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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "GRK 101"
COURSE NAME: "Elementary Greek I "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2018
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Danica Pusic
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 11:30-12:45PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is a first introduction to the study of the Ancient Greek language. It is designed to equip the student with the basics (grammar, vocabulary, syntax) of Ancient Greek in its most widely known form, that of the dialect of classical Athens. The aim of this course is to give a thorough introduction and preparation for reading original texts written by Homer Aesop, Menander, Xenophon Plato, Biblical Greek and other works from Hellenistic and later Greek. No knowledge of Greek is assumed.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The textbook we will use provides comprehensive treatment of the Ancient Greek noun and verb and thorough lessons in the rules of grammar and syntax. During the classes students will learn the basics of the language and will immediately practice new morphology and syntax with familiar words: drills and hand-outs will guarantee a step-by-step, noticeable progress.

There will be many exercises in reading and comprehension of simple and moderate passages. During each lesson new words and inflections will be introduced; those should be memorized. All the declensions and many of verb features will be thoroughly explained and used in translations of passages by Menander (comedy), Plutarch (historiography), Aesop (fables), Xenophon (historiography), from Greek to English.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

This course is designed to provide the students with the elements of the structure of Ancient Greek and with the knowledge of its basic vocabulary in preparation for reading texts in the original language. By the end of this course, students who successfully complete it will be able to:

  • Pronounce Ancient Greek correctly and read simple sentences aloud.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic Greek vocabulary, grammar, morphology and syntax.
  • Read and translate simple sentences, narratives, and dialogues in adapted or annotated Greek texts.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Greek: An intensive courseH. Hansen, G. M. QuinnFordham University Press978-0823216635  
Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek - Book 1M. Balme, G. LawallOxford University Press978-0195149562  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Preparation and in-class review of exercises, participation and attendance 20%
Frequent quizzes 30%
Midterm exam 25%
Final exam 25%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Each absence should be adequately justified and the professor should be informed about it by e-mail, possibly prior to the class. Students with more than three absences will get extra assignments; these shall be graded. 
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Week

Class Contents

Reference

(Hansen & Quinn, 1992)
(Balme & Lawall, 2003)

1

Organization of the course.

The Greek alphabet; pronunciation.

Accents, breathings, elision; punctuation.

H&Q: Introduction: 1-12;Unit 4: 42

B&L: Introduction: IX-XIX

2

Nouns: gender, number and cases.

First declension (feminine nouns).

Second declension (masculine, feminine and neuter).

H&Q: Unit 1: 13-15;

Unit 4: 37, 1

B&L:
 Unit 1: 1, 2, 3

3

First declension (masculine nouns).

The article.

Verbs: person and number; tense and aspect;

mood and voice.

Review.

H&Q: Unit 4: 37, 2;

Unit 1: 16;

Unit 2: 18, 19

B&L: 
Unit 1: text; 4. Unit 2: 4,5. Unit 4, 8

4

Present indicative active of -ω verbs and of εἰμί.

Word order.

H&Q: Unit 2: 20;

Unit 1: 17

B&L: Unit 2: 1; text

5

Imperfect indicative active.

Agreement of subject and verb.

Unit 2: 21, 24

6

Future indicative active.

Aorist indicative active.

Prepositions.

Unit 2 :22, 23

7

Adjectives of the first and second declensions.

Perfect indicative active.

Pluperfect indicative active.

Unit 4: 38, 39;

Unit 3: 28, 29

8

Review and Midterm exam.

9

Particles and connectors; negation.

Present imperative; infinitives.

Readings: selections from Plutarch and Menander.

H&Q: Unit 2&4: vocabulary notes;

Unit 11: 89, 1;

Unit 2: 26;

Unit 3: 30

B&L: 
Unit 2: 2, 3; Unit 3: 1

10

Third declension;

Reading: selections from Aesop and Xenophon.

H&Q;  Unit 6: 48

B&L
: Unit 7, 3

11

Third declension: stems in –τ, -δ, -θ, -ν, -ντ.

Present imperative active and present infinitive active of εἰμί.

Reading: selection from Lucian.

H&Q: Unit 6: 48;

Unit 15: 115

B&L:
Unit 7, 5

12

Review.

Third declension: stems in –ρ, -λσ; vocalic stems.

Overview and drill of third declension.

H&Q: Unit 10: 82, 83

B&L:
Unit 7, 6

13

Overview of third declension and drills.

Reading: selections of various authors.

14

General review.

15

Final exam.