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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "AH 290-3"
COURSE NAME: "Ancient Rome and Its Monuments "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Sharon Salvadori
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 2:30-4:15 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: On-site; activity fee: €40 or $52
OFFICE HOURS:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
STUDENTS SHOULD NOT REGISTER FOR BOTH AH190 and AH290
Rome City Series - This on-site course considers the art and architecture of ancient Rome through visits to museums and archaeological sites. The course covers the visual culture and architecture of Rome beginning with the Iron Age and ending with the time of Constantine. A broad variety of issues are raised, including patronage, style and iconography, artistic and architectural techniques, Roman religion, business and entertainment.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:
The topography of the city, in particular the monumental art and architecture patronized by the ruling elites, are the “primary sources” for the examination of the definition and developemnt of the urban space and the visual culture of Ancient Rome.  Political, religious, military and social functions and meanings of the monuments are prioritized.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:

-understanding of key aspects of urban layout and spatial organization in Ancient Rome
-understanding of key structural, functional and stylistic aspects of Ancient Roman art and architectureability to analyze and interpret the urban topography and development of Ancient Rome and, more specifically, the motives in the creation, use and reception of areas, neighborhoods and monuments in their original (Ancient) political, religious, and social contexts
-skills for the critical analysis of urban topography and visual culture generally
-familiarity with different methods of art historical analysis and terminology and the ability to deploy them successfully
-ability to apply critical thinking and analysis generally
-ability to select and organize material to produce a coherent and cogent argument both orally and in writing- and to do so to so respecting deadlines.
-ability to exchange ideas and engage in discussion with peers

