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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "EN 200-2"
COURSE NAME: "Introduction to Literature "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Alessandra Grego
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 9:00-10:45 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: EN 110 with a grade of C or above
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Presupposing no previous knowledge in particular of literature, the course deals in an intensive manner with a very limited selection of works in the three genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. Students learn the basic literary terms that they need to know to approach literary texts. They are required to do close readings of the assigned texts, use various critical approaches, and write several critical essays on specified readings.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
This course is conceived as a general introduction to literature. Students learn about the basic distinctions between the genres of novel, short story, poetry, drama, and acquire the technical and critical skills require to analyze a selection of representative texts from each genre.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students learn how to distinguish between literary genres, how to read poetry, fiction and drama critically, and how to write a paper of academic quality.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Norton Introduction to LiteratureVarious W. W. Norton & Company; 12th Portable Twelfth ed. edition (13 Jan. 2017)ISBN 13: 978-0393938937 Please order at the Almost Corner Bookshop
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
3 short papersA short close reading or analysis of a chosen text45%
Final exam 25%
Presentation 15%
Class participationSilent attendance does not contribute to this portion of the grade.15%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance is particularly important for summer courses, where much of the work gets done in class. You are expected to come to class with the assigned reading completed and ready to contribute to class discussion. Please avoid coming late and do not walk out of the room during class.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

week

date

session

reading

assignment

1

M

22 May

Introduction to the course: What is literature? Why take this course?

Anthology Introduction,

pp. 1-10

 

 

T

23

May

Fiction: Plot

Hemingway,

Hills Like White Elephants

(p. 122)

 

 

W

24

May

Fiction: Point of View

Kincaid,

Girl

(p. 127)

 

 

T

25

May

Fiction: Character

Foster Wallace,

Good People

(p. 156)

 

2

M

29

May

Fiction: Theme

Cade Bambara,

The Lesson

(p. 279)

 

 

T

30

May

Fiction: Setting, narrator, symbol, style, etc.

 

 

 

W

31

May

 

 

 

 

T

1

June

Presentation

Group 1

Choice of texts by presenting groups

 

F 2 June

 

 

1st Home Paper due

3

M

5

June

Poetry

Anthology pp. 476-501

Aphra Behn, On Her Loving Two Equally (p. 493)

Emily Dickinson,[The Sky is low- the Clouds are mean] (p. 488)

 

 

T

6

June

Poetry: Speaker

Robert Browning, Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister (p. 511)

Langston Hughes, Ballad of the Landlord (p. 519)

 

 

W

7

June

Poetry: Setting and Imagery

John Donne, The Flea (p. 527)

Andrew Marvell, To His Coy Mistress (p. 528)

 

 

 

T

8

June

Poetry: Rhyme and Meter

Matthew Arnold, Dover Beach

(p. 530)

Anthony Hecht, The Dover Bitch

 (p. 539)

 

 

4

M

12

June

Poetry: Rhyme/Meter

William Shakespeare,

Emily Dickinson, W.H. Auden, William Carlos Williams

 

 

T

13

June

Presentations

Group 2

 Choice of texts by presenting groups

 

 

W

14

June

Drama

Elements of Drama- Anthology pp. 800-811

Sophocles, Antigone, p. 1211

 

 

T

15

June

Character, Setting, Action

Viewing Antigone

 

F 16 June

 

 

2nd Home Paper due

5

M

19

June

 

Viewing: Jean Anuilh’s Antigone
or

Edward Albee, A Zoo Story

 

 

T

20

June

 

 

 

 

W

21

June

Presentations

Group 3

Choice of texts by presenting group

 

 

T

22

June

 

Revision of course material

 

 

F

23

June

 

FINAL EXAM