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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 220"
COURSE NAME: "Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology"
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Sharon Salvadori
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: TTH 10:00-11:15 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Mandatory overnight trip to Naples and Paestum
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This upper level survey of Greek art and archaeology focuses on the visual culture of Ancient Greece in the Aegean and Western Mediterranean during the first millennium BCE. Students are introduced to a broad range of the extant evidence: architecture, sculpture, painted pottery, and objects of daily life. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between visual culture and religion, mythology, politics. The course begins with an introduction to the history of the discipline of Classical Archaeology and an overview of pre-historic Greece. Mandatory field trip may require a fee.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

The primary focus of the course is on the Greek art and architecture of the Aegean and the western Mediterranean from c. 1100 BC to c. 300 BC. Emphasis will be placed on the interrelationship of ancient art and architecture with ancient religion, mythology, politics and society. The material is organized in two main categories. The first and the larger of the two consists of monuments and art works set up collectively or by individuals for public viewing in sanctuaries, cemeteries and other communal spaces: temples, treasuries, free standing sculpture and reliefs. The second is art intended primarily for private consumption, such as the fantastic series of black- and red-figure paintings on vases that have survived from the Archaic and Classical periods. Classes take place at JCU with the exception of a mandatory field trips to Poseidonia (Roman Paestum) and the Archaeological Museum in Naples (estimated cost c. 120€).

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Ø knowledge and understanding of key typological, functional, iconographic, formal, stylistic and aesthetic elements in Ancient Greek art and architecture

Ø knowledge and understanding of the most important media and techniques used n Ancient Greek art and architecture

Ø knowledge of key Ancient Greek monuments (e.g. the Parthenon), iconic image-types (e.g. statues of divinities), mythological imagery, and other pictorial genres and an understanding of their meaning in their original contexts (e.g. painted vases are examined in the context of aristocratic banquets)

Ø skills for the critical analysis of visual and material culture general, including familiarity with different methods of archeological and art historical analysis and terminology and the ability to deploy them successfully

Ø ability to apply critical thinking and analysis generally

Ø ability to select and organize material to produce a coherent and cogent argument both orally and in writing- and to do so to so respecting deadlines

Ø ability to exchange ideas and engage in discussion with peers

 

 


TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Greek Art and Archaeology, 5th ed. John Griffiths PedleyPrentice Hall0-20-500133-5  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Archaic and Classical Greek ArtRobine OsborneOxford University Press0192842021 9780192842022 0192842641 9780192842640   
Greek ArtMark D FullertonCambridge University Press0521779731 9780521779739   
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
ParticipationIn addition to attendance, active class participation is expected of all students. This includes questions, observations and in-class discussion. Participating effectively entails completing and taking notes on all "Required Reading" before class and during class.5%
QuizzesYour preparation in the course of the semester will be evaluated through 6 quizzes based on the "Required Reading" (texts and images) and in-class lectures. The quiz with the lowest scores will be excluded from the final tally. That means that each of the remaining 5 quizzes is worth 5% of your course grade. Please be aware that if you miss a quiz -for any reason, including illness- you will not be able to make it up (it will be the one not tallied). All quizzes will be on material we have previously discussed in class and will be drawn exclusively from the PPoint "Study Images" posted on MYJCU. Typically, however, “Study Images” are not labeled, therefore you must refer to the “Required Reading” and PPoint lectures to determine their identity and significance. The quizzes are designed to assess your knowledge of key facts concerning representative monuments and artworks and your ability to critically interpret their historical significance. Each quiz will consist in one or more questions on specific areas, monument or object types, individual monuments or artworks or sets of monuments or artworks. You may be asked the name of an area, monument, building or artwork, as well as its location, date, function and/or patronage; you may also be asked to describe it (structural and decorative components, materials used, style, iconography, etc.); or you may be asked to a question on some aspect of its significance (e.g. the possible motivations for locating a temple in specific area of a city or the intended meaning- political, religious, social, aesthetic- of the iconography of a given monument or artwork.) Depending on the number and nature of the questions, you will be given anywhere between 5 and 10 minutes to answer. The dates and topics of the quizzes are listed in the Course Schedule.25%
Mid-term and Final ExamsEXAMS (Mid-term: 15%; Final: 20%) Both exams are structured to assess your knowledge of essential facts about individual sites (e.g. sanctuaries such as Delphi or the Athenian Akropolis), monuments, artworks in Greek centers in the Aegean and Western Mediterranean and your ability to critically interpret and asses their historical significance. The mid-term exam takes place on Class 15 for the duration of regular class time (75 minutes). It will cover material studied up to class 14. It consists in: -4 identifications: 5 minutes each (20% of the exam grade or 5% each) -2 comparisons: 10 minutes each (40% of the exam grade or 20% each) - 1 essay: 30 minutes (40% of the exam grade.) The final exam takes place during exam week (exact date, time and classroom TBA) and lasts 2 hours and 30 minutes. It is cumulative, although with a greater emphasis on material studied in the second half of term: generally speaking, you may expect material from the first half of term to show up in comparisons or in the essay, that is when it is relevant to the later developments which are the focus of the exam. The format is the same as that of the mid-term, but being a longer exam, there are more questions: -6 identifications: 5 minutes each (30% of the exam grade or 5% each) -4 comparisons: 10 minutes each (40% of the exam grade or 10% each) - 1 essay: 30 minutes (30% of the exam grade). A week prior to each exam, 2 essay questions accompanied by images of sites, monuments and artworks will posted on MYJCU. Only one of the two will be on the exam. However, the other topic will undoubtedly show up in the identifications and comparisons, so be sure to prepare for both. Review Sheets will also be provided a week before each exam. A review session is also scheduled for each exam (see Course Schedule)35%
PresentationThe presenation takes place during our mandatory weekend field-trip to Naples and Paestum. It consists of two parts. Part I: a 15 minute oral report to the class on a monument or artwork accompanied by a one or two-page handout to all members of the class (including me) with an outline of indicating the key points of your presentation and a bibliography; if appropriate, please also provide xeroxes of supporting images. Part II: a short paper (1000 words) consisting of your presentation elaborated in the form of a formal essay. The presentation itself combined with the class handout (50%) and the short paper (50%) is the basis of your grade. Depending on the topic, your presentation will take place either in the Archaeological Museum in Naples or at the archaeological site of Paestum. This will allow you to present before the artwork or monument that is the focus of your topic. The presentation papers are due in class on the Thursday after our field-trip weekend. Presentation Guidelines and topics will be posted in the second week of the term on MY JCU and will also be discussed in class. You will be required to choose your topic by week four. 15%
Term PaperPaper Abstract (100 words) and preliminary bibliography (min. 5 titles) due class 21. Essay (3000 words, exclusive of footnotes, bibliography, and images): due class 27. The term paper is intended to develop skills of independent research, ability to evaluate and interpret materials and their inherent interests, and capability for discussing these in a nuanced manner in writing. The paper must combine visual analysis, iconographic and historical research and contextual interpretation. In other words, it should be a formal essay that demonstrates the skills that you have developed and honed during the semester. The paper must include a complete bibliography of primary and secondary sources used and all references must be fully cited in the paper itself. **Paper guidelines, with a list of suggested topics and other specifications, will be posted on MYJCU by the 2nd week of the semester. We will review the guidelines after the mid-term exam, but please feel free to come to set up an appointment with me to discuss your paper any time before then. The paper abstract is essentially a thesis statement (please refer to the paper guidelines for specifics). This must be accompanied by a preliminary bibliography listing at least 5 titles. The abstract is not graded, but failing to turn will result in losing a quarter grade on your paper (e.g. a B+ becomes a B) 20%
   

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the cou
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:
All scheduled classes are mandatory. Roll will be taken at the beginning of each class. While there is no set rule for the number of absences allowed, 4 or more absences typically lead to very poor performance if not a failing grade.  Please be aware that missing classes may also entail missing quizzes, which may not be made up ( but see above  on the "throw away" quiz). Please also note that lectures often do far more than follow the required reading assignments. For this and other more obvious reasons, it is imperative to attend all lectures.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

1. Introduction

  • overview of course content: chronology and geography, main themes, approaches and learning aims
  • logistics: intro to syllabus and course schedule: course texts, assignments, etc.
The study of Greek Art and Archaeology past and present
Suggested reading
: Pedley (2012) "Introduction"


2. The study of Greek Art and Archaeology past and present, cont.

Required Reading: Pedley (2012) "Introduction"