TEXTBOOK:
NONE
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Participation Active participation is expected of all students, but the level or amount of your engagement is graded. Although participation is only 5% of the course grade it could ensure an A rather than an A- as your final grade. Participating means coming to class having read the week’s assignment (listed in the schedule below), prepared to ask and answer questions and to share any pertinent observations. Remember too that the more you engage, the more interesting the class will be not only for you but also for everyone else (me included).5%
Quizzes6 quizzes will be given in the course of the term (the dates will be inserted in the final course schedule.) The quiz with the lowest score will be omitted from the final tally; the remaining 5 quizzes are therefore each worth 4% of the course grade. Each quiz will consist in a series of questions on specific areas, monument types (including individual structural or stylistic features), individual monuments or sets of monuments in Ancient Rome. They are designed to assess your knowledge of essential facts and your ability to critically interpret and asses their historical significance. You may be asked the name of an area or monument, its location, its date, its function, its patronage; you may also be asked to describe it (main physical characteristics, structural and decorative components, materials used, etc); or you may be asked to a question on some aspect of its historical significance (e.g. the possible motivations for designating an area of the city with specific functions or the intended meaning- political, religious, social aesthetic, etc.- of individual monuments). The questions will be based on material that we have already covered in class, but completing the required reading is necessary to pass each and every quiz. Answers to individual questions should always be brief: in some cases one or two words or word or a short phrase will suffice and no answer should require more than two or three sentences. Depending on the quiz, you will be given anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes to answer. 20%
Presentation and Presentation EssayThe assignment consists of two parts: 1.a 15 minute oral report to the class on a monument or artwork. On the day of presentation you must also submit: a 1-2 page handout to all members of the class (including me) consisting of an outline of indicating the key points of your presentation, a bibliography and, if relevant, accompanying images. 2.a short paper (1500 words- c. 4-5 double spaced pages) consisting of your presentation elaborated in the form of a formal essay. The papers are due 1 class meeting after your oral delivery. (e.g. if you present on Monday, paper is due on Tuesday; there are no Thursday presentations). They must be submitted in both hard copy and sent electronically. You may not submit your paper on the day of your presentation, as the point is to integrate, refine, reassess information and incorporate your learning experience during course of presentation (including questions / issues raised by your classmates, me included). No late papers are accepted. The presentation and the class handout combined with the short paper are the basis of your grade. You may assume that each of the two parts is worth half of the grade (20% each); however, failure to deliver either part will result in a F for the assignment as a whole. We will be discussing the assignment in more detail during class 3. Please come to class having read the guidelines. 40%
Mid-term and Final examsThe mid-term and final exams take place on campus (see Course Schedule). Like the quizzes they are designed to assess your knowledge of essential facts about specific areas, monument types, individual monuments or sets of monuments in Ancient Rome and your ability to critically interpret and asses their historical significance. The mid-term covers material studied up to class 8. It takes place at JCU on Mon. June 5. The final is cumulative, although with a greater emphasis on material studied after the mid-term. It takes place at JCU on Friday June 23 (time TBA) Both exams consist in: -6 slide identifications 5 minutes each, worth 30% of your exam grade (5% each). Name, typology, date, media, (original) location, function, and patronage must be specified as known or relevant. E.g. the Colosseum does not, strictly speaking, have a subject, but the marble friezes on the Ara Pacis do; a portrait statue of Augustus is just that, but the emperor may be depicted as young, middle-aged or old, may be dressed in civilian, priestly or military garb (or combinations...) and these kinds of visual elements must be both mentioned and described (e.g. what visual devices are employed to represent Augustus made to look youthful? what iconographic elements denote that he is officiating as a priest?). Last but not least, you must indicate at least one reason the topographical area, monument or artwork was significant in its original historical context. For example in addition to noting that the Colosseum was built by Vespasian on the site of the artificial lake in Nero's Domus Aurea complex, you should explain (however briefly) that the location was very significant from a symbolic (and propagandistic) point of view since it transformed imperial property destined for the private enjoyment of Nero to a public venue destined for the entertainment of all Roman citizens. Similarly, in addition describing how a portrait of Augustus depicts him as young, you should mention that all his portraits show him as young and discuss (however briefly) what message was being conveyed by this representation of his "eternal" youth....An identification which lists a complete series of correct facts, but fails to discuss why they are significant, will score lower than one that is missing a few facts but which includes an assessment of historical significance. -4 slide comparisons 10 minutes each, worth 40% of the exam grade (10% each). One or more images of two sites or monuments will be shown to you. You must identify each one (again name, typology, date, media, (original) location, function, patronage; but you must primarily consider the two artworks or monuments in relation to one another, i.e. discuss significant similarities and differences. These are often thematic elements and meaning in historical context (patronage, intended message/s ect.), rather than media or structural components. -1 essay 30 minutes, worth 30% of the exam grade. The week before each exam you will be given 2 essay questions accompanied by images of sites and/or monuments. One of the two will be on exam. However, the other topic will undoubtedly show up in the identifications and comparisons, so be sure to prepare for both. Review Sheets will be posted on MY JCU 3 days before each exam. We will have review sessions the day before each exam. 35% OF COURSE GRADE; MID-TERM 15%; FINAL 20%

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the cou
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

All scheduled classes are mandatory. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class. You are allowed two unjustified absences- no questions asked- but 3 unjustified absences will result in a failing grade for the course. Justified absences are documented illness and accidents (doctor’s note required). Travel mishaps do not constitute a justified absence. 

On-site courses obviously require moving, you must therefore also always be punctual at our initial meeting points (specified below in the class schedule). It is your responsibility to find out where the meeting places are. Coarelli, F. (2007) Rome and Environs. An Archeological Guide (your textbook!) has many useful maps to locate sites. For subway and bus lines consult www.atac. it (available in English).

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

 

1. Mon. May 22

Meeting place:

Introduction to course: content, methodology, requirements, logistics, etc.

JCU, Guarini, Kushlan Wing, 1.2

Rome's foundation: topography and mythology/ Architectural typologies and building materials (on site)

 

2. Tues. May 23

Meeting place:

Required reading:





Suggested Reading:

 

Rome's foundation: topography and mythology, cont. / Architectural typologies and building materials, cont.

