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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PL 361"
COURSE NAME: "Globalization and Democracy"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2018
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Bridget Welsh
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: PL 209
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
“Globalization” is perhaps the keyword of our time. It signifies a multifaceted development that also has major implications for world politics and democratic nation-states. From a theoretical, normative and empirical perspective, the course examines the complex relationship between globalization and democracy. Does globalization help generate democracy, and if so, under what conditions? What are the causal mechanisms shaping the relationship between globalization and democracy? How can democratic institutions, claims, rules and rights be preserved or renewed in a “partially globalized world” (Robert Keohane)? The course will explore these questions and related controversies by turning to leading contemporary scholars of international relations and international relations theory. Special attention will be paid to institutions and agents of political globalization as well as factors engendering or undermining democratization on the national and global level. 
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

This course is an upper-level course focusing on the relationship between globalization and democracy, broadly conceived. This course will introduce students to the concept of globalization and contemporary debates about globalization and democracy. Each week students are expected to read a leading and contemporary book on how globalization is shaping politics. The issues explored include the role of international institutions and global governance, inequality, threats to democracy, financial crises, trade, the Internet and social media, food scarcity and the environment. Students will enrich their knowledge and skills that will help them in any career and in becoming more empowered and informed citizens. 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

After this course, students should expect to begin thinking, reading, writing and acting as a specialist on globalization!  

Specific Learning Objectives 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

·       Understand a Range of Concepts, Theories and Approaches in Globalization

·        Appreciate the Diversity of Political Perspectives and Outlooks

·       Frame Problems from Multiple Perspectives

·       Construct and Present their Own Interpretations of Political Events 

·       Recognize the Range and Variation in Forms of Political Power  

·       Evaluate Different Approaches to Key Issues

·       Formulate their Own Opinions on Political Issues

·       Research Contemporary Political Issues

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Globalization: A Very Short Introduction, 4th edition.Manfred B. StegerOxford: Oxford University Press, 2017)ISBN-13: 978-0198779551 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Exit WestMohsin Hamid(New York: Penguin Books, 2017) ISBN 978-0-241-97906-8 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Globalization and its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of TrumpJoseph Stiglitz(New York: W.W. Norton, 2018) ISBN: 978-0393355161 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Age of Anger: The History of the Present Prakaj Mishra (London: Picador; 2018) ISBN-13: 978-1250159304 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It. Yasha Mounk (Harvard University Press, 2018) ISBN-13: 978-0674976825 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia Masha Gessen(New York: Riverhead Books, 2017) ISBN: 978-1594634536 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Seventh Edition 7th Edition Charles P. Kindleberger and Robert Z. Aliber (New York: PalgraveMacmillan, 2015). ISBN: 978-1137525758 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Grave New World: The End of Globalization, the Return of History.Stephen D. King. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0300218046 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy. Dani Rodrik(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0691177847 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs.Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker, (New York: Little Brown and Company, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0316343695 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
The People Vs Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it). Jamie Bartlett, (London: Random House, 2018) ISBN-13: 978-1785039065 This book has been ordered at the Almost Corner Bookstore
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class Attendance and ParticipationClass Attendance & Participation (20% of total grade) As an upper level course, students are expected to read all the required reading before class to participate in discussion. Please note that more than THREE absences of any class session will significantly lower a student’s final participation grade. Regular patterns of tardiness will also negatively affect a student’s performance. Class participation will be assessed based on the quality of participation in the class, with higher marks given to students who relate inputs to the course readings and express individual ideas articulately and succinctly. Students are not evaluated on the volume that they say, but the degree to which their participation adds value to the discussion. Students are asked to turn their smart phones and other devices on silent mode and not use them during class time. Laptops are to be used for note-taking, not chatting and emailing during class time. Student distractions that take away from the overall class learning environment are strongly discouraged and will be assessed in class participation performance. 20
Field AssignmentsField Assignments (8% of total grade): Students are asked to conduct TWO interviews in the field to look at different aspects of globalization and democracy and to show how these are related. These field assignments are to be conducted in mid-October.8
Book Reflection CommentariesBook Reflection Commentaries (30% of total grade), These SIX commentaries of 1000 words ask students to respond to the issues, arguments and evidence laid out in the assigned book. There are 12 books in the course that authors can choose for this assignment. For each commentary, students are asked to prepare an analytical commentary (taking a position and developing an argument) on the book, drawing from class discussion. Each review is due by 5pm Friday on the week assigned for the book and must be turned in through email and on Moodle, with a hard copy placed in the class assignment box by the following Monday before noon. Students who turn in more than eight commentaries have the top grades used for their final grade. Students are responsible for finishing these assignments before the 14th week of the course, before December1st. 30
Book Oral PresentationsBook Oral Presentation (12% of the total grade, 6% each presentation). Students are asked to present on TWO of the books during the semester. Students will sign up in the second week of the course and readings will be on a first-signed up basis on the CHOICE program in MOODLE. The presentation should be no more than 10 minutes and can bring in material outside of the book to enrich the discussion. Students may choose to present on one book that they also write a reflection commentary on, but this overlap option is not available for both presentations. Any power point presentation should be forwarded the midnight before. Strict time limits will be imposed. Students will be assessed on their ability to present material clearly and succinctly, the quality of their synopsis as well as their understanding of the reading and comparative case study selected. Students may choose to present on more than two books if there is availability and in this case the top grades will be chosen. 12
Research PaperResearch Paper (30% of total grade, 5% is for the in-class presentation of the paper) Students are asked to submit an original paper of 3,000-3500 words concisely examining one of the issues developed in the course or related to the course theme. The paper must develop an argument and use concrete evidence to support this argument. Students must consult with the professor on the topic via email or in her office hours. Further guidelines on this paper will be provided. The initial paper topic and bibliography is due October 22nd via hard copy and email. The final assignment must be turned in through the assignment protocol noted above by 5pm on the due date, Tuesday, November 20th. No late papers will be accepted. Students are expected to present their paper (no more than 10 minutes) to their classmates the last week of the semester for discussion. 30

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Please note that more than THREE absences of any class session will significantly lower a student’s final participation grade. Regular patterns of tardiness will also negatively affect a student’s performance.  