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000), "Introduction: Concepts of the Classical"


3.
Bronze Age: highlights/ Forging new identities in Iron Greece, c.1100 BC-700 BC

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 4; Study Images: A. ProtoGeometric and Geometric vases and B. ProtoGeometric and Geometric period sites

Suggested reading: Pedley (2012), Chs. 1-3 (Bronze Age Greece); CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 35-43 ("The Emergence of the Polis and Geometric Art"); Osborne (1998), Ch. 2 ("From Praying to Playing: Art in the 8th century BC"); Coldstream in Rasmussen and Spivey (1991): Geometric vases; •CB Vases: van Wees (1998): gendering on Late Geometric vases •CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999): Ch. 2 (“The Dark Age of Greece and the 8th-century Renaissance”) CB Funerary Context:  Liston and Papadopoulos (2004): “Rich Athenian Lady”


4.
Forging new identities in Iron Age Greece, c.1100 BC-700 BC, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class


5.
Forging new identities in Iron Age Greece, c.1100 BC-700 BC, cont.

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 4; Study Images: A. ProtoGeometric and Geometric vases, B. ProtoGeometric and Geometric period sites and C. 8th cent. sanctuaries and votives

Suggested reading: see previous class

*Quiz 1: Proto-Geometric and Geometric vases (Coldstream article recommended)  


6.
Greece and the Mediterranean in the 7th cent. BC

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 5; Study Images: D. 7th cent sanctuaries and votives.

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 59-66 ("Orientalizing and the Formation of Greek Art"); Osborne (1998): Ch. 3 ("Reflections in an Eastern Mirror") and Ch. 5 ("Life Enlarged"); CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), Ch. 3 (“Archaic Greece c. 700-500”) 

**Discussion of Field Trip /Review of Presentation Guidelines** (Please come to class having read guidelines)

 
7. Greece and the Mediterranean in the 7th cent. BC, cont.

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 5; Study Images: E. ProtoCorinthian pottery and F. ProtoAttic pottery

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 59-66 ("Orientalizing and the Formation of Greek Art"); Osborne (1998): Ch. 3 ("Reflections in an Eastern Mirror"); Rasmussen in Rasmussen and Spivey (1991): Protocorinthian and Corinthian painted vases •CB Vases: Ebbinghaus (2005): Mykonos Trojan War pithos; Hurwit (2002): Chigi Vase; CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), Ch. 3 (“Archaic Greece c. 700-500”)   

*Quiz 2: Sanctuaries and votives: 8th-7th centuries (Osborne 1998, Ch. 2 and 3 recommended)


8.
Archaic Sanctuaries: Architecture and Architectural Sculpture

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 6, pp. 147-171; Study Images: G. Archaic Sanctuaries I and H. Archaic Sanctuaries II CB Sanctuaries: Marconi, (2004): Archaic temples function and meaning (posted MYJCU)

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 88-97 ("Archaic Art in Context"); 43-51 ("Political Aspects of Greek Art"), 67- 77 ("Self-definition") and 97-107 ("Greek narrative"); Osborne (1998): Ch. 5 ("Life Enlarged") and Ch. 7 (“Enter Politics”) CB Sanctuaries:  Marconi (2006): Temples Selinus; Neer (2001): Siphnian treasury at Delphi; Osborne (2000): temple sculpture and the viewer; Symeonoglou (1985): Doric Temples Poseidonia; CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), Ch. 3 (“Archaic Greece c. 700-500”) and Ch. 5, 159-178 (Athens 6th century)

9. Archaic Sanctuaries: Architecture and Architectural Sculpture, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class


10.
Archaic Sculpture:  votive and funerary sculpture

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 6, pp. 171-189; Study Images: I. Archaic Votive and Funerary Sculpture I and J. Archaic Votive and Funerary Sculpture II

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 88-97 ("Archaic Art in Context"), 43-51 ("Political Aspects of Greek Art") and 67- 77 ("Self-definition"); Osborne (1998): Ch. 5 ("Life Enlarged") and Ch. 7 (“Enter Politics”) •CB Sculpture: Karakasi (2003): korai - browse for picture (thesis problematic); Keesling,(2003): votive sculpture Athenian Akropolis, especially Ch. 1, 2 and 3 (definitions of votives and meaning korai); Osborne (1998b): male nudesCB Formal and Iconographic Studies: Bonfante (1989): nudity as costume; Osborne (1998b) heroic male nudesCB Funerary Context: Shapiro (1991): Iconography of Mourning, esp. 629-644;CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), Ch. 3 (“Archaic Greece c. 700-500”)  and Ch. 5, 159-178 (Athens 6th century)

