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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PL 352"
COURSE NAME: "Politics of South-East Asia"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Bridget Welsh
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 11:30-12:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: Junior Standing
OFFICE HOURS: 2-5pm Mondays or by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Southeast Asia is a region of over 620 million people, with some of the most dynamic economies in the world. This course examines contemporary politics in Southeast Asia, with a focus on events since 1970. The course begins by reviewing the impact of colonialism and historical trajectories on contemporary politics. We then move to focus on the eleven specific countries in the region, tracing key political events, outlining the impact of leaders, reviewing the patterns of political contestation and providing a foundation of the structure of governments. In the final part of the course we focus on specific issues and challenges, including the role of leaders, dynamics within political institutions, development, civil society, conflict and human rights, ASEAN, foreign policy and regional security. This course provides a valuable foundation for understanding Southeast Asia and is recommended for any student interested in learning about the region.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
Students will better understand the factors that shape and comprise the political terrain of Southeast Asia. Students will develop the tools to better understand diversity and contemporary regional events and challenges, as well as learn analytical and problem-solving skills.  Students will deepen their understanding of comparative politics, learning lessons and comparisons for experiences in their own countries. This course is ideal for students interested in honing their ability to interpret complex issues, understand the diverse perspectives of stakeholders and develop tools to address real world challenges.  
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

·         Understand Political Issues in Southeast Asia

·         Appreciate Southeast Asia’s Political Diversity

·         Research Contemporary Southeast Asian Political Issues

·         Frame Problems from Multiple Perspectives

·         Recognize the Range and Breadth of Regional Political Challenges

·         Evaluate Societal and State Political Engagement in Southeast Asia

·         Formulate their Own Views on Southeast Asian Politics

·         Compare Experiences in Southeast Asia with that of their own Countries/Region

 

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Southeast Asia in the New International Era.7th Edition. Robert DayleyBoulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016978-0813350110  
The Garden of Evening Mists. Tan Twan Eng. (New York; Weinstein Books, 2012) 978-1602861800  
Challenging Southeast Asian Development. Jonathan Rigg. (London: Routledge, 2016) 978-0415711586  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Dumb Luck Vu Trong Phong (Translated Peter Zinoman). (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2002)978-0472068043  
The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History.Norman G. Owen (ed.) (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005)978-0824828905  

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Class Attendance and ParticipationStudents are expected to read all the required reading before class to participate in discussion. Please note that more than THREE absences from any class session will significantly lower a student’s final participation grade. Regular patterns of tardiness will also negatively affect a student’s performance. Class participation will be assessed based on the quality of participation in the class, with higher marks given to students who relate inputs to the course readings and express individual ideas articulately and succinctly. Students are not evaluated on the volume that they say, but the degree to which their participation adds value to the discussion. Students are asked to turn their smart phones on silent mode and not use them during class time. Laptops are to be used for note-taking, not chatting and emailing during class time. Student distractions that take away from the overall class learning environment are strongly discouraged and will be assessed in class participation performance. 15%
Book Film ReviewStudents are asked to assess the political issues described in the assigned novel and/or films. Each review should refer to at least two of the three assigned works. There will be a course dinner to discuss the themes in the novel on Tuesday, September 5th. The films will be shown on Monday evening on the 11th and 18th of September, with discussion around these films. Students may borrow the film on their own. Reviews should each be 3-5 double-spaced pages, less than 2,500 words. Reviews should address the political themes in the works and reflect analytical insights of Southeast Asian politics. Assessments will be evaluated based on their originality, analytical depth, knowledge of the issues and links to the course reading and presentation. This assignment must be turned in via the assignment protocol outlined above by 5pm on Thursday, September 21st. 10%
Two Analytical Reports of 25% eachStudents are asked to analyze a specific political issue or challenge in a specific country/locality/problem area in two different succinct reports (8-10 double-spaced pages, 2,500-3,000 words, excluding references). The topics chosen should be made in consultation with the professor. A list of recommended topics will be available on Moodle. Papers will be graded on the substance of the analysis, the research thoroughness, understanding of the problem selected, viability of the evidence presented and the written presentation of the material. This assignment must be turned in via the assignment protocol outlined above by 5pm on Tuesday October 24th and Tuesday November 21st. As part of the preparation of the course students will also have the option to attend a special library session geared toward developing research skills in political science and Southeast Asia. 50%
Final ExaminationStudents will be required to sit for a two-hour final examination at the end of term. This examination will include identifications, multiple choice questions and short answer questions that assess the comprehension of the course reading and class discussions. The test will include both objective and subjective questions that test knowledge and the ability to formulate analytical responses.30%
Honors StudentsHONORS COURSE OPTION Students taking the PL352H option have different requirements reflecting honors level courses. Along with the assignments noted, honors students are expected to read all the recommended reading and write a reflection piece based on the entire reading for the course. This reflection piece asks students to identify key themes and lessons learned from the readings on Southeast Asian politics. Honors students are expected to meet with the professor to discuss the readings reflection report. This assignment is due November 30th by 5pm. ASSESSMENT METHODS FOR HONORS STUDENTS Class Attendance/Participation/In-Class Learning: 15% One Book Review Assignment: 5% One Film Review Assignment 5% Two Short Analytical Papers 40% Final Examination: 20% Reading Review 15% Total 100%  

