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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "CL/HS 231-1"
COURSE NAME: "History of Ancient Rome and Italy"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Benedetta Bessi
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 10:00-11:15 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy, focusing on the origins and metamorphoses of Rome from its archaic foundations as an Italic-Latinate kingship to an imperial city. The course examines the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Republican period; the political and cultural revolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’; the innovations of the High Empire; and the transition into Late Antiquity. Course materials include the writings of ancient authors in translation (these may include Polybius, Sallust, Cicero, Livy, Augustus, Suetonius, and/or Tacitus) as well as modern historians and archaeologists, along with considerations of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
 This course surveys the history of ancient Rome and Italy. Focus will be on the main lines of the development of Rome from its archaic foundation as an Italic-Latinate kingship down to the age of Constantine. The course will examine the establishment, expansion, and conflicts of the Roman Republic and the political and cultural evolution of the Augustan ‘Principate’ to the rise of the Empire. Readings (in translation) will include the writings of Livy,Cicero, Caesar, Tacitus, Suetonius and other ancient authors, with some consideration of Roman culture, society and religion.
A field trip to a museum/exhibition relavant to the course topic  will be organized in the course of the semester (cost around 10 euros to be paid by the student).
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students will have learned of the methods, means, and justifications by which the Roman city-state expanded into a politically and militarily strong, ethnically diverse and geographically complex empire as well as the reasons for its eventual collapse.

Key Skills Taught: Critical analysis of sources - Clearer writing ability - More lucid oral expression - Greater facility in working independently and in team
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
A Brief History of the RomansM. Boatwright et alii OUP 978-0199987559  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
research paper a formal research paper on a topic of social or cultural history (3000 words, notes and bibliography in Chicago style)25%
midterm exam in class exam with short answers and essay question30%
final exam non cumulative final exam 35%
attendance and class participation 10%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
Attendance is mandatory and it will be taken at the beginning of each session. More than 4 unexcused absences will result in the lowering of the grade (A to A-; A-to B+ etc.).
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 
Mon Aug 28 Introduction of course and course material.
Geographical and historical background.


Wed Aug 30 Italy in the Early Iron Age and the origins of Rome
textbook, ch. 1


WEEK 2
Mon Sept 4 Legendary traditions on the origins of Rome
Livy, selected passages

Wed Sept 6 Rome's First Centuries
textbook, ch. 2


WEEK 3
Mon Sept  11 Rome and Italy in the Fourth Century
textbook, ch. 3

Wed Feb 13  Rome and Carthage


WEEK 4
Mon Sept 18 The Beginnings of a Mediterranean Empire
textbook, ch. 4

Wed Sept  20 Italy and Empire
textbook, ch. 5

Fri  Sept 22 MAKE UP CLASS

Watch DVD

WEEK 5  
Mon Sept 25 Italy Threatened, Enfranchised, Divided
textbook, ch. 6

Wed Sept 27 The domination of Sulla
textbook, ch. 7 (up to p. 124)

WEEK 6
Mon Oct 2 Spartacus' revolt and Catilina's conspiracy
textbook, ch. 7 (from p. 124)


Wed Oct 4 End of the Republic: Caesar's dictatorship
textbook, ch. 8


WEEK 7
Mon Oct 9 Midterm review

Wed Oct 11 Midterm exam

 
WEEK 8
Mon Oct 16 Augustus and the transformation of the Roman world
textbook, ch 9

Wed Oct 18 The Julio Claudian 
textbook, ch. 10


WEEK 9
Mon Oct 23 The Flavians,  
textbook, ch. 11 (up to p. 227)

Wed Oct 25 Research skills workshop

Library material


WEEK 10

Mon Oct 30 Nerva, Trajan
textbook, ch. 11 (up to p. 234)

Wed Nov 1

 

WEEK  11

Mon Nov 6 Hadrian, Antoninus Pius
text book ch. 11 (up to the end) and ch. 12 (up to p. 256) 


Wed Nov 8  Marcus Aurelius, Commodus
textbook ch. 12 (up to p. 256)



WEEK 12
Mon Nov 13 The third century crisis

Textbook ch 12

Wed Nov 15 Chicago style notes and bibliography workshop-Library material

 

 

WEEK 13

Mon Nov 20 Diocletian and the Tetrarchy
textbook, Ch. 13 (up to p. 284)

Wed Nov 22 Constantine and the Advent of Christianity
textbook ch. 13 (from p. 284 to the end) RESEARCH PAPER DUE



WEEK 14

Mon Nov 27 The fall of Roman Western empire and other (his)tories  
Wed Nov 29 Wrap up session