*Quiz 3: Archaic Temples form and meaning (make sure to carefully re-read Marconi article)


11.
Archaic Sculpture: votive and funerary sculpture, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class


12.
The Black and the Red: painted vases in the Archaic and early Classical periods

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 6, pp. 189-205, Ch. 7, pp. 242-244 and Ch. 8, pp. 281-287; Study Images: K. Black-figure and L. Red-figure

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Robertson and Beard in Rasmussen and Spivey (1991): approaches to the study of vase painting; Boardman in Rasmussen and Spivey (1991): 6th century vase painting: artists and audience; Williams in Rasmussen and Spivey (1991): invention of red-figure;  Fullerton (2000): 88-97 ("Archaic Art in Context") and 97-107 ("Greek narrative"); Osborne (1998): Ch. 6 ("Marketing an Image") and Ch. 8 ("Gay Abandon"); CB Vases: Shapiro (1999): Attic black-figure narrative, composition and subject CB Formal and Iconographic Studies: Bonfante (1989): Nudity as Costume; Osborne (1998b) and Osborne (1998c):male nudes; CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), Ch. 3 (“Archaic Greece c. 700-500”)  and Ch. 5, 159-178 (Athens 6th century)

*Quiz 4: Archaic Votive and Funerary Sculpture (Osborne 1998: Ch. 5 and Ch. 7 recommended)


13.
The Black and the Red, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class


14. The Black and the Red
, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class

**Review for mid-term: remember to bring review sheet**

15.  Mid-term exam

16. The "Classical" Body I: sculpture, c. 480-450

Required Reading: Pedley (2012), Ch. 7, pp. 207-242; Study Images: M. Re-presenting the "Classical" Body I and N. Early Classical Sanctuaries

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 43-51 ("Political Aspects of Greek Art"), 67- 77 ("Self-definition"), 97-107 ("Greek narrative") and 116-139 (Style); Osborne (1998): pp. 124-131 (early Classical relief sculpture), 157-163 (free-standing sculpture),  and pp. 169-174 (sculpture Temple of Zeus at Olympia); Pollitt (1972): Art and experience in classical Greece: Chs. 1-2  CB Sculpture: Bell (1995): Motya Charioteer; Elsner (2006): rise of naturalism viewing and subjectivity; Hallet (1986): origins classical style; Hurwit (1989): Kritios Boy; Hurwit (2007): male nudes; Osborne (1998b) and Osborne (1998c): male nudesCB Formal and Iconographic Studies: Bonfante (1989): nudity as costume; CB Sanctuaries: Barringer (2005): Temple of Zeus at Olympia; Hurwit (1987): East Pediment Olympia iconography and meaning; Hurwit (2005) Parthenon and Temple of Zeus at Olympia; Osborne (2000) temple Sculpture and the viewer; Stehle and Day (1996) pediments Olympia gendered reading •CB Regions and Cities: Holscher (1998): Political identity in Athens (good on Tyrannicides); CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), 179-245 and 255-274 (5th century Greece)

**Review of Paper Guidelines**

17.The "Classical" Body I: sculpture, c. 480-450, cont./

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class

18. The "Classical" Body II: sculpture c. 450-400

Required Reading: Pedley (2012); Ch. 8, pp. 249-251 and pp. 276-281; Study Images: O. Re-presenting the "Classical" Body II

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000): 43-51 ("Political Aspects of Greek Art"), 67- 77 ("Self-definition") and 116-139 (Style); Osborne (1998): 157-163 (free-standing sculpture); CB Greek Art, Architecture & Archaeology: Pollitt (1972): Art and experience in classical Greece: Ch. 3  CB Sculpture: Elsner (2006): rise of naturalism viewing and subjectivity; Hallet (1986): origins classical style; Hurwit (2007): male nudes; Osborne (1998b) and Osborne (1998c): male nudes; Moon (1995): Polykleitos and the Doryphoros CB Formal and Iconographic Studies: Bonfante (1989): nudity as costume; Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), 179-245 and 255-274 (5th century Greece)