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY 
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Students are allowed three absences per semester, after which any absence for any reason other than serious matters outlined above or with written permission from the Dean's Office will affect the class participation component of the student's final grade. Students are strongly encouraged to attend class. 

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Protocol for Handing in Written Assignments: Students must turn in all major written assignments three ways. This assignment must be 1) emailed to the professor, 2) with a hard copy delivered to the political science assignment box in the Front Office of the Tiber Building by 5pm on the due date and 3) an electronic copy delivered on through MOODLE to TURNITIN. This will require that you set up your own MOODLE account.

WEEKLY LESSON PLANS

Week 1 (August 27-2) Introducing Power in Southeast Asia

Session 1 (August 28): Introducing Southeast Asia
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley, Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 1.

Session 2 (August 30): Understanding Power in Southeast Asia
Required Reading:
Benedict Anderson, “The Idea of Power in Javanese: Its Setting and Development,” in Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia, (Cornell University Press, 1990), pp. 17-77.

Recommended Reading:
Benedict Anderson. The Spectre of Comparison: Nationalism, Southeast Asia and the World. (London and New York: Verso, 1998), Introduction, pp. 1-20.
O.W. Wolters. History, Culture, and Region in Southeast Asian Perspectives. (Ithaca: Cornell University Southeast Asia Program, 1999), pp. 1-33      

Week 2 (September 3-9) Colonial Power and Nationalism

Session 3 (September 4): Colonialism
Required Reading:

Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), Part 1 Skim to get broad themes.
Recommended Reading:
Paul D. Hutchroft. 2000. “Colonial Masters, National Politico, and Provincial Lords: Central Authority and Local Autonomy in the American Philippines, 1900-1913,” Journal of Asian Studies, 59:2, pp. 277-306  

Session 4 (September 6) Nationalism
Required Reading:
Benedict Anderson. “Western Nationalism and Eastern Nationalism: Is there a Difference that Matters?” New Left Review, (May-June 2001), pp. 31-42.
https://newleftreview.org/II/9/benedict-anderson-western-nationalism-and-eastern-nationalism     
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), Part 2 Skim to get broad themes.
Vu Trong Phong (Translated Peter Zinoman). Dumb Luck (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2002), pp. 1-40.
Recommended Reading:

Vu Trong Phong (Translated Peter Zinoman). Dumb Luck (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 2002), Entire.

*** Course Dinner Tan Twan Eng, Garden of Evening Mists, Tues. September 5th, 7:30pm***

Week 3 (September 10-16) Modern Historical Trajectories and Issues

Session 5 (September 11) Paths of Independence
Required Reading:
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), Part 4.
Vincent Houben, “Southeast Asia and Islam,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. (July 2003), pp. 149-170.
Recommended Reading:
Reynaldo C. Ileto. Pasyon and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1840-1910. (Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 1979). Selections.

