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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "HS 210-1"
COURSE NAME: "Nineteenth-Century Europe and the World "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Fall 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Luca De Caprariis
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MW 8:30-9:45 AM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:
OFFICE HOURS: M,W: 10:00-11:00; T, Th: 4:30-5:30

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course explores the history of Europe and its relations with the larger world from the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. In it, students investigate the cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, and social developments that shaped the lives of nineteenth-century Europeans. Significant attention will be given to the relationship between Europeans and peoples in other parts of the world, the development of new political ideologies and systems, and the ways in which everyday life and culture changed during this period.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
There will be two class meetings per week. Lectures will be followed by questions and discussion. Students should come to lecture prepared, completing the assigned readings before each class meeting
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students should develop an understanding of the ideologies that shaped the 1800's, Conservatism, Liberalism and Marxist Socialism,  of the dissolution of the Vienna order, the Eastern Question, the first  Industrial Revolutions, and the process of Italian and German unification. The last section of the course will focus on the second industrial revolution and the acceleration of imperial expansion, the intellectual crisis of the fin-de-siècle and the origins of World War I.
TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
Schnitzler Century: the Making of Middle Class CulturePeter GayNorton9780393323634  
The Decline and Fall of the Habsburg EmpireA. SkedLongman978-0582356665  
Russia in the Age of Reaction and ReformsD. SaundersLongman978-0582489783  
A History of the Balkans: 1804-1945S. PavlowitchRoutledge9780582045842  
Europe and the Making of ModernityR. Winks, J. NeubergOxford9780195156225  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Midterm ExaminationEssay exam: students will answer two essay questions30%
Final ExaminationEssay exam: students will answer two essay questions35%
paperAll students will write a 10-12 page paper. Topics will be decided in consultation with instructor30%
in class participation 5%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS AND EXAMINATION POLICY















You cannot make-up a major exam (midterm or final) without the permission of the Dean’s Office. The Dean’s Office will grant such permission only when the absence was caused by a serious impediment, such as a documented illness, hospitalization or death in the immediate family (in which you must attend the funeral) or other situations of similar gravity.

Attendance is mandatory. Students should keep their mobile phones turned off  during class. You may use your laptop, but you are not allowed to surf the web during class. Should you fail to follow these rules I will ban laptops from classroom altogether.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Schedule of Topics
August

28 Introduction and overview. The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Legacies   WN: 1-9; Saunders: 1-54.

30 The Congress of Vienna and the “Concert of Europe.” Restoration and Revolution. WN: 11-40; Saunders: 54-56.

September

Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism. WN: 41-63Gay 3-33.

6  Empires and Monarchies. I. The Austrian Empire. Sked: 1-41.

11  II. The Russian Empire. Saunders: 59-173.

13  III. Ottoman Empire. Pavlowitch: 1-44.

18 France from Restoration to the Constitutional Monarchy. WN: 27-34

20 The British Empire and the World. WN: 35-38.

22 The Awakening of Nationalities in the Balkans. Pavlowitch: 45-71. WN 218-219.

25 Economic and social transformation. I. The Industrial Revolution. WN: 64-92.

27 Economic and social transformation. II. A new society. Ideas and Ideologies. WN: 93-152Gay: 35-125; 191-219.

October

2 1848. WN: 153-182Sked 42-139.

4 The Crimean War and the Eastern Question. WN: 183-188; Saunders: 173-203.

9 Midterm Examination

11 Nations and Empires I. Russia after the Crimean War. Saunders: 204-277; WN: 219-224.

16 Nations and Empires II . Austria after 1848. Sked: 140-190

18 Napoleon III and the Second Empire. WN: 188-192.

23 Nationalism and Nation Building I. Italy and Germany: Cavour and Bismarck WN: 197-204

25 The Balkans States under loosened control: 1856-1878. Pavlowitch: 72-114.

30 Great Britain and the Empire WN: 224-228.

November

6 The Third Republic in France. WN: 205-206.

8 The Dual Monarchy: Austria-Hungary. WN: 209-218; Sked: 191-243.

13 Russia under Alexander III and Nicholas II. Saunders:  278-373.

15 Germany from Bismarck to 1914. WN: 206-209.

20 The Intellectual crisis of the end of the Century. Gay: 97-153.

22 Expansion and the Search for a new International Stability. The "colonial scramble" I. WN: 257-278.

27 Expansion and the Search for a new International Stability.  The crisis of the Ottoman and Chinese Empires. II. WN 257-278.

29 The origins of the First World War.