Forum Boarium, by Round Temple

Coarelli (2007): 1-9 (Introduction), 348-50 (Tiber Island), 307-10 (intro. F Holitorium, et al), 315-19 (Portus Tiberinus, T Portunus and Ara Maxima Hercules), 323-27 (Circus Maximus); 130-33 (intro. Palatine), 28-32 (intro. Capitoline), 332-335 (intro Aventine); Claridge (2010): 39-61 (building materials and techniques, architectural orders and dimensions, building types) xeroxing the pages from Claridge is strongly recommended, as they will come in handy throughout course

Coulston and Dodge in Coulston and Dodge 2000: introduction to archeology and topography of Rome; Elsner (1998), Ch. 2 ("A Visual Culture"); Kleiner (1992): 1-17 (Introduction); Stamper (2005): 6-10 (Introduction and Ch. 1)

3. Wed. May 24

Meeting place:

Required reading:



Suggested Reading:

*Quiz 1:

Monuments and identity: Kings to Mid-Republic

Palatine Hill entrance on Via di San Gregorio

Coarelli (2007): 130-38 (intro. Palatine, Iron Age huts, western temples), 42-47 (intro R Forum), 91-92 (Archaic cemetery), 81-89 (Via Sacra, Regia, T Vesta, House Vestal Virgins), 50-57 (Shrine Venus Cloacina, Comitium, Curia Hostilia, Black Stone); Stamper (2005): 6-10 (Kings of Rome)

 

Smith in Coulston and Dodge (2000), esp. 24-35: early and Archaic Rome

architectural orders / Roman use of architectural orders

Discussion of Presentation Guidelines

4. Thurs. May 25

 

Meeting place:

Required reading:

 

Suggested Reading:

Monuments and identity: Kings to Mid-Republic, cont.

 

Capitoline Hill, by Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius

Coarelli (2007): 28-36 (intro. Capitoline, T JOM, Area Capitolina), 65-66 (T Saturn), 74-77 (T Castor and Pollux and Juturna), 40 (T Juno Moneta, Auguraculum); Stamper (2005): Ch. 1 & 2 (T JOM) and 34-40 (early Republican R Forum)

Cornell in Coulston and Dodge (2000): Rome in the Mid-Republic

Sign up for presentations

5. Mon. May 29

Meeting place:

Required reading:



 

Suggested Reading:




Presentation:

*Quiz 2:

Republican Rome: triumphs, temples, honor, and fame

Largo Argentina, by Feltrinelli Bookstore

Coarelli (2007): 260-67 (intro C Martius, Circus Flaminius), 270-71 (T Apollo Sosianus and T Bellona), 275-80 (Area Sacra), 289-90 (Saepta Julia), 307-10 (intro. F Holitorium, et al), 313-19 (Temples F Holitorium, T Portunus and Round T); Stamper (2005): 44-48 (Area Sacra Largo Argentina), 49-50 (triumph, victory temples), 53-56 (temples southern Campus Martius), 59-68 (temples F Holitorium, T Portunus), 68-81 (Round T, Area Sacra Largo Argentina)

Beard (2007), esp. 42-53, 92-106: triumphal route/culture; Cornell in Coulston and Dodge (2000): Rome in the Mid-Republic; Flower (2004): 326-31, 338-40 (triumphs, spectacle & politics); Orlin (1997): Republican temples & politics; Patterson (1992): Rome topography Republic to Empire; Pollitt (1986): 41-43, 158 (Portico Metellus); Shelton (1998): 251-52, 329-31: triumphs & spectacles; Ziokowski (1988): Round T

1. Round Temple in the Forum Boarium

Roman Forum Valley: constructing communal identity 7th– early 6th cents. BC (kings)

6. Tues. May 30

Meeting place:

Required reading:



Suggested Reading:



 

 

Presentations:

Monumentalizing Rome in the Late Republic and Early Empire

Piazza Farnese, by fountain on left side (when facing Palazzo Farnese)

Coarelli (2007): 283-285 (Theatre Pompey), 103-113 (F Caesar, F Augustus); Kleiner (1992): 59-61 (intro Augustus and Augustan art) and 99-103 (F Augustus); Stamper (2005): 84-102 (Theatre Pompey, F of Caesar) and 105- 108 (intro to Augustus) and 130-141 (F of Augustus)

Coleman in Coulston and Dodge (2000), pp. 219-227: (entertainment/ theatres); DeRose Evans (2009): Sculpture Theatre Pompey; Galinsky(1996):197-213 (Forum of Augustus); Gleason (1994): portico/theatre of Pompey; Kellum (1997): esp. 164-7 (F Augustus); Kuttner (1999): Theatre Pompey; Packer in Ewald and Noreña (2010): 135-60 (Theatre Pompey); Patterson (1992): Rome topography Republic to Empire; Von Blanckenhagen (1954) Imperial Fora; Walker in Coulston and Dodge 2000: 61-75 (Augustan patronage); Wallace-Hadrill (1998): Greek identity in Rome; Ward Perkins (1981): Ch. 1 ("Augustan Rome"); Zanker (1988), 185-215 (F Augustus)

2. Theatre of Pompey

3. Forum of Augustus and temple of Mars Ultor

7. Wed. May 31

Meeting place:

Required reading:

 

Suggested reading:


 

Presentations:

 




*Quiz 3:

The Roman Forum during the reigns of Caesar and Augustus

Roman Forum entrance on Via dei Fori Imperiali

Coarelli (2007): 42-54 (R Forum overview, Bas. Aemilia, Porticus Gaius & Lucius, Comitium), 57-59 (Curia), 64-5 (Rostra), 71-75 (Bas. Julia, T Castor and Pollux), 79-81 (Divus Iulius, Arch of Augustus), Stamper (2005): 103-104 (Caesarian R Forum), 105-111 (Divus Iulius), 141-150 (R Forum at end of Augustus reign)

Gurval (1997): Divus Julius/Comet; Patterson (1992): Rome topography Republic to Empire; Rose (2005): esp. 28-36 (Parthian Arch/ Arch of Augustus); Walker in Coulston and Dodge 2000: 61-75 (Augustan patronage); Wallace-Hadrill (1998): Greek identity in Rome; Ward Perkins (1981): Ch. 1 ("Augustan Rome")


4. Curia Julia

5. Temple to the Deified Julius Caesar

6. Parthian Arch (Coarelli’s Augustan Arch)


Victory Temples

8. Thurs. June 1


Meeting place:

Required reading:

Suggested reading:

 

 

 

 


Presentations:

Self-representation: portraiture from the Late Republic to Augustus /

The Garden Fresco from the villa of Livia at Prima Porta

Palazzo Massimo entrance (Piazza dei Cinquecento, by Termini)

Kleiner (1992): Ch. 1: 31-47 (Republican Portraiture), Ch. 2, 59-69 (intro to Augustus and Augustan portraiture), 75-89 (Augustan female portraiture and freedmen portraits)

Christ (1997); toga/ togate portraits; Fejfer (2009): Roman portraits, esp. Part I (honorific portraiture), 181-213 (male body types), 262-270 (Republican portraiture), and 331-426 (imperial portraiture); Galinsky (1996): 164-79 (Augustan portraits); Kellum (1994): garden fresco; Kleiner (1992): Ch. 3: 123-141 (Julio-Claudian portraiture); Rose in Bell and Hansen 2008 (Republican portraits); Stevenson (1998): honorific nude portrait statues; Smith (1981): Republican Portraits; Smith (1996): Augustan portraiture; Strong (1988): Preface to the First Edition and Ch. 1 ("The Beginnings"), Ch. 2 (The Mid and Late Republic), Ch. 4 (Transitions to the Empire and Augustus); Wallace-Hadrill (1993): 81-85 (Augustus); Wallace-Hadrill (1998): Greek identity in Rome; Zanker (1988): Introduction, Ch. 1, esp. 5-25, Ch. 2, esp. 33-65, and. Ch. 3 (Late Republican portraits/ Augustan portraits): Zanker (2009): portraits Julius Caesar

