skills in the analysis of art, from painting and sculpture to film, architecture and the decorative arts

 

·         Engage critically with theoretical and historical texts and deploy these in the analysis of visual examples

 

·         Analyze the visual culture of these period in its historical and political context

 

·         Structure and write an essay using visual analysis and cited research as evidence

 

 

GRADING POLICY 

 

-ASSESSMENT METHODS: 

 

Assignment - Guidelines - Weight

Preparation and Participation in class discussions This course meets only once per week and is largely on site; therefore, attendance is essential. The lectures are not composed simply of a tour of monuments, but will involve complex analysis at the sites themselves. In order to grasp the concepts presented in course readings and hand-outs, participation is essential. Students will be evaluated on their attention to lectures by questions asked and ideas discussed. Engagement with in-class assignments will also be evaluated. 20%

 

One written response to one of the required readings to serve as introduction to the discussion of that week’s readings; the written response may be posted for student comments at least 24 hours or handed in to the professor at the beginning of that class. The response demonstrates the student’s ability to briefly summarize, problematize and open up the chosen reading to larger discussion.    10%

 

Mid-term The midterm examination will be composed of:

•Short answer questions: Definitions of terms, specific questions regarding artworks we have observed or issues discussed in the assigned readings

•Slide comparisons: identify 2 works, their makers and dates, then compare and contrast the works in a short essay, supporting your discussion with relevant information from assigned readings and lectures 

•Essay: topics that treat general themes discussed in the first half of the course. You will need to provide specific examples taken from works discussed in class. 25%

 

Term Paper You will produce a term paper of on a specific artwork pertinent to the class topic. The paper will be based on a combination of research and direct observation, drawing on the visual and critical skills developed in class. A list of suggested topics will be provided, though students may suggest their own topics, to be approved by the professor. Please refer to the course outline below for deadlines. 20%

 

Final Exam The format for the final exam will be the same as the midterm, with slide identifications and comparisons covering only material since the midterm. The essay questions will be on topics taken from themes discussed in the entire course. 25%

 

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: 

A Work of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.

B This is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.

C This is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.

D This level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.

F This work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

 

 

 

 

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS: 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY 

You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until Friday, December 14th, 2018.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY 

As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.

 

STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES

John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

 

CLASS HOURS

 

TTH 11:30-12:45 PM

(Note: Make-up class scheduled on Friday, February 22nd to make-up for the holiday on Thursday, April 25th)

 

SCHEDULE:

Course outline and assignments.

 

Week 1           Introductory lecture

Course content and logistics.

 

            

Rediscovering the classical

Our second class will explore the key concepts and figures that defined Renaissance understanding of ancient Greek and Roman art. We will address competition between major artistic figures, the influence of the classical on artistic status and styles, and the contribution of these to the particular dynamism of Renaissance art and architecture. We will detail the major innovations and characteristics of the Renaissance in Italy, then focus on specific paintings and sculptures by artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Titian and Raphael.

 

 

                              

 

Week 2 On iconographical uses and re-uses of the classical

Our Tuesday class will take a more thematic approach, probing through a particular case-study how the iconography of the classical past was integrated in variegated ways in 15th and 16th-century art.  This case-study will lead us to consider the issues of artistic narrative, the role of patrons, the spectator and the context of viewing art in the Early Modern period — and the role played in these of referencing Antiquity.

 

Our second class, week 2, will be an on-site visit of some of the Renaissance works discussed.

 

Week 3 An international style?

We will begin week 3 by considering how classicism migrated, was established and integrated into French art through cross-cultural influence in the 16th and 17th centuries. Students will consider how “the classical” entered French art and the Schools of Fontainebleau. This class will then address the founding of the French Academy and the work of Poussin, focusing on the language and rhetoric of classicism in 17th century France. 

 

Our second class, week 3, will compare French and Italian neoclassicisms with the reception and uses of Antiquity in Germany and Great Britain.

 

Week 4 18th-century classicism: from the Grand Tour to Revolution & Empire  

By week 4, we will be equipped to focus on the 18th century,  starting with Grand Tour, British antiquarianism and the way in which Antiquity was used in part as a foil for the emergence of  “distinctly English” style.

 

Our second class this week will undertake the French Revolution’s programmatic uses of references to Greco-Roman antiquity. We will compare and contrast these to Italian and English uses and  consider, in particular, the artistic and political career of David from 1789 and through the Napoleonic Empire. 