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE


Protocol for Handing in Written Assignments: Students must turn in all written assignments three ways. This assignment must be 1) emailed to the professor, 2) with a hard copy delivered to the political science assignment basket in front of the Chair’s office on the 2nd floor of the Tiber campus by 5pm on the due date and 3) an electronic copy delivered on through MOODLE to TURNITIN. This will require that you set up your own MOODLE account.


CLASS SESSIONS
 

Class sessions will be held for two and a half hours per week. Each session will combine lectures, discussions, and group activities focused on the assigned topics.   

REQUIRED TEXT AND READINGS

Students will be expected to read all the required reading before class. All the required course reading will be available in the Library on reserve or available on MYJCU.

COURSE TEXTS AND MATERIAL

Students are asked to read the NY Times before each class and regularly during the term. Students are expected to read the following books in this upper level course this semester. Books are available at the Almost Corner Bookstore.

Manfred B. Steger: Globalization: A Very Short Introduction, 4th edition. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0198779551

Mohsin Hamid, Exit West, (New York: Penguin Books, 2017) ISBN 978-0-241-97906-8

Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of Trump, (New York: W.W. Norton, 2018) ISBN: 978-0393355161

Prakaj Mishra, Age of Anger: The History of the Present (London: Picador; 2018) ISBN-13: 978-1250159304

Yasha Mounk, The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It. (Harvard University Press, 2018) ISBN-13: 978-0674976825

Masha Gessen. The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia (New York: Riverhead Books, 2017) ISBN: 978-1594634536

Charles P. Kindleberger and Robert Z. Aliber, Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Seventh Edition 7th Edition (New York: PalgraveMacmillan, 2015). ISBN: 978-1137525758

Dani Rodrik, Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0691177847
           
Stephen D. King. Grave New World: The End of Globalization, the Return of History. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0300218046
           
Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs. (New York: Little Brown and Company, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-0316343695

Jamie Bartlett, The People Vs Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it). (London: Random House, 2018)  ISBN-13: 978-1785039065

Lisa Palmer. Hot, Hungry Planet: The Fight to Stop a Global Food Crisis in the Face of Climate Change. (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017) ISBN-13: 978-1250084200

WEEKLY LESSONS AND READINGS

WEEK 1 (September 2-8) Introducing Globalization   

        Session 1 (September 3) Course Introduction

Students are asked to read the NY Times before each class, including this one.

Session 2 (September 5) Understanding Globalization

Manfred B. Steger: Globalization: A Very Short Introduction, 4th edition. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017) (entire)

Watch: https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story  

WEEK 2 (September 9-15) Introducing Debates on Globalization and Democracy

Session 3 (September 10) Bryan S. Turner and Robert K. Holton (eds). The Routledge International Handbook of Globalization Studies: Second edition (Routledge International Handbooks) 2nd Edition, (London: Routledge, 2016). Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 8

Session 4 (September 12) Bryan S. Turner and Robert K. Holton (eds). The Routledge International Handbook of Globalization Studies: Second edition (Routledge International Handbooks) 2nd Edition, (London: Routledge, 2016). Chapters 14 & 21

 

         Book of the Week: Mohsin Hamid, Exit West, (New York: Penguin Books, 2017)

***Course Dinner Tuesday, September 11th, 7:30pm to discuss course novel above***            

WEEK 3 (September 16-22) Dissecting Anti-Globalization

Book of the Week: Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents Revisited: Anti-Globalization in the Era of Trump, (New York: W.W. Norton, 2018)

WEEK 4 (September 23-29) Dissecting Anti Democracy I

Book of the Week: Prakaj Mishra, Age of Anger: The History of the Present (London: Picador; 2018)

WEEK 5 (September 30-October 6) Dissecting Anti Democracy II

Book of the Week: Yascha Mounk, The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It. (Boston: Harvard University Press, 2018)

WEEK 6 (October 7-13) Looking at Russia

  Book of the Week: Masha Gessen. The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia (New York: Riverhead Books, 2017)

WEEK 7 (October 14-20) Field Assignments

WEEK 8 (October 21-27) Financial Crises

Book of the Week: Charles P. Kindleberger and Robert Z. Aliber, Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Seventh Edition 7th Edition (New York: PalgraveMacmillan, 2015).

WEEK 9 (October 28-November 3) Trade Wars

Book of the Week: Dani Rodrik, Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017)

WEEK 10 (November 4-10) Political Economic Transformations    

Book of the Week: Stephen D. King. Grave New World: The End of Globalization, the Return of History. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017)

WEEK 11 (November 11-17) Global Health

Book of the Week: Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs. (New York: Little Brown and Company, 2017)

WEEK 12 (November 18-24) Internet and Social Media

Book of the Week: Jamie Bartlett, The People Vs Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it). (London: Random House, 2018)

WEEK 13 (November 25-December 1) Food Security and the Climate Change         

Book of the Week: Lisa Palmer. Hot, Hungry Planet: The Fight to Stop a Global Food Crisis in the Face of Climate Change. (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2017)

WEEK 14 (December 2-8) Reflections and Review

***Presentations of Research Paper in Class Sessions ***

WEEK 15 (December 9-15) Finals (No Course Final)