7. Garden Fresco from Villa of Livia at Prima Porta

8. Via Labicana Augustus (portrait statue of Augustus)

Review for mid-term exam

 please come to class having read review sheet and essay questions

9. Mon. June 5

Meeting Place:

MID-TERM EXAM

JCU

10. Tues. June 6 

Meeting Place:

Required reading:

Suggested reading:


 

 

Presentations:


The Campus Martius in the Age of Augustus

Side of the Ara Pacis Museum by inscription opposite Mausoleum of Augustus

Coarelli (2007): 299-304 (Ara Pacis and Mausoleum); Kleiner (1992): 59-61 (intro to Augustus and Augustan art), 90-99 (Ara Pacis and Mausoleum);

Clarke (2003): 19-28 (monuments northern C Martius); Davies (2000): 137-42 (mausoleum); Galinsky (1996): 84-88 (virtues, cf. Romulus/Aeneas), 139-55 (Ara Pacis); Kleiner and Buxton (2008): Ara Pacis; Holliday (1990): Ara Pacis; Patterson (1992): Rome topography Republic to Empire; Rose (1990): Ara Pacis; Strong (1988): 80-84 (Ara Pacis); Walker in Coulston and Dodge 2000: 61-75 (Augustan patronage); Ward Perkins (1981): Ch. 1 ("Augustan Rome"); Zanker (1988), esp. 72-75, 139-43, 156-9, 172-83 (Augustan C Martius)

9. Mausoleum of Augustus

11. Wed. June 7

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:


Suggested reading:



 

Presentation:

*Quiz 4: 

 The Campus Martius in the Age of Augustus, cont.

Piazza Montecitorio, by Horologium

Coarelli (2007): 267-272 (Theater Marcellus, T Apollo Sosianus, Portico Octavia), 285-286 (Baths of Agrippa), Stamper (2005): 119-125 (Temple of Apollo Sosianus, Portico of Octavia)

Clarke (2003): 19-28 (monuments northern C Martius); Coleman in Coulston and Dodge (2000), 219-227 (entertainment/ theatres); Davies (2000): 13-19, 76-78 (horologium); Heslin (2007): horologium; Patterson (1992): Rome topography Republic to Empire; Walker in Coulston and Dodge 2000: 61-75 (Augustan patronage); Thomas (1996): Pantheon Agrippa to S Severus; Ward Perkins (1981): Ch. 1 ("Augustan Rome"); Zanker (1988), esp. 72-75, 139-43, 156-9, 172-83 (Augustan C Martius)

10. Horologium (aka Augustan ‘sundial’)

Ara Pacis

12. Thurs. June 8

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:

 

 

Suggested reading:

 

 

Nero’s Domus Aurea / The re-shaping of central Rome under the Flavians

Metro stop Colosseo (B line): by Roman sarcophagus (past newspaper stand)

Coarelli (2007): 177-186 (intro Esquilne and Domus Aurea), 159-160 (intro Col. Valley), 164-172 (Col., Ludus Magnus), 125-128 (T Peace), 113-115 (F Transistorium), Kleiner (1992): 167-173 (intro Civil War AD 68-69 and Flavian Dynasty), 179-81 (sculptural display T Peace), 192-194 (F Transistorium); Stamper (2005): 151 (intro Flavians), 156-159 (T Peace), 159 (intro Titus and Domitian), 161-168 (F Transistorium)