         

Week 5 Classicism versus Romanticism?

Our Tuesday class will study the ways in which the early 19th century’s fascination for classical ruins was a mainstay of Middle-European and Anglo-Saxon Romanticism. 

 

On Thursday, we will ask to what extent the early to mid 19th century debates surrounding “drawing versus color” correspond to conceptions and uses of the classical canon and its purported values. 

 

Week 6 : Midterm review and midterm examination

 

Week 7: Avant-garde classicisms

Our first class this week will evaluate the claims made by the nascent avant-gardes in the wake of the 1848 revolutions that the classical tradition has been corrupted by Academic and official art. The reasons why historical painting, allegory and classical iconography are deemed, by some, irrelevant to modern art will be the thrust of this class.

 

Our second class, week 7, will be held at the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna to see some of the 19th century works studied in class, with particular attention to the way in which Italian painting of the 19th takes its cues from other European avant-gardes while attempting to convey privileged access to a classical tradition.

 

 

Week 8

Here we will examine how Cézanne’s treatment of landscape, nature and the human body were conceived and promoted as a salutary return to classical values in the late and post-impressionist decades, from the 1880s to the 1910s.

 

As a complement to this our class on late 19th early 20th century art, and Cézanne, we look at how the European Symbolists, including the Nabis, referenced the classical, and to what socio-political ends.  We will examine how a posited classical tradition was actually essential to the emergence of non-figurative or abstract painting in particular.

Week 9 Problems in the Third dimension

Sculptural case studies of works by Rodin, Maillol and Bourdelle will flesh out the classical-abstract nexus through a simple question that opens up complex answers: how differently did painters and sculptors approach “the classical” circa 1900? 

 

The second and final class week 9 will extend these question to the case of architcetrue and the decorative arts, with particular emphasis on Art Nouveau and Liberty styles.

Week 10 Fauvism and Futurism

Each of these historical avant-gardes will be examined through the works and statements of its most well-known proponents, from Matisse to Balla and Boccioni, from 1906 to the early 1920s.

Tuesday’s class will treat Fauvism; Thursday’s class Futurism.

 

Week 11 What Return to Order?

Addressing the ways that classicism was referenced by artists in Italy, France and Germany  following World War 1, we will consider how artists legitimized avant-garde art and architecture through references — iconographical, stylistic, ideological and textual — to a posited classical past. Our first class will focus on Picasso

 

Our second class will treat Purism, Esprit Nouveau, Valori Plastici, later Futurism and, more generally, the Return to Order and the historical avant-gardes circa 1920 will form the bulk of this class.

Week 12 Classicism as power: European art and the World Wars

These two classes will consider how ideas and myths about the classical past were appropriated and promulgated by political regimes, from Soviet Russia to Germany, Italy, France, Great Britain and the United States from the 1920s to the late 1940s.

 

Week 13 The Legacy of Classicism

In this class, we will ask what was left of classicism’s legitimacy for European and North American artists and architects in the aftermath of the war and until the Return to figuration in painting in the 1980s. 

 

class will focus in particular on the painting of Philip Guston, the question of popular and high culture, for which the classical has become short-hand. 

 

Week 14 Contemporary classicism

Our Tuesday class will explore case-studies in Italian cinema from the 1960s and 1970s to contrast, in part, with American and French uses of “the classical” in the same period.

 

Thursday’s class will consider how artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are influenced by or make reference to ‘Classicism’; how classicism has been subverted in media or subject; and how myth and iconography have been reworked, from Twombly to the emerging artists in today’s globalized artworld.

 

Week 15         Final Exam

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

 

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

 

AH 299A Special Topics in Art History: 

Classicism: from Renaissance to Contemporary Art

Spring 2019

 

Instructor: Dr. Sarah Linford

[email protected]

3924877920

 

Hours/place: TTH 11:30-12:45 PM  

(note that Friday, February 22nd is Makeup day for Thursday, April 25)

 

TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45 

CREDITS: 3 

PREREQUISITES: none

 

OFFICE HOURS:

Thursday 1:45-2pm by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Specialized course offered periodically on specific aspects of art history. “Special Topics in Art History courses are normally research-led topics on an area of current academic concern. May be taken more than once for credit with different topics.