Session 6 (September 13) Framing Southeast Asian Politics

William Case, “Can the 'Halfway House' Stand?  Semidemocracy and Elite Theory in Three Southeast Asian Countries” Comparative Politics 28 (4) (1996): 437-64.
Jeffrey Winters, “Oligarchs and Oligarchy in Southeast Asia,” in Richard Robison (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Politics, (London: Routledge Press, 2013), pp. 53-68.

***Southeast Asia Film 1 Monday Evening September 11th, Laskar Pelangi ***

Week 4 (September 17-23) Indonesia and Timor Leste

Session 7 (September 18): Indonesia
Required Reading
:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 8
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), pp. 431-447.
Marcus Meitzner, “How Jokowi Won and Democracy Survived,” Journal of Democracy (25/4 October 2014), pp. 111-25.
Recommended Reading:
Larry Diamond. “Indonesia’s Place in Global Democracy,” in Edward Aspinall and Marcus Mietzner (eds.) Problems of Democratisation in Indonesia: Elections, Institutions and Society. (Singapore: ISEAS, 2010), Chapter 2.
Dirk Tomsa, “Indonesia in 2016: Jokowi Consolidates Power,” Southeast Asian Affairs 2017, (Singapore: ISEAS), pp. 149-162.

Session 8 (September 20): Timor Leste
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 9
Dennis Shoesmith, “Timor-Leste in 2016: Redefining Democracy,” Southeast Asian Affairs 2017, (Singapore: ISEAS), pp. 387-404
Recommended Reading:
Geoffrey Robinson. “East Timor Ten Years On: Legacies of Violence,” Journal of Asian Studies. 70 (2011): 1007-1021 

***Southeast Asia Film #2 Monday Evening Sept. 18th: Jagat ***

***Book/Film Review Due Thursday, September 21st by 5pm***

Week 5 (September 24-30) Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore

Session 9 (September 25): Malaysia
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 10
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), pp. 414-430.
Amrita Malhi, “Dr. Mahathir’s Formula,” Inside Story, July 31, 2017
http://insidestory.org.au/dr-mahathirs-formula/
Recommended Reading:
Bridget Welsh, “Malaysia’s Fallen Hero: UMNO’s Weakening Political Legitimacy,” in Bridget Welsh (ed.) The End of UMNO? (Petaling Jaya: SIRD, 2016), pp. 213-242

Session 10 (September 27): Singapore and Brunei
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapters 11 & 12
“The Singapore Exception” Special Report in Economist, July 18, 2015.
http://www.economist.com/sites/default/files/20150718_singapore.pdf
Kenneth Paul Tan and Augustin Boey, “Singapore in 2016: Life after Lee Kuan Yew,” Southeast Asian Affairs 2017, (Singapore: ISEAS), pp. 315-53
Recommended Reading:
Ho Khai Leong. “Political Consolidation in Singapore: Connecting the Party, the Government and the Expanding State,” in Terence Chong (ed.) Managing Success: Singapore Revisited (Singapore: ISEAS, 2010), Chapter 5.
Stephan Ortmann. “Singapore: Authoritarian but Newly Competitive,” Journal of Democracy, October 2011 22/4

Week 6 (October 1-7) Doing Research on Southeast Asia

Session 11 (October 2): Library Research on Southeast Asia In-Class Session

Session 12 (October 4): No Class. Make-up class held earlier class dinner.

Week 7 (October 8-14) Vietnam and Cambodia

Session 13 (October 9): Vietnam
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 4
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), pp. 468-491.
Phuong Nguyen, “Vietnam in 2016: Searching for a New Ethos,” Southeast Asian Affairs 2017, (Singapore: ISEAS), pp. 407-420
Recommended Reading:
Martin Gainsborough, “Vietnam: The Ruling Communist Party and the Incubation of ‘New’ Political Forces,” Richard Robison (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Politics, (London: Routledge Press, 2013), pp. 135-147.
Milton Osborne, The Mekong: Turbulent Past, Uncertain Future, (London: Allen and Unwin, 2000), pp. 20-38.

