JCU Logo

JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "BUS 330-2"
COURSE NAME: "International Business "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2018
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Colin Biggs
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 11:30 AM 12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: Junior Standing, EC 202; Recommended: MKT 301
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The objective of this course is to expose students to the essential elements of international business, with particular emphasis on how it differs from domestic business. An extensive use of case studies provides a basis for class discussion, allowing students to develop their analytical skills and apply their theoretical knowledge.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The course studies the system of international trade and investment (international business) by analysing the theories, government policies, financial techniques, logistics, operational practices and corporate decision making which generate and promote international economic involvement.


LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course students will be able to:

-  apply their acquired skills in research, planning, presentation and decision making to specific international business situations 

-  recognise danger and opportunity signals in foreign markets

-  discuss theoretical and practical concepts underlying international business

-  demonstrate a core sensitivity for foreign cultures.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
International Business Strategy (Second Edition)Alain VerbekeCUP978-1107683099  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
ParticipationRequires regular attendance and active participation10%
First case studyShort case for analysis10%
Second case studyShort case study for analysis10%
Third case studyMore complex/ longer case study for analysis20%
Group assignmentSmall group complex/ longer case analysis20%
Final examCase-based formal, written exam30%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the co
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
This is a highly participative course, and attendance is to be considered the norm.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week

Topic

Reading *

Principal activities

1

Introduction to international business, and contrast with international management.  A unifying framework for international business strategy - seven key concepts

Verbeke, Introduction & Chapter 1

Immediate engagement with course themes through lively discussion in pairs and groups drawing in part on international diversity of students in class

Case study on Honda

2

Firm specific advantages (FSAs) – how critical they can be

First short assessment

Chapter 2

Individual and group work on case studies: 3M and IKEA

3

Home country location advantages: their nature

Chapter 3

Case study on Shiseido (perfume)

4

Home country location advantages: the problem of ‘distance’

Second short assessment

Chapter 4

Case studies on Starbucks and Wal-Mart

5

Combining FSAs and location advantages in a multinational network

Chapter 5

Case studies on Nestlé and Tata

6

International innovation: R&D decentralisation, benefits and conflicts

Chapter 6

Case studies on Siemens and Sony

7

International sourcing and production: strengths and weaknesses

Chapter 7

Case studies on Flextronics and BMW

8

International finance: managing risk and market imperfections

Chapter 8

Case studies of Avon and Porsche

9

International marketing, including use of internet, and potential and constraints of global account management

Chapter 9

Case studies of Anheuser Busch and Haier (China)

10

Management issues in multinational enterprises

Chapter 10

Case on LVMH

11

Entry mode dynamics of global strategy (I): foreign distributors; strategic alliance partners

Fourth assessment

Chapter 11 & 12

Cases on Dell and Danone

12

Entry mode dynamics of global strategy (II): mergers and acquisitions

Chapter 13

Case studies on CEMEX, and Lenovo

13

Emerging economies: their role in international business, I

Chapter 14

Cases on AIG, and Google

14

Emerging economies: their role in international business, II

Chapter 15

Case studies on Chinese energy, and on Infosys

* All readings given here are from the course textbook by Alain Verbeke, which is excellent.  Additional readings will be provided directly by the instructor during the course.