 

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT: 

The “classical tradition,” or classicism, derived from the art of the ancient Greco-Roman world, is a privileged vantage point from which to view the history of art until the historical avant-gardes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and to this day. This course examines the birth, meanings, and varied significance of the "classical" as attributed to ancient art; its purported rediscovery and reworking in the Renaissance. It then turns to the “neo-Classicism” of the 18th century, including what this return meant in socio-political terms and how variegated were its forms throughout Europe and the United States. Modern art's alternate historicism and disavowal of the subjects, values and institutions associated with classicism and, finally, how it has resurfaced, often ironically, in contemporary practices conclude this course. For in fact, far from disappearing, classicism continues to have a powerful impact, remaining present not only in the fine arts but also in cinema, photography, design and architecture. Students will acquire a clear sense of what classicism has been made to stand for, how it has been repurposed and how, in its many forms, it has pervaded the history and ideology of culture and the traditions of the West, from Antiquity to today.

 

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

You will be able to:

 

·         Explore the legacies of the visual culture of and key intellectual and political debates

 

·         Develop advanced skills in the analysis of art, from painting and sculpture to film, architecture and the decorative arts

 

·         Engage critically with theoretical and historical texts and deploy these in the analysis of visual examples

 

·         Analyze the visual culture of these period in its historical and political context

 

·         Structure and write an essay using visual analysis and cited research as evidence

 

 

GRADING POLICY 

 

-ASSESSMENT METHODS: 

 

Assignment - Guidelines - Weight

Preparation and Participation in class discussions This course meets only once per week and is largely on site; therefore, attendance is essential. The lectures are not composed simply of a tour of monuments, but will involve complex analysis at the sites themselves. In order to grasp the concepts presented in course readings and hand-outs, participation is essential. Students will be evaluated on their attention to lectures by questions asked and ideas discussed. Engagement with in-class assignments will also be evaluated. 20%

 

One written response to one of the required readings to serve as introduction to the discussion of that week’s readings; the written response may be posted for student comments at least 24 hours or handed in to the professor at the beginning of that class. The response demonstrates the student’s ability to briefly summarize, problematize and open up the chosen reading to larger discussion.    10%

 

Mid-term The midterm examination will be composed of:

•Short answer questions: Definitions of terms, specific questions regarding artworks we have observed or issues discussed in the assigned readings

•Slide comparisons: identify 2 works, their makers and dates, then compare and contrast the works in a short essay, supporting your discussion with relevant information from assigned readings and lectures 

•Essay: topics that treat general themes discussed in the first half of the course. You will need to provide specific examples taken from works discussed in class. 25%

 

Term Paper You will produce a term paper of on a specific artwork pertinent to the class topic. The paper will be based on a combination of research and direct observation, drawing on the visual and critical skills developed in class. A list of suggested topics will be provided, though students may suggest their own topics, to be approved by the professor. Please refer to the course outline below for deadlines. 20%

 

Final Exam The format for the final exam will be the same as the midterm, with slide identifications and comparisons covering only material since the midterm. The essay questions will be on topics taken from themes discussed in the entire course. 25%

 

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: 

A Work of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.

B This is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluate theory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture and reference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.

C This is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.

D This level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.

F This work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

 

 

 

 

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS: 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY 

You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until Friday, December 14th, 2018.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY 

As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.

 

STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES

John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

 

CLASS HOURS: 

 

TTH 11:30-12:45 PM

(Note: Make-up class scheduled on Friday, February 22nd to make-up for the holiday on Thursday, April 25th)

 

SCHEDULE:

Course outline and assignments.

 

Week 1           Introductory lecture

Course content and logistics.

 

            

Rediscovering the classical

Our second class will explore the key concepts and figures that defined Renaissance understanding of ancient Greek and Roman art. We will address competition between major artistic figures, the influence of the classical on artistic status and styles, and the contribution of these to the particular dynamism of Renaissance art and architecture. We will detail the major innovations and characteristics of the Renaissance in Italy, then focus on specific paintings and sculptures by artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Titian and Raphael.

 

 

                              

 

Week 2 On iconographical uses and re-uses of the classical

Our Tuesday class will take a more thematic approach, probing through a particular case-study how the iconography of the classical past was integrated in variegated ways in 15th and 16th-century art.  This case-study will lead us to consider the issues of artistic narrative, the role of patrons, the spectator and the context of viewing art in the Early Modern period — and the role played in these of referencing Antiquity.

 

Our second class, week 2, will be an on-site visit of some of the Renaissance works discussed.

 

Week 3 An international style?