Albertson (2001): Colossus Nero; Anderson (1982): T Peace and F Transistorium; Coleman in Coulston and Dodge (2000), 227-240 (entertainment/ amphitheatres) Marlowe (2006): 225-9 (Colossus of Nero); Noreña (2003) T of Peace; Pollard (2009): T Peace; Strong (1988) 122- 125 (Domus Aurea); Taub (1993): Forma Urbis; Ward Perkins (1981): 56-61 (Domus Aurea); 63-84 (Flavian architecture); Welch (2007), 147-62 (Domus Aurea and Colosseum); Zanker in Ewald and Noreña (2010): esp. 66-78, 81-87 (buildings for games)

13. Mon. June 12

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:

 

Suggested reading:


Presentation:

 

*Quiz 5:

The re-shaping of central Rome under the Flavians, cont.

Roman Forum entrance on Via dei Fori Imperiali

Coarelli (2007): 66-67 (T Vespasian & Titus), 97-88 (Arch of Titus), 145-154 (Domitian’s Palace); Kleiner (1992): 183-190 (Arch of Titus); Stamper (2005): 151-156 (Flavian rebuilding of JOM), 159-161 (T Vespasian & Titus), 168-172 (Arch of Titus and Capitoline)

Davies 2000: 19-27, 67-71, 142-48 (Arch of Titus); Strong (1988) 127-131 (Arch of Titus); Thomas (2004): Equus Domitiani and Domitan patronage R Forum area; Ward Perkins (1981): 63-84 (Flavian architecture)

11. Equus Domitiani (equestrian statue of Domitian)


Vespasian’s Patronage in central Rome (Colosseum and Temple of Peace)

14. Tues. June 13

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:


Suggested reading:




 

Presentation:

 Trajan's Forum Complex/ Imperial Fora
(at Museum of the Fori imperiali in Trajan's markets)

Column of Trajan- on steps of small park

Coarelli (2007): 115-125 (Trajan's F and markets); Kleiner (1992): 212-223 (sculpture in Trajan's F); Stamper (2005): Ch. 10 (Trajan's F)


Clarke
(2003): 28-41 (Forum and Column of Trajan); Coulston (2003): depictions of barbarians Forum/column of Trajan;Davies (1997) and (2000): 127-135: column of Trajan; Packer (2001): Trajan's F (see for plans and reconstructions); Strong (1988): 141-153 Trajan's F; Von Blanckenhagen (1954) "The Imperial Fora"; Ward Perkins (1981): 84-95: Trajan's patronage in Rome and Ch 4:"Materials and Methods: The Roman Architectural Revolution"; Zanker in Ewald and Noreña 2010: esp 48-60, 75-81, 84-87 (porticoes and public spaces).

12. Trajan's Markets

15. Wed. June 14

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:



Suggested reading:

 

*Quiz 6:

The representation of the imperial persona: Trajan to Marcus Aurelis

Capitoline Hill by equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius

Kleiner (1992): 207-212 (intro to Trajan; portraiture of Trajan and Plotina) 237-42 (intro to Hadrian; portraiture Hadrian and Sabina), 253-56 (Arco di Portogallo Reliefs and Adventus Relief), 267-80 (intro Antonines and Antonine portraiture), 283-85 (intro Antonine State Releifs and Hadrianeum reliefs), 288-95 (Marcus Aurelius Reliefs)

Fejfer (2009): Roman portraits, esp. Part I (honorific portraiture) and 331-426 (imperial portraiture); Hughes (2009): Province Reliefs Hadrianeum; Smith (1985): imperial portraiture; Strong (1988): 159-62 (Trajanic portraiture), 171-82 (Hadrianic portraiture and relief sculpture), 200-01 (Aurelian relief panels), 211-14 (Antonine portraiture)

Trajan’s Forum Complex

16. Thurs. June 15

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:



Suggested reading:

 

