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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 223"
COURSE NAME: "American Literature "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2018
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Silvia Ammary
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 3:00-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This is a reading and writing intensive course. Students in 200-level literature classes are required to produce 4-5,000 words of critical writing.
The course deals with a chronological historical coverage of the development of American literature from the 17th century until modern times. Attention is given to the major historical, philosophical and literary movements that shaped American literature such as Puritanism, Transcendentalism, and American realism. Major canon American writers will be studied and analyzed.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
The course aims at giving students a thorough knowledge of the important historical movements and literary ones that were part of the American culture. They will also be required to conduct a research paper and a presentation about an American author.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

1. Students will be familiar with the major writers and periods of American culture and history.

2. Students will be able to write a research paper about important authors and their literary contribution by using MLA citation system.

3. Students will be able to conduct research and present that research to their classmates through presentation and debates.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
the norton anthonlogy of american literature nina bayumNorton9780393918854  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Research paper 15%
Presentation  15%
Responses to authors and readings 10
Mid-term 20
Final 40%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
No more than 5 absences are accepted
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

The course is comprised of 14 units or umbrellas designed to be taught during the semesters. These units each address a different time period of American literary history.

 

Week 1: Exploration and Settlement.

  • Introduction to course and class policy.

  • Introduction

  1. Christopher Columbus:

 from Letter to Luis de Santangel Regarding the First Voyage

      from Letter to Ferninand and Isabella Regarding the Fourth Voyage (July 7, 1503),

 

  1. Alvar Nunez Cabeza De Vaca:

The Relation of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca

Dedication

The Malhado Way of Life

Our Life among the Avareres and Arbados

Customs of that Region

The First Confrontation

The Falling out with our Countrymen

 

Week 2&3: Making a New World.

  1. John Smith:

 From A Description of New England

  1. William Bradford:

 Of Plymouth Plantation p.58

  Book І, Chapter IX and X

 

        Book ІІ, Chapter XI, XIX, XX11.

                        

Week 4: The Puritan World View.

  1. Anne Bradstreet:

                To My Dear and Loving Husband

    Here Follows Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House

    The Author to Her Book

     

            Enlightenment Ideals, Introduction to American Literature 1700-1820

  1. Jonathan Edwards:

 Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

 

Week 5&6: American Renaissance/ Enlightenment

  1. Benjamin Franklin:

 From The Autobiography (Part 1 and 2)

  1. Thomas Jefferson:

 From The Declaration of Independence

 

Week 7: Early 19th Century

Introduction

  1. Washington Irving:

 Rip Van Winkle

   10. Edgar Allan Poe:

Annabel Lee

The Fall of the House of Usher

The Philosophy of Composition

 

Week 8&9: Transcendentalism: Preachers in the Garden.

11. Ralph Emerson:

 The American Scholar

Self-Reliance

12. Henry Thoreau:

From Walden

Economy

Where I lived and What I lived For

 

Week 10: Narratives of Interpretation

13. Nathanial Hawthorne:

 Young Goodman Brown

14.  Herman Melville:

 Bartleby, the Scrivener

.

Week 11: The Founders of Modern American Poetry: Whitman and Dickinson.

15. Walt Whitman:

Preface to Leaves of Grass

Song of Myself

 When I Heard the Learned Astronomer

 

16. Emily Dickinson, poems: 112, 202, 207, 409, 479, 591, 620, 1263, 1773

 

Week 12:  Realism and Naturalism

                 Introduction: American Literature 1865-1914

17. Kate Chopin:

 Desiree’s Baby

18.  Stephen Crane:

 The Open Boat.

Week 13: Modernism

       Introduction: American Literature (1869-1945)

19.  T. S. Eliot:

 The Waste Land

 

Week 14: Postmodernism

Introduction: American Literature since 1945

20. Alice Walker:

 Everyday Use

 

 Review: Things Settled and Unsettled.