We will begin week 3 by considering how classicism migrated, was established and integrated into French art through cross-cultural influence in the 16th and 17th centuries. Students will consider how “the classical” entered French art and the Schools of Fontainebleau. This class will then address the founding of the French Academy and the work of Poussin, focusing on the language and rhetoric of classicism in 17th century France. 

 

Our second class, week 3, will compare French and Italian neoclassicisms with the reception and uses of Antiquity in Germany and Great Britain.

 

Week 4 18th-century classicism: from the Grand Tour to Revolution & Empire  

By week 4, we will be equipped to focus on the 18th century,  starting with Grand Tour, British antiquarianism and the way in which Antiquity was used in part as a foil for the emergence of  “distinctly English” style.

 

Our second class this week will undertake the French Revolution’s programmatic uses of references to Greco-Roman antiquity. We will compare and contrast these to Italian and English uses and  consider, in particular, the artistic and political career of David from 1789 and through the Napoleonic Empire. 

         

Week 5 Classicism versus Romanticism?

Our Tuesday class will study the ways in which the early 19th century’s fascination for classical ruins was a mainstay of Middle-European and Anglo-Saxon Romanticism. 

 

On Thursday, we will ask to what extent the early to mid 19th century debates surrounding “drawing versus color” correspond to conceptions and uses of the classical canon and its purported values. 

 

Week 6 : Midterm review and midterm examination

 

Week 7: Avant-garde classicisms

Our first class this week will evaluate the claims made by the nascent avant-gardes in the wake of the 1848 revolutions that the classical tradition has been corrupted by Academic and official art. The reasons why historical painting, allegory and classical iconography are deemed, by some, irrelevant to modern art will be the thrust of this class.

 

Our second class, week 7, will be held at the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna to see some of the 19th century works studied in class, with particular attention to the way in which Italian painting of the 19th takes its cues from other European avant-gardes while attempting to convey privileged access to a classical tradition.

 

 

Week 8

Here we will examine how Cézanne’s treatment of landscape, nature and the human body were conceived and promoted as a salutary return to classical values in the late and post-impressionist decades, from the 1880s to the 1910s.

 

As a complement to this our class on late 19th early 20th century art, and Cézanne, we look at how the European Symbolists, including the Nabis, referenced the classical, and to what socio-political ends.  We will examine how a posited classical tradition was actually essential to the emergence of non-figurative or abstract painting in particular.

Week 9 Problems in the Third dimension

Sculptural case studies of works by Rodin, Maillol and Bourdelle will flesh out the classical-abstract nexus through a simple question that opens up complex answers: how differently did painters and sculptors approach “the classical” circa 1900? 

 

The second and final class week 9 will extend these question to the case of architcetrue and the decorative arts, with particular emphasis on Art Nouveau and Liberty styles.

Week 10 Fauvism and Futurism

Each of these historical avant-gardes will be examined through the works and statements of its most well-known proponents, from Matisse to Balla and Boccioni, from 1906 to the early 1920s.

Tuesday’s class will treat Fauvism; Thursday’s class Futurism.

 

Week 11 What Return to Order?

Addressing the ways that classicism was referenced by artists in Italy, France and Germany  following World War 1, we will consider how artists legitimized avant-garde art and architecture through references — iconographical, stylistic, ideological and textual — to a posited classical past. Our first class will focus on Picasso

 

Our second class will treat Purism, Esprit Nouveau, Valori Plastici, later Futurism and, more generally, the Return to Order and the historical avant-gardes circa 1920 will form the bulk of this class.

Week 12 Classicism as power: European art and the World Wars

These two classes will consider how ideas and myths about the classical past were appropriated and promulgated by political regimes, from Soviet Russia to Germany, Italy, France, Great Britain and the United States from the 1920s to the late 1940s.

 

Week 13 The Legacy of Classicism

In this class, we will ask what was left of classicism’s legitimacy for European and North American artists and architects in the aftermath of the war and until the Return to figuration in painting in the 1980s. 

 

class will focus in particular on the painting of Philip Guston, the question of popular and high culture, for which the classical has become short-hand. 

 

Week 14 Contemporary classicism

Our Tuesday class will explore case-studies in Italian cinema from the 1960s and 1970s to contrast, in part, with American and French uses of “the classical” in the same period.

 

Thursday’s class will consider how artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are influenced by or make reference to ‘Classicism’; how classicism has been subverted in media or subject; and how myth and iconography have been reworked, from Twombly to the emerging artists in today’s globalized artworld.

 

Week 15         Final Exam