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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "DJRN 199"
COURSE NAME: "Introduction to Photojournalism: On Location in Rome"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session II 2018
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Donald Winslow
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 2:00-5:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS: By appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This is a course in basic photojournalism on location. There will be both classroom sessions and classes off campus, held on location in Rome and the surrounding area, as well as visits to photographic exhibitions. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of photography and photojournalism; how cameras and lenses work; image composition; lighting conditions and techniques; shooting on location; techniques for working as a photographer; editing and producing photographs; and building a portfolio of images. Class sessions will cover learning use of a camera, lights, composition, color, documentary and candid photographic techniques, photographic software such as Adobe Photoshop, and critiques. Classes on location include practical fieldwork.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

This class is designed for beginning and intermediate photojournalism students exploring Rome and the surrounding countryside, concentrating on photojournalistic photography techniques including the “documentary” method and the dynamics of composition through the use of color and natural light. A variety of subjects will be covered, including how to shoot a photographic essay and prepare a portfolio, along with individual and group image critiques and field trips.

Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of photography and photojournalism; how cameras and lenses work; image composition; lighting conditions and techniques; shooting on location; techniques for working as a photographer; professional ethics; editing and producing photographs; building a portfolio of images; participating in individual and group critiques.

Pre-requisite for the course:

Students must provide their own 35mm DSLR digital camera with an adjustable lens or lenses. No film cameras. Camera must include the ability to function on Manual, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, or Program mode. Also required: a camera memory storage card and a spare card (minimum of 2GB); a card reader and/or USB connection for camera to download images to computer; storage device such as a flash or thumb drive (4 to 10GB) or a small external hard drive (20 to 50GB); a laptop computer with photography editing software is recommended. No cellphone cameras or point-and-shoot cameras are allowed.

SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

This is a course in basic photojournalism on location, composed of 12 sessions (each being 3.45 hours long. There will be both classroom sessions and classes off campus, held on location in Rome and the surrounding area. Class sessions will cover learning use of a camera, lights, composition, color, documentary and candid photographic techniques, photographic software such as Adobe Photoshop, and critiques. Classes on location include practical fieldwork where students will apply what they’ve learned in the classroom, shooting individually and as a group on specific assignments and topics including people, portraits, photographic essays, travel, fashion, architecture, food, landscape, nature, and other subjects.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course students will have an awareness of the methods and techniques of practicing photojournalism on location, camera and lens and lighting techniques, documentary and candid photography, professional photojournalism ethics and standards, image editing, photographic production, and a portfolio of 12 to 16 images. 
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Photojournalism: The Professionals’ ApproachKenneth Kobré (Seventh Edition, 2017)Paperback. RoutledgeISBN-10 1138101362, ISBN-13 978-1138101364 There will be required reading assignments from the book, assigned reading from class hand-outs, and assigned reading from online assignments.
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Photographic assignments & semester photography project  50%
Mid-term exam  20%
Final exam 20%
Class participation  10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance is mandatory, there are no excused absences.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week #1: The camera and lenses and the language of photography; An understanding of photography versus photojournalism; Light, shadow, the exposure, composition. Critique and analysis of exemplary photographs and photographic projects from history; Photography software (Adobe Photoshop); On location fieldwork.

Week #2: Refined composition and camera techniques; Depth of field and image control; Candid shooting techniques; Color versus black-and-white photography; Photographing people, places, and things; Finding and understanding natural light; Photography software advanced skills; Mid-term exam on Wednesday during class; On location fieldwork.

Week #3: Planning and launching a semester photographic project, theme choice; Portraits (formal, candid, environmental); Artificial light; Controlling light; Picture series versus photographic essay; Field work on individual assignments and semester project.

Week #4: Fieldwork on semester project; Visiting a photographic exhibit (To be determined); Analysis of how photojournalism is used in print and multimedia today versus historical use; Examination of the work of todays leading photojournalists, with a brief written assignment that relates to their work; Analysis of the students’ progress on their final semester project.

Week #5: Final fieldwork on semester project and assembly and presentation of their work; Critique and analysis by instructor and fellow classmates; Organizing and archiving students’ photographs; Creating CD-ROM of students’ photographs to be left with the University; Final exam.