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JOHN CABOT UNIVERSITY

COURSE CODE: "PS 335"
COURSE NAME: "Theories of Personality "
SEMESTER & YEAR: Summer Session I 2017
SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTOR: Erik Noftle
EMAIL: [email protected]
HOURS: MTWTH 2:00 PM 3:45 PM
TOTAL NO. OF CONTACT HOURS: 45
CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisite: PS 101
OFFICE HOURS: MW 16:00-16:30

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Personality is generally defined as an individual’s unique stable pattern of thinking, feeling and behaving, and its study has been an extremely important focus in scientific psychology. This course examines the various theories of personality and, according to each theory, a personality’s structure and development. The scope of theories studied will be from the Freudian tradition through to Trait Theories, Biological Perspectives, Behavioral/Social Learning theories, Humanistic/Existential models and finally to more current Cognitive theories. Students will have opportunities to critically evaluate each theory/perspective, and in each of the theories address a variety of questions.
SUMMARY OF COURSE CONTENT:

Welcome to Theories of Personality! The aim of this course is to give you an in-depth introduction to contemporary and classic perspectives on personality psychology. We will discuss personality at all different levels: human nature, individual and group differences, and the unique individual. As you’ll see, personality psychology integrates a diverse range of topics – topics such as biology, work, social relationships, physical and psychological health, cognition, emotion, free will, culture, dreams, sex, and aggression – and applies them to the scientific study of the individual.

Whereas this class is partly lecture-based, class participation is highly encouraged—I’d like you ask questions when you have them, and speak up if you have comments. There will be several days when the class format is more discussion-based, and I will also have questions for you on a regular basis. There will be several activities throughout the course for which your in-class participation will be required.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Student Learning Objectives

I have three student learning objectives for the course:

Objective #1 is for students to understand the different approaches and perspectives in personality psychology. We will cover current and classic theories, research, and applications of personality psychology in class and in readings, and I will test your mastery and knowledge of these areas using both exams and papers.

Objective #2 is for students to learn how personality psychologists study their field scientifically.  We will discuss several methods used to test theories and to conduct research in personality, and I will test your knowledge of these areas and your creative ability to apply this knowledge to novel hypothetical situations.

Objective #3 is for students to directly and indirectly apply concepts central to personality psychology to their own lives, in the pursuit of better understanding of oneself and other people. Coursework not only includes feedback on your personality using some of the most commonly administered inventories in personality research, but also affords you the opportunity to engage in application of theories and research from the course to your own life and life story, in the form of a written psychoautobiography.

TEXTBOOK:
Book TitleAuthorPublisherISBN numberLibrary Call NumberComments
The personality puzzle (7th Ed.)David C. FunderW. W. Norton978-0-393-26514-9  
REQUIRED RESERVED READING:
NONE

RECOMMENDED RESERVED READING:
NONE
GRADING POLICY
-ASSESSMENT METHODS:
AssignmentGuidelinesWeight
Exam 1 20
Exam 2 20
Exam 3 20
Participation/Assignments 20
Final Paper 20

-ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
AWork of this quality directly addresses the question or problem raised and provides a coherent argument displaying an extensive knowledge of relevant information or content. This type of work demonstrates the ability to critically evaluate concepts and theory and has an element of novelty and originality. There is clear evidence of a significant amount of reading beyond that required for the course.
BThis is highly competent level of performance and directly addresses the question or problem raised.There is a demonstration of some ability to critically evaluatetheory and concepts and relate them to practice. Discussions reflect the student’s own arguments and are not simply a repetition of standard lecture andreference material. The work does not suffer from any major errors or omissions and provides evidence of reading beyond the required assignments.
CThis is an acceptable level of performance and provides answers that are clear but limited, reflecting the information offered in the lectures and reference readings.
DThis level of performances demonstrates that the student lacks a coherent grasp of the material.Important information is omitted and irrelevant points included.In effect, the student has barely done enough to persuade the instructor that s/he should not fail.
FThis work fails to show any knowledge or understanding of the issues raised in the question. Most of the material in the answer is irrelevant.

-ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Class Attendance.  It is strongly suggested that you make every attempt to attend all class meetings.  Students are responsible for all materials discussed, distributed, and referred to during lectures, including any changes to the syllabus that are discussed.  In addition, students are responsible for occasional assignments that are completed in class.  Students are expected to read the assigned chapters and readings, actively listen, and make an effort to contribute to class discussions. I do not post lecture slides, but you are always welcome to come and look at them during my office hours.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
As stated in the university catalog, any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty will receive a failing grade on the work in which the dishonesty occurred. In addition, acts of academic dishonesty, irrespective of the weight of the assignment, may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course. Instances of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs. A student who is reported twice for academic dishonesty is subject to summary dismissal from the University. In such a case, the Academic Council will then make a recommendation to the President, who will make the final decision.
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITIES
John Cabot University does not discriminate on the basis of disability or handicap. Students with approved accommodations must inform their professors at the beginning of the term. Please see the website for the complete policy.

SCHEDULE

Date

Tentative Class Topic

Readings DUE

Assignments DUE

May

22

Introduction and Syllabus; What is Personality?

Funder Chpt. 1

 

 

23

Research: Types of Personality Data

2

Who am I? due

 

24

Research: Research Methods in Personality

3

 

 

25

Research: Personality Assessment

Furr (2001)

 

 

29

Research: Traits, Situations, and Behavior

4

 

 

30

Research: Personality Judgement

5

 

 

31

Exam 1

 

 

June

1

Film: The Up Series

 

 

 

5

Trait Approaches: Trait Systems

6

 

 

6

Trait Approaches: Development

7

 

 

7

Biological Approaches: Physiology

8

 

 

8

Biological Approaches: Genetics & Evolution

9

 

 

12

Topic: The Self and Identity

16

 

 

13

Exam 2

 

 

 

14

Behaviorist and Social-Cognitive Approaches

14 & 15

 

 

15

Psychodynamic Approaches: Freud

10

 

 

19

Psychodynamic Approaches: Post-Freudians

11

Final Paper Due

 

20

Existential and Humanistic Approaches

12

 

 

21

Topic: Personality and Culture

13

 

 

22

Personality Psychology: Wrapping Up

Epilogue

 

 

23

Exam 3