Session 14 (October 11): Cambodia
Required Reading
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 5
Astrid Noren Nilsson, Cambodia’s Second Kingdom: Nation, Imagination and Democracy (Cornell University Press/ISEAS, 2017), Chapter 1.
Joakam Ojendal and Mona Lilja Beyond Democracy in Cambodia; Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society. (Copenhagen, NIAS Press, 2009), Chapter 10.
Recommended Reading
Duncan McCargo. “Politics by other means? The virtual trials of the Khmer Rouge tribunal” International Affairs 87:3 (2011) 613-627.
Kheang Un. “Cambodia: Moving away from democracy?” International Political Science Review, (2011) 32: 546-562.

Week 8 (October 15-21) Thailand and Laos

Session 15 (October 16): Thailand
Required Reading:

Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapters 2 and 6
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), pp. 448-455 & 492-496
Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, “Populist Challenge to the Establishment: Thaksin Shinawatra and the Transformation of Thai Politics,” Richard Robison (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Politics, (London: Routledge Press, 2013), pp. 83-96.
Claudio Sopranzetti, “The Tightening Authoritarian Grip on Thailand,” Current History, (September 2017), 116/791: 230-34
Recommended Reading:
Anek Laothamatas, “A Tale of Two Democracies: Conflicting Perceptions of Elections and Democracy in Thailand,” in R.H. Taylor, The Politics of Elections in Southeast Asia, (Cambridge: Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Cambridge University Press), pp. 201-223
Kevin Hewison and Kengkij Kitirianglarp. “’Thai-Style Democracy’: The Royalist Struggle for Thailand’s Politics,” in Soren Ivarsson and Lotte Isager (eds.) Saying the Unsayable: Monarchy and Democracy in Thailand (Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2010), pp. 179-202

Session 16 (October 18): Myanmar
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 3
Min Zin, “Burma Votes for Change: The New Configuration of Power,” Journal of Democracy, 27/2 (March 2016), pp. 116-31.
Ardeth M. Thawnghmung and Gwen Robinson, “Myanmar’s New Era: A Break from the Past, ot Too Much of the Same?” in Southeast Asian Affairs 2017, (Singapore: ISEAS), pp. 237-57.

Recommended Reading:
Mary Callahan. 2001. “Burma: Soldiers and State Builders,” in Muthiah Alagappa (ed.) Coercion and Government. The Declining Role of the Military in Asia (Stanford: Stanford University Press), pp. 413-429, 433-442
Thant Myint-U. River of Lost Footsteps: Histories of Burma. (New York: Farrer, Strauss and Giroux, 2006), Chapter 11.

Week 9 (October 22-28) Philippines

Session 17 (October 23): Philippines
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2010), Chapter 8
Norman G. Owen (ed.) The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia: A New History. (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2005), pp. 455-467 & 497-506.
David Timberman, “Elite Democracy Disrupted,” Journal of Democracy (27/4: October 2016), pp. 135-44.
Recommended Reading:
Paul Hutchcroft and Joel Rocamora, “Patronage-based Parties and the Democracy Deficit in the Philippines, in Richard Robison (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Politics, (London: Routledge Press, 2013), pp. 97-119.

***First Analytical Report Due, Tuesday October 24th***

Session 18 (October 25): No Class. Make-up Session held earlier. Class Dinner.

Week 10 (October 29-November 4) Reflections Week

Session 19 (October 30): No Class. Make-up Session held earlier. Class Films.