Hadrianic and Antonine Monumental Patronage

Capitoline Hill by equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius

Coarelli (2007): 98-99 (T Venus & Roma), 286-89 (Pantheon), 291-93 (Hadrianeum), 296-99 (columns M. Aurelius and A. Pius); Kleiner (1992): 283-85 (Hadrianeum), 295-301 (column M. Aurelius); Stamper (2005): Ch. 11 (Pantheon) and 212-14 (Hadrianeum), 206-212 (T Venus and Roma)

Boatwright in Ewald and Noreña (2010): 169-74, 186-96 (Hadrianeum, columns A. Pius & M. Aurelius); Clarke (2003): 42-53 (column M. Aurelius); Davies (2000): 34-48, 79-83 and 158-171 (Mausoleum Hadrian, Pantheon, columns A. Pius and M. Aurelius); Elsner (1998): 63-73; Hughes (2009): Province Reliefs from Hadrianeum; Pirson (1996): column of M. Aurelius; Strong (1988): 206-11 (column M. Aurelius); Thomas (1996): Pantheon Agrippa to S Severus; Ward-Perkins (1981): Ch 4 ("Materials and Methods: The Roman Architectural Revolution) and 111-18 (Pantheon)

17. Mon. June 19

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:


Suggested reading:



 

Presentations:

Monuments of Severan Rome

Capitoline Hill by equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius

Coarelli (2007): 60-63 (Arch S Severus), 320 (Arch of the Argentarii) 155 (Septizodium), 327-331 (Baths of Caracalla); Kleiner (1992): 316-19 (intro to Severans), 329-332 (Arch S Severus), 334-339 (Arch of the Argentarii, Baths of Caracalla)

Brilliant (1967): Arch S Severus; Clarke (2003): Ch. 2, esp. 53-67 (Arches of S. Severus and Constantine); Elsner (2005): Arch Argentarii; Gorrie (2004): esp. p. 61-68 (Severan patronage); Lusnia in Dillon and Welch 2009 (Arch of S. Severus); Lusnia (2004): Septizodium; Marvin (1983): Sculptures Baths Caracalla; Piranomonte (2012): Baths of Caracalla; Strong (1988): 218-222 (Severan reliefs); Zajac (1999): bathing; Zanker in Ewald and Noreña 2010: esp. 61-66, 75-81, 84-87 (imperial baths).

13. Arch of Septimius Severus

18. Tues. June 20

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:


Suggested reading:

The representation of the imperial persona: Septimius Seveus to Constantine

Capitoline Hill by equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius

Kleiner (1992): 316-29 (intro to Severans and Severan portraiture), 357-384 (intro. 3rd cent. and 3rd cent. portraiture), 433-444 (Constantinian portraiture)

Harrison (1967): Constantinian portraiture; Smith (1997): early 4th century imperial portraiture; Wright (1987) Portraiture of Constantine


19. Wed. June 21

Meeting Place:

Required Reading:

 

Suggested reading:


Presentations:

Monuments in Rome under the Tetrarchy and Constantine

Roman Forum Entrance on Via dei Fori Imperiali

Coarelli (2007): 59-60 (focus on Tetrarchic decennalia monument), 89-91 (T Romulus), 95-97 (Basilica Maxentius), 160-163 (Arch Constantine); Kleiner (1992): 413-17 (Decennalia monument), 445-55 (Arch Constantine; on the reliefs of the Arch see also see also pp. 251-53 and 288-95)

Clarke (2003): Ch. 2, esp. 53-67 (Arches of S. Severus and Constantine) Marlowe (2006): Arch Constantine; Peirce (1989): Arch of Constantine; Strong (1988): 264-266 (Tetrarchs), 276-278 (Arch Constantine); Ward-Perkins (1981): 426-430 (Basilica Nova, T Divus Romulus, Arch Constantine); Wilson Jones (2000): Arch Constantine

14. Arch of Constantine

20. Thurs. June 22

Meeting Place:

Loose ends/ Review for Final Exam

JCU

 

Friday June 23

 

 

********Final EXAM at JCU**********

Time and classroom TBA