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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PS 337 "
COURSE NAME: "Stereotyping, Prejudice and Discrimination "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Carmen Franzese
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 4:30-5:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: PS 101; Recommended: PS 334 or approval of instructor
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is designed to familiarize students with basic psychological theory and research on intergroup relations, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, so that they can: (1) evaluate and analyze the scientific merit of this research, and (2) apply this research to real world. The goals of this course are to expose students to the core issues, phenomena, and concepts that researchers in this field are attempting to understand and to promote critical thinking about research in this area.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
Central topics will include (but will not be limited to) pejudice (including contemporary forms of prejudice), stereotyping, stigma and discrimination, racism, sexism, and how they can be reduced, by exploring research on techniques for improving intergroup relations. Moreover, this class will devote considerable attention to the issue of diversity, because increasingly diversity is a fact of life globally, it is inevitable, creates challenges and offers opportunities. Therefore, focusing on diversity will help students better understand prejudice and discrimination toward diverse groups. The solutions to these problems will be discussed: an understanding of diversity, in fact, offers unique insights and opportunities to better prepare people for a diverse social reality.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will learn about current scientific theory and research in the psychology of prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping and diversity. They will develop the skills necessary to evaluate and critically think about research in psychology and will be encouraged to think about how the psychological research can help us understand and explain current forms of prejudice and reduce discrimination.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The Psychology of Diversity: Beyond Prejudice and Racism James M. Jones, John F. Dovidio, and Deborah L. Vietze Wiley-Blackwell978-1405162142 Additional journal articles will be provided in class.
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
TestThe test category includes a midterm exam and a final exam. The tests will cover the assigned textbook readings, lectures, papers, and the films occasionally shown in class. Each test will be non-cumulative and will cover approximately 1/2 of the course material. Your grade for the category will be based on these 2 tests. NO MAKE UP will be allowed for any reasons. The final exam will not be cumulative (that is, the final exam will only cover material that was not covered in the midterm).60%
Papers (2)Paper 1: Each of you will choose, review and critically examine a research paper on a relevant topic in the domain of diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination you are very interested in (an important research question that we have covered or not covered in class: ut to you!). To that end, you will give a PowerPoint presentation. The article must come from Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Psychological Science, or Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Paper 2: Please, see above (Paper 1). Guidelines for presentations will be provided in class. 20%
Group ProjectThe mission of our class project is to break the habit of prejudice and discrimination against a group you will choose, by promoting Understanding, Awareness, Empathy, and Acceptance. You can find a name to the project. In our class, we will study the problem of prejudice in depth and, at the same time, we will ry to develop tools aimed at facing such a relevant issue. Details will be provided in class.20%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY
You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity. Absences due to other meaningful conflicts, such as job interviews, family celebrations, travel difficulties, student misunderstandings or personal convenience, will not be excused. Students who will be absent from a major exam must notify the Dean’s Office prior to that exam. Absences from class due to the observance of a religious holiday will normally be excused. Individual students who will have to miss class to observe a religious holiday should notify the instructor by the end of the Add/Drop period to make prior arrangements for making up any work that will be missed. The final exam period runs until ____________


In-Class Participation: Everyone’s active participation is an essential component of the class. I expect every student to contribute to the class discussions. Please note that in-class participation is also expected during the final class meetings, during which students will give their presentations. I expect that students not presenting will actively participate by asking the presenter thoughtful questions in order to generate conversation. The purpose of emphasizing in-class participation is to encourage everyone to exchange thoughts and ideas. 
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Topic Readings
week 1 Introduction to the class, syllabus overview, and other admin.  Material will be provided
  Intro: The psychology of Prejudice, Discrimination and Stereotypes
week 2 Intro: The psychology of Prejudice, Discrimination and Stereotypes Material will be provided
   Defining Diversity Chapter 1



week 3 Central concepts in diversity science Chapter 2
     
week 4 PAPER PRESENTATION 1
Prejudice and personality
Chapter 4
 

week 5 Social cognition and categorization Chapter 5
   
week 6

EXAM 1

Social Identities

Chapters 1-2-4-5 and material provided in class

Chapter 6
 

week 7  Is bias in the brain?  Chapter 7
 

week 8
PAPER PRESENTATION 2






 

week 9 Coping and adapting to stigma and difference 

First project review
Chapter 8
 
 
Week 10 Cultural diversity
Racism
Chapter 10
Additional reading *
     
week 11 Contemporary forms of prejudice: specific cases
Islamophobia
Phisical appearanche categorization
Microaggression
Additional readings *
     
week 12 Prejudice totard individuals with disabilities Material will be provided
     
week 13 Gender stereotypes
Prejudice against the LGBT+ community

Papers will be discussed in class



Additional readings *



 

week 14 Last project review + study day

EXAM 2

 
 

 


week 15

Group project: Presentations
*Additional readings will be available on MYJCU