Session 20: November 1: National Holiday. No Class

Week 11 (November 5-11) Economic Development and Social Policy Challenges

Session 21 (November 6): Economic Development

Required Reading:
Richard F. Doner. “Approaches to the Politics of Economic Growth in Southeast Asia.” Journal of Asian Studies, 50 (4) (1991):818-49.  
Jonathan Rigg. Challenging Southeast Asian Development. (London: Routledge, 2016), Chapters 1 & 2
Recommended Reading:
Jonathan Rigg. Challenging Southeast Asian Development. (London: Routledge, 2016), Chapter 8

Session 22 (November 8): Social Development and Inclusion

Required Reading:
Jonathan Rigg. Challenging Southeast Asian Development. (London: Routledge, 2016), Chapters 3 & 4
Recommended Reading:
Jonathan Rigg. Challenging Southeast Asian Development. (London: Routledge, 2016), Chapter 5

Week 12 (November 12-18) Civil Society, Political Mobilization and Human Rights

Session 23 (November 13): Civil Society and Political Mobilization

Required Reading:
Edward Aspinall and Meredith Weiss, “The limits of civil society: social movements and political parties in Southeast Asia,” in Richard Robison (ed.) Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Politics, (London: Routledge Press, 2013), pp. 213-228.
Kevin Hewison and Garry Rodan. 1996. “The ebb and flow of civil society and the decline of the Left in Southeast Asia,” In Garry Rodan (ed). Political Oppositions in Industrializing Asia. (London and New York: Routledge, 1996)
Recommended Reading:
Michael Peletz. 1983. “Moral and Political Economies in Rural Southeast Asia: A Review Article,” Comparative Studies in Society and History, 25/4: 731-739.  

Session 24 (November 15): Human Rights

Human Rights Watch, License to Kill” Philippine Police Killings in Duterte’s “War on Drugs, March 2, 2017, https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/03/01/license-kill/philippine-police-killings-dutertes-war-drugs
Human Rights Watch, Deepening the Culture of Fear The Criminalization of Peaceful Expression in Malaysia, October 12, 2016.
https://www.hrw.org/report/2016/10/12/deepening-culture-fear/criminalization-peaceful-expression-malaysia

Week 13 (November 19-25) Foreign Policy and ASEAN

Session 25 (November 20): Foreign Policy in Southeast Asia
Required Reading:
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2016), Chapter 12
Amitav Acharya, The Making of Southeast Asia, (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013), Chapters 5-6
Recommended Reading
Amitav Acharya, The Making of Southeast Asia, (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013), Chapter 4

Session 26 (November 22): ASEAN Course Simulation
Required Reading
Robert Dayley. Southeast Asia in the New International Era. (Boulder, Co: Westview Press, 2010), Chapter 8:
Gregory Poling, The South China Sea in Focus. Center for Strategic Studies, July 2013.
https://csis-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/legacy_files/files/publication/130717_Poling_SouthChinaSea_Web.pdf

***Second Analytical Report Due, Tuesday, November 21st***

Week 14 (November 26-December 2) Great Powers, Europe and Southeast Asia

Session 27 (November 28) Great Power Contestation in Southeast Asia
Required Reading:
Donald Emmerson, “President Trumps Asia Inbox,, Freeman Spogli Institute, February 10, 2017
http://aparc.fsi.stanford.edu/news/president-trumps-asia-inbox
Bipul Chatterjee and Saurabh Kumar, “Promises and Pitfalls of the Belt and Road Initiative,” Asia Pacific Bulletin, No. 388. July 2017, 
http://www.eastwestcenter.org/publications/promises-and-pitfalls-the-belt-and-road-initiative

Session 28: (November 29) Southeast Asian Trajectories
Required Reading:
Amitav Acharya, The Making of Southeast Asia, (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013), Chapter 8

Session 29 (December 1) Final Exam Review (Optional).

Week 15 Final Examination TBD

HONORS COURSE OPTION

Students taking the PL352H option have different requirements reflecting honors level courses. Along with the assignments noted, honors students are expected to read all the recommended reading and write a reflection piece based on the entire reading for the course. This reflection piece asks students to identify key themes and lessons learned from the readings on Southeast Asian politics. Honors students are expected to meet with the professor to discuss the readings reflection report. This assignment is due November 30th by 5pm.

Assessment Methods for Honors Students

Class Attendance/Participation/In-Class Learning:     15%
One Book/Film Review Assignment:                             10%    
Two Short Analytical Papers                                       40%
Final Examination:                                                      20%
Reading Review                                                           15%
Total