*Quiz 5: Early Classical Sanctuaries (recommended: Osborne (1998): pp. 124-131 and pp. 169-174)

19.  The "Classical" Body II: sculpture c. 450-400, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class

Classes 20 and 21: Field Trip to Naples and Poseidonia (=Roman Paestum) with student presentations

22. Monumentalizing Athens in the 5th century

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 7, pp. 227-229 (Athenian Agora c. 480-450) and Ch. 8, pp. 249-274; MY JCU: Study Images: P. Parthenon and Athena Parthenos

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Fullerton (2000), 27-35 (Parthenon Pediments), 53-59 (Parthenon Metopes), 79-88 (Parthenon frieze), 109-116 (Parthenon Style), 141-150 (Athena Parthenos); Osborne (1998): 174-187 (Parthenon); Pollitt (1972): Art and experience in classical Greece, Ch. 3 •CB Sanctuaries: Hurwit (1995): Athena Parthenos, Hurwit (1999): 154-188 (intro Acropolis High Classical Period) and 222-244 (Meanings Athenian Acropolis High Classical Period); Hurwit (2005) Parthenon and Temple of Zeus at Olympia; Jenkins (2005): Parthenon frieze horsemen; Jenkins (2006), Ch. 4 ("The Parthenon and its Sculptures"); Osborne (1987): Parthenon frieze; Younger (1997): gender and sexuality Parthenon frieze; CB Regions and Cities: Boedecker (1998): presenting the past in 5th cent. Athens; Castriota, D. (2005): Stoa Poikile; Holscher (1998): art and political identity in Athens; Osborne (2007): Democracy and Athenian topography; Stansbury-O’Donnel (2005) Stoa Poikile; Von Reden (1998): topography 5th cent. Athens; •CB Background and Context: Pomeroy et. al (1999), 179-245 and 255-286 (5th century Greece; Athens features prominently)

23. Monumentalizing Athens in the 5th century: the Parthenon

 Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 8, pp. 249-274; MY JCU: Study Images: P. Parthenon and Athena Parthenos

Suggested reading: see publications on Parthenon from previous class

****Presentation paper due****

24. Monumentalizing Athens in the 5th century: Parthenon, cont.

Required Reading: see previous class

Suggested reading: see previous class

**Term Paper abstract and preliminary bibliography due**
 

25. Monumentalizing Athens in the 5th century: Propylaia, Erechtheion, Athena Nike, Hephasteion, and Agora (c. 430-400)

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): Ch. 8, pp. 265-274; MY JCU: Study Images: Q. The Athenian Akropolis and Agora in the later 5th century

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Pollitt (1972): Art and experience in classical Greece, Ch. 4 •CB Sanctuaries: Hurwit (1999): 190-221 (Acropolis in the High Classical Period except Parthenon) and 222-244 (Meanings Athenian Acropolis High Classical Period); Jenkins (2006), Ch. 5 (Propylea, Athena Nike Temple and Erechtheum); Palagia (2005): frieze Temple of Athena Nike

26. The "Classical" Body III: sculpture, late 5th- late 4th fourth century

Required Reading: Pedley (2012): pp. 279-281 (late 5th c. grave reliefs) and Ch. 9, pp. 289-317; Study Images: R. Re-presenting the "Classical" Body III

Suggested reading: CB Reserve: Osborne (1998), Ch. 10 (The Claims of the Dead), Ch. 11 ("Individuals within and without the city") and Ch. 12 ("The Sensation of Art"); Pollitt (1972): Art and experience in classical Greece, Ch. 4 and 5 •CB Sculpture: Hurwit (2007): male nudes; Osborne (1998b) and Osborne (1998c): male nudes; Ridgway (1997): 4th century sculpture; Salomon (1997): nudes and gender asymmetry

27. The "Classical" Body III: sculpture, late 5th- late 4th fourth century

Required Reading: see previous class 

Suggested reading: see previous class

****Term Paper Due ****

28. Loose ends/ Review for Final Exam  (**Remember to bring review sheet**)

*Quiz 6: The Classical Body, 480-323 (Study Images: M, O, P and R)

FINAL EXAM: exact day, time and classroom TBA